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Hasina

Mississippi Ratifies 13th Amendment!

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After oversight, Mississippi ratifies 13th Amendment abolishing slavery almost 150 years after its adoption

It’s about time!

The State of Mississippi officially ratified the 13th Amendment, which outlawed slavery … nearly 150 years after most of the states in the union did.

The gross delay, fixed earlier this month, was the result of a clerical error that left unrecorded what many state officials thought was its official ratification nearly 20 years ago.

The Mississippi Legislature had actually formally ratified the historic amendment in 1995, which even then was more than a century late, but because the ratification document was never presented to the U.S. archivist, it was never considered official.

According to The Clarion-Ledger, the bizarre error was discovered by a pair of patriotic Mississippians, who, after seeing the movie "Lincoln," looked up historical accounts of Mississippi's action and brought to the attention of state officials that they had never, in fact, ratified one of the most important documents in modern history.

The 13th Amendment, which outlawed all slavery and involuntary servitude except as punishment for a crime, was passed by the U.S. Senate on April 8, 1864, and by the House of Representatives on Jan. 31, 1865.

Throughout 1865, 26 states ratified the critical law, and in December of that year, the amendment was formally adopted into U.S. law after Georgia’s approval brought the number the required 27.

Several states, including Kentucky and Delaware, waited decades to ratify the amendment, the last being Mississippi in 1995 -- or so the state thought.

Source: http://www.nydailyne...ticle-1.1267133

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do they have horse drawn carts as the most used form of transport?

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Quite progressive for Mississippi

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do they have horse drawn carts as the most used form of transport?

Do they have indoor plumbing where you live? Electricity?

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Sounds about right for Mississippi. They do things a bit sllllloooooowwwwwweeeeerrrrr down there.

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So technically slavery wasn't ilegal until now?

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So technically slavery wasn't ilegal until now?

It would appear not. But is was Federal law. So the Feds could have intervened.

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I lived in central Mississippi for 8 years. More churches than bars and good people in abundance. Public school education is a problem in areas due to the poverty of the state - it is usually 49 or 50 on the list of poorest states but that doesn't mean the people there are somehow slower or stupid. They fully understand what most of the rest of the country thinks of them - and couldn't care less. They are proud, hard working and patriotic as a rule and frankly, deserve more respect than they are being shown here. THAT is coming from a neighbor in Alabama.....

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I always think of Grady and the Squash Festival of "doc hollywood"

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Its all done now. Mississippi finally abolished slavery. Its over finally . The last slaves were freed. :tu:

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