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Ohelemapit

Is feeding your children raw vegan diet nuts

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For any parent struggling to get a child to sit straight at the dinner table, it may seem like advice that is, well, divorced from reality.

In her new recipe book, serialised in The Mail on Sunday, Gwyneth Paltrow admits that not only does she avoid eating pasta, dairy, sugar, bread and rice, but her children Apple, eight, and Moses, six, often follow a similar diet.

Internet chat rooms were filled with mothers, agog – where would they be without failsafes such as toast, pizza and risotto? As well as being met with derision from parents, Gwyneth’s comments attracted criticism from many health experts who labelled her ‘foolish’. But is her approach as bonkers as it sounds? Perhaps not.

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Where to start?! :D

I am vegan apart from eating a couple of free-range eggs per week(that come from hens I know personally!), and about a quarter of my diet is raw(higher proportion in summer). The rest is cooked as little as possible. I don't smoke or drink alcohol. My diet is also sugar-free and I think this is a good place to start when trying to have a healthier diet. Once the 'jangley' sugar-craving has gone it's much easier to appreciate veggies.

Raw food is the best food because it is natural ......... AS LONG AS IT IS ORGANIC!! This is very important. The more refined a food is, the more additives there are, the more your body is put under stress trying to process that 'rubbish'(the body uses up energy and resources with no benefit).

And just to dispel the myth of limp, pasty-looking vegetarians: my vegetarian god-daughter has qualified to do cross-country running at County level and her vegetarian brother enters Iron Man contests and rows competitively.

The only thing you have to be careful with in small children is giving them too much fibre.

Dairy products have been linked to asthma for decades! They also increase mucus levels and lead people to have blocked noses and congested chests.

Makes me laugh that in the article they warn about putting children on 'exclusion diets' ........ as if excluding the things that are giving them chronic illnesses, limiting their (healthy)energy and making them nervy and anxious or aggressive is a bad thing!

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My reaction is that you go overboard and should practice moderation. All the things you avoid are harmful when overdone, some harmful even in small amounts in some people. Certainly smoking and alcohol and all that sugar-water should be avoided, but let the child be a child and have some ice cream and cake and candy and even pizza now and then.

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I am a vegetarian, have been my whole life, except for a couple of years do to pressure from someone else. As long as they are healthy and growing there is nothing wrong with it. Ouija Ouija, do you eat sugars like honey, maple syrup, molasses, etc?

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Ouija, do you get enough B vitamins? Take any supplements, particularly B12?

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Posted (edited)

I sometimes amuses me to read that vegans have to ingest man-made chemicals (vitamin tablets etc) to suppliment their diet when most, if not all of those vitamins are available in a well-balanced omnivorous food intake!

Mind you, IMO calling your kids 'Moses' and 'Apple' is an even greater cause for alarm!!! Huh - trendies!

Edited by ealdwita
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Hey guys! Love this topic! :clap:

We raise free range hens for eggs, and let me tell you, once you use free range eggs, you don't go back to the store bought kind. We're talking about getting a milk cow...fresh raw milk is delicious. We try to buy organic, and if we don't I READ the ingredients! Even if it's "organic" READ the ingredients! You'd be surprised at some of the brands out there, and their ingredients really aren't bad. I never let my two year old have anything that has High Fructose Corn Syrup in it. And he eats lots of fruits and veggies. Not big on red meat. Likes chicken and turkey, but otherwise, not a big meat eater. I'm not big on meat either. Never have really liked it. But, my husband thinks you have to have meat at every meal...sigh...

It's always a big treat for our family to go to Whole Foods once a month...Who would ever have thought Organic Pizza could taste so good... :yes:

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Most of the ingredients that sound so scary are preservatives, so odds are your corpse will last longer after you die.

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There is widely available here in Vietnam what are called quail eggs, although I think in fact they come from pigeons (you know -- marketing). I wonder if anyone knows about them. They are quite a treat hard-boiled with a little salt/pepper (salt and pepper here are served mixed together in the same shaker).

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I have been seriously thinking of going vegan for some time now. I am a meat eater though so it will be a hard conversion. I'll probably end up mixing it up and buy organic meat once in a while. I breaks my heart to watch my kids eat processed foods. I have won the High Fructose Corn Syrup war in my home. One day after asking my wife several times not to buy anything with it, I ended up dumping a bunch of juices she bought down the drain.

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We had a similar war here about MSG. Having visited the States a lot I picked up that it was bad for you, so I banned it from our kitchen. Wow! You have no idea how important that stuff is to Asian cooks. They were smuggling it in and hiding it.

Well I guess they were right and I was wrong. It's not all that bad for you after all, and probably better, ounce for ounce, than regular salt. Moderation I guess is the way to go.

