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Waspie_Dwarf

Blast Waves from Russian Meteor Crossed US

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Posted (edited)

Incoming! Then Outgoing! Waves Generated by Russian Meteor Recorded Crossing the U.S.

Network of stations with seismometers and air pressure sensors detected the blast waves

A network of seismographic stations recorded spectacular signals from the blast waves of the meteor that landed near Chelyabinsk, Russia, as the waves crossed the United States.

The National Science Foundation- (NSF) supported stations are used to study earthquakes and the Earth's deep interior.

While thousands of earthquakes around the globe are recorded by seismometers in these stations--part of the permanent Global Seismographic Network (GSN) and EarthScope's temporary Transportable Array (TA)--signals from large meteor impacts are far less common.

The meteor explosion near Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15, 2013, generated ground motions and air pressure waves in the atmosphere. The stations picked up the signals with seismometers and air pressure sensors

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted (edited)

If the meteor had burned up in Earth's atmosphere on 15th February next year, instead of 15th February this year, it would have burned up in the skies over northern Ireland and northern England instead of Chelyabinsk, which is on the same latitude.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun

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If the meteor had burned up in Earth's atmosphere on 15th February next year, instead of 15th February this year, it would have burned up in the skies over northern Ireland and northern England instead of Chelyabinsk, which is on the same latitude.

That would depend entirely on what time on that date it entered the atmosphere. Ten minutes makes a lot of difference on a planet that rotates at 1070 mph (at the equator).

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