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Free will has neural basis

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A new theory of brain function by Peter Ulric Tse, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at Dartmouth College, suggests that free will is real and has a biophysical basis in the microscopic workings of our brain cells. Tse's findings, which contradict recent claims by neuroscientists and philosophers that free will is an illusion, have theological, ethical, scientific and legal implications for human behavior, such as whether people are accountable for their decisions and actions.

His book shows how free will works in the brain by examining its information-processing architecture at the level of neural connections. He offers a testable hypothesis of how the mental causes the physical. In contrast with philosophers who use logic rather than data to argue whether mental causation or consciousness can exist, he explores these issues by starting with neuroscientific data.

http://medicalxpress...ural-basis.html

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Posted (edited)

Makes sense. Think of an egg and a round circle in the egg, depending on the physics of the egg and the other things in the egg there will be a place to move. besides the round circle there will be other things in it like squares and triangles that can't move, That space would be free will. Now think of the egg and round circle as game world, and the round circle as your character. Depending on the laws of the game(the neural pattern of the brain) movement would be possible and could actually effect the neural pattern of the brain. Meaning free-will considering the mind and humans could actually exist. It would still be limited to the confines of the world around it because of the body to world barrier. So pulling off matrix like moves here seems highly unlikely unless you develop some very awesome tech.

Edited by Jinxdom

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I've always seen the free will debate as on the same order as the debate about solipsism.

Those who say free will is an illusion might as well dig a big hole and jump in.

The article was interesting, but the studies don't appear to me to really do what the headline suggests. We may well have a randomizer in our brains of some sort to toss the coin when there is insufficient cause to force an action one way or the other, but that is not free will. There is no physical way it could be generated -- yet am persuaded it has to exist -- so I leave it at that -- I have no idea.

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Have you actually ever played a video game. The hand eye coordination between them would be considered free-will. A construct (your brain vs the virutal world it creates to determine a choice). Basically the relationship

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I've always seen the free will debate as on the same order as the debate about solipsism.

Those who say free will is an illusion might as well dig a big hole and jump in.

Maybe it wasn't meant for them to jump in. :P

And if you ever get in a "debate" with someone who doesn't believe in "Free-will" you can just say "maybe it wasn't meant for me to NOT believe in free-will"....

Seriously though, I'm happy that there is evidence for free-will now because I do not like the idea of being a puppet on a string and I think not believing in Free-will is a plan for the one world government.

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Very interesting. But I am a believer of free will. We think differently and so we all have our very own free will.

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Posted (edited)

Edited by The Id3al Experience

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