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One of the joys of owning a small farm with a non-specific rating (growing all sorts of things rather than a single crop), is that all our veg, and most of our fruit is organic(ish), and thanks to one of my tenants having a small accredited herd of Frisians, all our milk is unpasteurised. Our chickens are all free-range (we get the grandchildren searching for eggs in the morning - the hens seem to lay them where they please!) We are lucky enough to have an old-fashioned family butcher in the village for pork, lamb and beef etc, and all our other meat - rabbit, wild boar, game birds and fish is supplied - ahem - (poached!) by 'a man'

Living off leaves, tubers and pills seems to me to be a very high price to pay for a few extra years of life spent as a dribbling vegetable in front of a TV set in some old folks home!

"A short life and a merry one, old buck"

(Wilfred Owen - 1893-1918)

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My rule of thumb on ingredients: If I can't pronounce it, it doesn't go in my body! :D

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One of the joys of owning a small farm with a non-specific rating (growing all sorts of things rather than a single crop), is that all our veg, and most of our fruit is organic(ish), and thanks to one of my tenants having a small accredited herd of Frisians, all our milk is unpasteurised. Our chickens are all free-range (we get the grandchildren searching for eggs in the morning - the hens seem to lay them where they please!) We are lucky enough to have an old-fashioned family butcher in the village for pork, lamb and beef etc, and all our other meat - rabbit, wild boar, game birds and fish is supplied - ahem - (poached!) by 'a man'

Living off leaves, tubers and pills seems to me to be a very high price to pay for a few extra years of life spent as a dribbling vegetable in front of a TV set in some old folks home!

"A short life and a merry one, old buck"

(Wilfred Owen - 1893-1918)

Oh man, you are living my dream. Id love nothing more then to live on a small farm and raise my own food. Dig a huge pond and raise fish ect ect. That would be great.

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One of the joys of owning a small farm with a non-specific rating (growing all sorts of things rather than a single crop), is that all our veg, and most of our fruit is organic(ish), and thanks to one of my tenants having a small accredited herd of Frisians, all our milk is unpasteurised. Our chickens are all free-range (we get the grandchildren searching for eggs in the morning - the hens seem to lay them where they please!) We are lucky enough to have an old-fashioned family butcher in the village for pork, lamb and beef etc, and all our other meat - rabbit, wild boar, game birds and fish is supplied - ahem - (poached!) by 'a man'

Living off leaves, tubers and pills seems to me to be a very high price to pay for a few extra years of life spent as a dribbling vegetable in front of a TV set in some old folks home!

"A short life and a merry one, old buck"

(Wilfred Owen - 1893-1918)

Is unpasteurised milk not dangerous?

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Is unpasteurised milk not dangerous?

'Accredited' herds (usually Herefords for some reason), have their health and condition very strictly monitored which enables their milk to be marketed without pasteurisation. There aren't many in the UK now but we're lucky to be near one of them.

Oh man, you are living my dream. Id love nothing more then to live on a small farm and raise my own food. Dig a huge pond and raise fish ect ect. That would be great.

Damned hard work sometimes preacher, and for little reward! That's why we've diversified with a riding school, and host game-shooting parties in season. Still, it has its compensations. No fish pond, but there's trout in the stream below Lower Field.

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Posted (edited)

I am a vegetarian, have been my whole life, except for a couple of years do to pressure from someone else. As long as they are healthy and growing there is nothing wrong with it. Ouija Ouija, do you eat sugars like honey, maple syrup, molasses, etc?

I don't eat any sugars at all, not even fruit since I became borderline diabetic.

Ouija, do you get enough B vitamins? Take any supplements, particularly B12?

No, they're a waste of money!

"A short life and a merry one, old buck"

(Wilfred Owen - 1893-1918)

'Amen' to that! :yes:

My rule of thumb on ingredients: If I can't pronounce it, it doesn't go in my body! :D

Brilliant!

Edited by ouija ouija
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Posted (edited)

Is unpasteurised milk not dangerous?

only if the animal is sick or if you leave it out and let it spoil, otherwise it should be fine to drink (disclaimer, if you do get sick, don't blame me XD ).

Edited by Bavarian Raven
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Posted (edited)

Of course, humans aren't supposed to be vegetarians. Humans are omnivores not herbivores. This means that the healthiest diet for the human body is an omnivorous diet of both vegetables AND meat, not one or the other.

What these stupid parents don't realise is that whilst their vegan diet may be making them and their kids feel healthier, such an effect is only a short-term effect. Over the long-term, however, such a diet eventually causes problems.

