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Still Waters

The real witch hunters

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Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is the latest film to appeal to an audience fascination with the macabre. But witch hunters are not mere figments of Hollywood's imagination. They have their place in our own history, just a few hundred years ago.

On the night of 24 March 1645, Matthew Hopkins and John Stearne visited the home of Elizabeth Clarke in the small Essex town of Manningtree.

The 80-year-old woman, poor and with a missing leg, had the misfortune to be accused of witchcraft at a time when bizarre but damning evidence was easy for a zealous witch hunter to find.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...tory/0/21548716

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We used to have a cat named Pyewackett (after one of 'Mother' Elizabeth's imps). *peers fearfully through curtains at the sound of horses' hooves!*

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We used to have a cat named Pyewackett (after one of 'Mother' Elizabeth's imps). *peers fearfully through curtains at the sound of horses' hooves!*

Pyewackett was also the name of the cat (familiar) in the Jimmy Stewart movie "Bell, Book and Candle"...

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Sometimes the hunter needs to be the hunted.

If all it takes is to have a mole to be accused then half the people on the planet must be witches.

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People always talk about the Salem witch trials which only lasted one year with 33 people convicted. They totally disregard the thousands of people that were burned at the stake, over hundreds of years, as witches in Europe.

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I find it interesting that one of the descriptors for which women were typically accused of witchcraft was a papist.

Michelle, to be honest, I hardly know anything about the Salem Witch trials.

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Pyewackett was also the name of the cat (familiar) in the Jimmy Stewart movie "Bell, Book and Candle"...

Kim Novak....Yummy!

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I find it interesting that one of the descriptors for which women were typically accused of witchcraft was a papist.

Michelle, to be honest, I hardly know anything about the Salem Witch trials.

It's right up there with slavery as one of the great atrocities the US has commited. :rolleyes:

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As a witch myself I am extremely glad that witch hunts are a thing of the past (at least in most countries). Thousands of women (not just witches) were killed by people just pointing the finger and accusing.

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Posted (edited)

As a witch myself I am extremely glad that witch hunts are a thing of the past (at least in most countries). Thousands of women (not just witches) were killed by people just pointing the finger and accusing.

In a village in Northern England (where I am from) they still have a "Ducking Pond", where old ladies accused of witchcraft were taken.Legend has is that they were submerged in the water and if they survived 5 minutes under they were set free.Of course if the time keeper was paid £2.00 in silver,(a fortune thosedays) by relatives of the old lady, the time was considerably shortened,and they survived to be banned from the village forever.The records of these events(written by the local Vicar) is now in a museum in Durham. Edited by spud the mackem
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I find it interesting that one of the descriptors for which women were typically accused of witchcraft was a papist.

Sounds fair to me. (only joking)

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I find it interesting that one of the descriptors for which women were typically accused of witchcraft was a papist.

Michelle, to be honest, I hardly know anything about the Salem Witch trials.

This may be of interest then, Kasey.... http://www.localhist....org/salem.html

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In a village in Northern England (where I am from) they still have a "Ducking Pond", where old ladies accused of witchcraft were taken.Legend has is that they were submerged in the water and if they survived 5 minutes under they were set free.Of course if the time keeper was paid £2.00 in silver,(a fortune thosedays) by relatives of the old lady, the time was considerably shortened,and they survived to be banned from the village forever.The records of these events(written by the local Vicar) is now in a museum in Durham.

Where abouts is this ducking pond? I'm from Leeds :)

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Where abouts is this ducking pond? I'm from Leeds :)

A small village North of Sunderland, but its 30 years since I was there so its probably under a new housing estate.A lot of village ponds were used as "Ducking" ponds,in the middle ages,as the people were uneducated and superstitious,and the areas were run by ruthless Lords/Earls,with their minions controlling the ordinary folk.My area was controlled by a Lord Lambton, and Lambton Castle is now a National Trust property,but the family still lives there.
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They were all fearful folk that couldn't see past the zealous beliefs they were taught and brainwashed with since birth. The so-called witches were unfortunate victims, but a lot is unfortunate when you're dealing with an overly mislead "flock"

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Posted (edited)

Ealdwita snippet........

The Ducking stool and ponds weren't used in witchcraft trials, they were punishment for 'scolds', dishonest tradesmen, and brewers or bakers who sold bad produce.

"Then was the Scold herself,

In a wheelbarrow brought,

Stripped naked to the smock,

As in that case she ought:

Neats tongues about her neck

Were hung in open show;

And thus unto the ducking stool

This famous scold did go."

(Ballad, anon. "The Ducking of a Scold" - c.1615)

Amazingly, Ducking was still legal punishment for scolds in New Jersey until 1972!

'Water trials' in the case of witches consisted of attaching weights to the accused and dropping them into the river from a bridge etc., and if he/she floated - they were declared guilty, because Satan was 'looking after his own'! If they sank, they were 'proved innocent' - but drowned!

Edited by ealdwita
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Thousands of women (not just witches) were killed by people just pointing the finger and accusing.

Not just women, MG :no:

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As a witch myself I am extremely glad that witch hunts are a thing of the past (at least in most countries). Thousands of women (not just witches) were killed by people just pointing the finger and accusing.

What kind of witch are you ?,or are you just saying this to be different.Old Mother Shipton was said to be a witch,she lived in a cave near Knaresborough in Yorkshire,her cave can still be visited.Hubble bubble toil and trouble,fires burn and cauldrons bubble.(Macbeth).I don t think anyone takes "witches" seriously these days.They are only scary to young children.

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Been to Salem many times. It was barbaric. I went up to the hanging hill . Creepy . Very haunted, all over the place there .

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Sounds fair to me. (only joking)

Many were herbalists and healers . They played with potions etc. I think some were targeted by newly emerging western medicine practitioners ,to get rid of the competition . Feh

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Not just women, MG :no:

Not just humans.

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Not just women, MG :no:

You are absolutely true there!

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What kind of witch are you ?,or are you just saying this to be different.Old Mother Shipton was said to be a witch,she lived in a cave near Knaresborough in Yorkshire,her cave can still be visited.Hubble bubble toil and trouble,fires burn and cauldrons bubble.(Macbeth).I don t think anyone takes "witches" seriously these days.They are only scary to young children.

Well I have a cauldron if that helps label me lol :)

I'm a solitary witch mostly. I do spells, celebrate the sabbats and esbats, honour nature, honour the Gods and Goddesses. I'm currently learning a lot more about herb lore to create my own simple potions.

I'm a witch, because this is my path. I don't care if people take it seriously or not. I'd never push my lifestyle on someone, but if they asked I would be happy to tell them.

Oh and most people in my life know I am a witch, but this doesn't seem to scare my kids or their friends (or their parents), they all seem very happy to spend lots of time at our house :)

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Some we hanged earlier.....

witches.jpg

.....and one we...er...didn't......

Wicked-Witches.jpg

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Well I have a cauldron if that helps label me lol :)

I'm a solitary witch mostly. I do spells, celebrate the sabbats and esbats, honour nature, honour the Gods and Goddesses. I'm currently learning a lot more about herb lore to create my own simple potions.

I'm a witch, because this is my path. I don't care if people take it seriously or not. I'd never push my lifestyle on someone, but if they asked I would be happy to tell them.

Oh and most people in my life know I am a witch, but this doesn't seem to scare my kids or their friends (or their parents), they all seem very happy to spend lots of time at our house :)

Well everyone has to occupy their time in some way.Good luck with your herbs.
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