Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2
Waspie_Dwarf

"Earths" in habitable zones common

9 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Earth-sized planets in habitable zones are more common than previously thought

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- The number of potentially habitable planets is greater than previously thought, according to a new analysis by a Penn State researcher, and some of those planets are likely lurking around nearby stars.

"We now estimate that if we were to look at 10 of the nearest small stars we would find about four potentially habitable planets, give or take," said Ravi Kopparapu, a post-doctoral researcher in geosciences. "That is a conservative estimate," he added. "There could be more."

Kopparapu detailed his findings in a paper accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters. In it, he recalculated the commonness of Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars, also known as cool stars or M-dwarfs.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We cannot be the only planet in the habitable zones, that has water,and a suitable atmosphere to support life,there has to be millions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The link to the article doesn't appear to be working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The link to the article doesn't appear to be working.

Thanks, it should be fixed now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Link now working, Thanks. Four habitable planets per ten M class stars, it says. That's about one for every 2.5 such stars. The three nearest such stars are Proxima Centauri, Barnard's star, and Wolf 359. One of these should, by this reckoning, have a habitable planet, and this, I read, is a conservative estimate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Proxima Centauri is thought to be about 4.85 billion years old, about 280 million years older than the Sun. Barnard's Star is estimated to be around 10 billion years old, over twice the Sun's age. Wolf 359 approximately 100- 300 million years old, very young by stellar standards. Either of the first two appear to have been around more than long enough to allow for the possibility of advanced, indigenous life. And all this within less than 8 light years.

Edited by bison

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Red dwarfs continue to present the two problems of frequent severe flaring and likely gravitational lock. This makes me question whether the presence of a "right" size planet or moon in the "habitable" zone of such stars means anything.

Of course if we can find them and identify them and get spectra, then we certainly should. Still, I am much more interested in the more difficult problem of finding earth-size objects around larger stars more like the sun. These of course will be less common but still numerous, although I am not aware of any studies predicting their liklihood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read several near death experience descriptions where they came back and said that our universe is "alive with life." And other NDE descriptions that have said our Universe was "made for life." A few have even said that they met other beings on the other side who were not from our planet.

Art

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Red dwarfs continue to present the two problems of frequent severe flaring and likely gravitational lock. This makes me question whether the presence of a "right" size planet or moon in the "habitable" zone of such stars means anything.

Of course if we can find them and identify them and get spectra, then we certainly should. Still, I am much more interested in the more difficult problem of finding earth-size objects around larger stars more like the sun. These of course will be less common but still numerous, although I am not aware of any studies predicting their liklihood.

Red dwarf stars have only recently been seriously considered to host potentially habitable planets. There is a good deal we don't know about how tidally locked planets might distribute the heat they receive, or shield themselves from stellar variability. It used to be believed that most M class stars were not flare stars. Now that is reversed; most, but not all, are suspected of large, short term variability. As we refine our knowledge, it will become clearer if some planets of some M class stars are truly habitable, or not. Edited by bison

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.