Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
Still Waters

Fencing off wild lions 'could save them'

5 posts in this topic

Nearly half of Africa's wild lions are facing extinction in 20 to 40 years unless urgent conservation measures are put in place, a report suggests.

Writing in the journal Ecology Letters, conservationists have said that the big cats should be better protected from their main threat - humans.

They have proposed that fencing off the carnivores into nature reserves could protect them in the future.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-21687176

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't be surprised if this solution is used for other wildlife too. Ultimately Africa will turn into a gigantic open-air animal reserve. The food chains will collapse while different species are cordoned together behind fences and ultimately they'll need to be separated for their own survival too, turning Africa into a giant open-air zoo. Worst case would be extinction. It's so sad how mankind has run so many species into the ground in a relative blink of an eye in geological time.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would a lot of fensing to put up and upkeep. I guess then they would be suppled with game to hunt and water to drink.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poachers would tear down the fence so I don't think it would do much good. As human population grows many animals will become extinct or close to it.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might be easier and cheaper fence in the humans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.