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TheLogic

Beginner to programming.

12 posts in this topic

I am currently studying IT at college and I am interested in learning a programming language.

I have no previous experience with programming and would like to know which language I should start with and if you have any text's that could help me along the way?

I'm hoping to gain an employment position in IT but I also just want to do it for fun.

Thank you :)

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Posted (edited)

Currently at my University it educates us very closely with real world scenarios. I'd recommend Java as that is a huge market from desktop programs to mobile applications. C is also a fundamental language to learn and is very much still in use today.

I unfortunately won't be able to link you my course notes due to copyright law. But there is a plethora of great tutorials out there for both.

Edited by Orcseeker
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As an introduction to object-oriented programming, I'd check out this site and the book it suggests. You'll need to install BlueJ as well, but it should be worth it in the end. It's the Java programming language, which is probably the most widely used.

You might want to check out Python as well. Their site provides many resources for new programmers and it's supposed to be one of the more simplified (but still very powerful) programming languages.

You might want to try learning something like C first (as was mentioned above), before OO languages, but I wouldn't bother. Most universities (such as mine) will start you off on some kind of OO language, maybe similar to the BlueJ learning environment.

I, too, am a beginner by the way.

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Currently at my University it educates us very closely with real world scenarios. I'd recommend Java as that is a huge market from desktop programs to mobile applications. C is also a fundamental language to learn and is very much still in use today.

I unfortunately won't be able to link you my course notes due to copyright law. But there is a plethora of great tutorials out there for both.

As an introduction to object-oriented programming, I'd check out this site and the book it suggests. You'll need to install BlueJ as well, but it should be worth it in the end. It's the Java programming language, which is probably the most widely used.

You might want to check out Python as well. Their site provides many resources for new programmers and it's supposed to be one of the more simplified (but still very powerful) programming languages.

You might want to try learning something like C first (as was mentioned above), before OO languages, but I wouldn't bother. Most universities (such as mine) will start you off on some kind of OO language, maybe similar to the BlueJ learning environment.

I, too, am a beginner by the way.

I have been told that C++ is a good starting point?

I have downloaded two ebooks based upon this language.

Is that a good starting point then?

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I would start with Java, but maybe someone with more experience might post to recommend c++. I know that universities Will teach Java and some python, but I guess it depends.

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I have been told that C++ is a good starting point?

I have downloaded two ebooks based upon this language.

Is that a good starting point then?

My university offers C++ as a later optional elective. I was firstly introduced to Java and assembly. The thing about C is that it is a fundamental language and many other languages are based off it or include a lot of syntax from it, even Java.

I know a few people who started on that language but it is really up to you and fine to start on C++.

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Posted (edited)

I would start with Java. Also if its possible i would recommend taking a Class, instead of teaching yourself since this stuff can become a headache if your new to programming in general.

Edited by stevemagegod

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You're studying IT at college...follow the college program then. No point in starting the same studies parallel to college. There's already enough to learn in one curriculum.

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You should learn programming logic First,It's the basis for learn every language,after you learn that,It's just a matter of adapting yourself to the laguange's syntax

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Our course doesn't teach programming so my tutor recommended I taught myself at home.

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My advice would actually be to learn HTML and Javascript.

HTML, because the Internet is the future (apparently - some people are starting to catch on to this).

Javascript, because Javascript is already the de facto UI manipulation language for HTML, and programmers - well.

Programmers are basically lazy. We're lazy enough that we're quite literally the kind of people that will write programs to do stuff so that we don't have to.

If we can get away with just using one language - then we will - and if you take a look at Node.js, for example - you'll see that's already started to happen.

Also - what MagicBob says is true. Learn to code and everything else is just syntax (which is only a Google search away).

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Our course doesn't teach programming so my tutor recommended I taught myself at home.

Ah ok, it's a course. I thought you meant a full IT study curriculum.

In this case i fully agree with Tiggs. HTML is the way to go, HTML5 to be more specific. It's also fully powered to replace flash so you can learn that as well and be near-future proof. And with that CSS of course. And javascript for you functions. Later you can build on to that with AJAX if you wish to go further.

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