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Ashotep

Canadian Arctic Glacier Melt

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Mar. 12, 2013 — Ongoing glacier loss in the Canadian high Arctic is accelerating and probably irreversible, new model projections by Lenaerts et al. suggest. The Canadian high Arctic is home to the largest clustering of glacier ice outside of Greenland and Antarctica -- 146,000 square kilometers (about 60,000 square miles) of glacier ice spread across 36,000 islands.

Canadian Arctic Glacier Melt Accelerating, Irreversible, Projections Suggest

Its a shame that this may be irreversible. A lot of wild life depend on conditions remaining relatively the same.

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Climate change is incessant, though the rate might change.

Whether mankind has contributed to it is the big question.

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Climate change is incessant, though the rate might change.

Whether mankind has contributed to it is the big question.

Not really.

Br Cornelius

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I don't think there is any question about mans involvement.

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It seems to me that man's contribution to the phenomenon cannot be denied, but I am no authority.

It is interesting that from our observations it seems that similar processes are at play on other planets in our solar system.

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It seems to me that man's contribution to the phenomenon cannot be denied, but I am no authority.

It is interesting that from our observations it seems that similar processes are at play on other planets in our solar system.

What other planets? This is news to me.
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The earth is not a slave to be whipped and beaten by a master. She will grab the whip and pull us into the flames.

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Posted (edited)

What other planets? This is news to me.

Just finished a terrific book, The Source Field Investigations. Can't remember the author at this moment, just published in 2012.

An amazing book and long. At the end as he is attempting to tie it all up he cites NASA data and others who regularly visually monitor planets, and over the last several decades, which is all the data that there is I guess, those observations suggest significant atmospheric change going on. Several planets as I recall.

So, it appears that the entire solar system is undergoing similar change to what we are? :-*

David Wilcock was his name.

Edited by Babe Ruth
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This would imply something going on either with the sun (for which I know of no evidence from solar observation) or in the solar system environment (what that might be I can't imagine).

My inclination then is to dismiss it; such observations may be accurate but not mean anything beyond that planets sometimes experience changes.

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Just finished a terrific book, The Source Field Investigations. Can't remember the author at this moment, just published in 2012.

An amazing book and long. At the end as he is attempting to tie it all up he cites NASA data and others who regularly visually monitor planets, and over the last several decades, which is all the data that there is I guess, those observations suggest significant atmospheric change going on. Several planets as I recall.

So, it appears that the entire solar system is undergoing similar change to what we are? :-*

David Wilcock was his name.

To try to draw any conclusions about the solar system from dataset's which are less than a century long (many less than a decade) is ridiculous and would not be tolerated if it was attempted in terrestrial climatology. What would have to be shown is that climate change is happening in all parts of the solar system in ways which cannot be correlated to normal planetary seasonal effects. Then you would have to establish the actual mechanism.

Br Cornelius

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All the data means is that change is constant. Not just on this planet, but on the others too. Nothing really profound there.

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All the data means is that change is constant. Not just on this planet, but on the others too. Nothing really profound there.

All change has a driver - the whole thing of climate science is to identify the drivers and there relative contributions.

When you have accounted for the natural drivers which have caused most historic climate change - you have to account for the residual and that is where mans effects on the planetary system come in.

Br Cornelius

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Agreed, and I wonder if there are drivers that man is not aware of?

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The earth is not a slave to be whipped and beaten by a master. She will grab the whip and pull us into the flames.

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Posted (edited)

Antarctica is gaining ice while the arctic is losing it. Feels more like a cycle to me. Could man influence climate? Sure. Do I think its enough to throw the earth into a premature cycle? No I don't think so. Not enough data. Do I think we are polluting the air quality. Yes I do. But any catastrophic climatic change may simply be a natural cycle. We are at the end of an ice age. Ice will recede. I'm still reading up to see if something convinces me otherwise but I'm just not entirely convinced yet. Besides from what a meteorologist friend of mine said is that if we change the climate in the way its being suggested we would actually see a new ice age start encroaching. The world would balance itself out again. I don't have all the answers though not even close... :)

Edited by Aus Der Box Skeptisch
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I think we are warming the earth, but I don't think it's something to panic over.

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By the time it gets so bad we do panic it might be too late. The oceans wouldn't have to warm up much before we had a mass methane release. They think that is what caused the Permian extinction, at least it was a big part of it and it almost wiped everything out.

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The fact that land based Arctic glaciers are in such dramatic retreat is a very bad sign. The loss of summer sea ice shows a clear trend, but could theoretically recover almost completely in a decade or less. The land based glaciers are much more resistant and have not been in such a state of retreat for thousands of years and would take a considerable amount of time to recover. They are really the Canary in the coal mine of climate change. This is all happening because climate change is concentrating in the high latitudes and the arctic circle especially with mean temperature increases of 2-3C, which is about three times the temperature rise of the whole planetary system.

Br Cornelius

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Yeah and Dinosaur farts could have warmed up the Earth too.

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Sometimes a video can say it much better then any words I could ever come up with. I give credit to the many brilliant minds that we coexist with:

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A video always explains it the best. The horses running along the beach were beautiful and so is Mother Earth, hope she stays that way.

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Posted (edited)

The Warm up of the Artic is indeed real and spells doom for species such as the polar bear,who are specifically adapted for Artic conditions.

Edited by shaddow134

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Every species takes millions of years to evolve, so its loss represents a huge amount of evolution gone down the tubes. Still, the vast majority of all species that have existed are extinct, and, until we came along, one of the most common causes of extinction was specialization -- becoming highly adapted to something in the environment that disappears when the environment changes.

Natural selection normally selects in favor of creatures that do a particular job better than others, so that the animal become better and better at it. This necessarily is at the cost of the ability to do other jobs as well. Two species competing in the same niche will either result in one becoming extinct or the two evolving specialties -- dividing the niche into smaller niches where each can specialize.

Polar bears are highly specialized to hunting in the arctic, in particular on the arctic sea ice. They appear to be doomed, although of course people will work on ways of saving them, if nothing else in modern zoos where they live full lives.

I'm not sure this bothers me much, except as a signal that things are not as they should be. The animals are the only mammalian predator known to actively hunt human beings. They also, as bears go, do not seem to have much sense, repeatedly getting themselves into trouble where other bears quickly learn.

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