And what are the health problems caused by a vegan diet? Here they are:

  • inadequate milk production for nursing mothers, as well as retarded physical and mental development in some children who are strictly on a vegan or raw food diet (someone especially needs to let the parents in that article know about this);
  • slow metabolism leading to a much less robust lifestyle;
  • a general lack of vitality;
  • low body temperature (always cold);
  • a weak, touchy digestive system with a loss of digestive strength (unable to metabolize food quickly, have to be careful what you eat, how much, must practice food combining to be able to digest food, etc.);
  • food cravings (especially among women);
  • stalled weight loss because metabolism is too low (predominately in women);
  • inability to gain weight, resulting in shrunken, cadaverous-looking bodies (predominately in men);
  • weight gains from overeating on carbohydrates;
  • amenorrhea (menstrual cycles cease), even in young women;
  • loss of libido;
  • hair loss and nail problems;
  • dental cavities, tooth loss, and gum problems;
  • joint pain
  • inability to conceive

So these parents may think they are making themselves and their children healthier by eating only vegetables and shunning meat and dairy products, but they are doing so only in the shortiterm. If they keep doing it then their health will start to become worse due to them not receiving all the proper vitamins and minerals they need and they could start suffering some quite serious health problems.

Hopefully this post will shock any vegans reading it into changing their diet to include meat and dairy products.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun
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Posted (edited)

Raw food is the best food because it is natural

No, it isn't. Do you realise the harm you are doing by only eating raw food?

Vegans persist in thinking that eating only raw food is good for you because they believe it is "natural". After all, aren't animals SUPPOSED to eat only raw food?

In fact scientists such as evolutionary biologists are now of the opinion that humans have been used to eating cooked food for such a long time - a few million years - that the human body now needs cooked food to stay healthy. Evolution has caused us to need cooked food.

Studies have suggested that eating meat and COOKING food made us human, enabling the brains of our prehuman ancestors to grow dramatically over a period of a few million years, making us the extremely intelligent species we are today. It would have been biologically implausible for humans to evolve such a large brain on a raw, vegan diet and that meat-eating was a crucial element of human evolution at least 1 million years before the dawn of homo sapiens.

Denise Minger wrote about the dangers of eating only raw food in her book "Raw Gone Wrong, When the Honeymoon is Over":

"…Almost without fail, the beginning of the diet yields a brilliant honeymoon phase—filled with surging energy, renewed vigor, and zest for your lively cuisine.

But somewhere down the line—months for some people, years for others—the wonder starts to wane. Maybe you start feeling like something is inexplicably missing. Maybe your energy takes a dive and noontime naps become the norm. Maybe your weight loss plateaus. Maybe your last dentist visit wasn’t so pretty. Maybe those niggly health problems you had prior to raw—aches and pains, lethargy, allergies, arthritis, skin conditions—start resurfacing out of nowhere. Whatever the reason, raw just doesn’t seem to be working as well as it did in the beginning. Your enthusiasm diminishes, and in its place comes doubt, discontentment, and a plethora of questions.

In other words, you start seeing raw foods’ freaky nose hairs and you begin to wonder: what did I get myself into?

My own raw honeymoon ended around the one-year mark. Intermittent fatigue, dental woes, hair loss, concentration problems, and some not-so-happy blood test results forced me to rethink the dietary regimen I was so tightly clutching. During this time, I started scouting out the counsel and wisdom of other disgruntled rawbies. What I discovered was this “honeymoon end” was a common phenomenon among raw foodists, and that its occurrence usually led to two things:

1. an expulsion from the raw community for being a dissenter or pot-stirrer for doubting the diet, and

2. a foray into other dietary regimens, such as paleo, low-carb, cooked vegan, macrobiotic, or ayurvedic."

Edited by TheLastLazyGun
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Posted (edited)

Certainly healthy eating is better, so cutting out the cr @ p they sell in plastic boxes with unpronounceable names is a good way to start. But not all "natural' is good for humans, so its trial and error.

People have allergies to certain natural things which only goes to show that just because it is natural does not always mean it is there for humans to eat as a rule.

I am not saying have processed or man made only, i am saying that those who swear by nuts and pulses must see that its not for everyone.

Edited by freetoroam
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~*Great post cut so as not to take up as much room!*~

I would also add to this the fact that you cannot get all of the vitamins you need from a vegan diet (B12 particularly, D also) unless you eat artifically fortified foods should be evidence that we are not supposed to be vegans.

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Posted (edited)

Where to start?! :D

I am vegan apart from eating a couple of free-range eggs per week(that come from hens I know personally!), and about a quarter of my diet is raw(higher proportion in summer). The rest is cooked as little as possible. I don't smoke or drink alcohol. My diet is also sugar-free and I think this is a good place to start when trying to have a healthier diet. Once the 'jangley' sugar-craving has gone it's much easier to appreciate veggies.

Raw food is the best food because it is natural ......... AS LONG AS IT IS ORGANIC!! This is very important. The more refined a food is, the more additives there are, the more your body is put under stress trying to process that 'rubbish'(the body uses up energy and resources with no benefit).

And just to dispel the myth of limp, pasty-looking vegetarians: my vegetarian god-daughter has qualified to do cross-country running at County level and her vegetarian brother enters Iron Man contests and rows competitively.

The only thing you have to be careful with in small children is giving them too much fibre.

Dairy products have been linked to asthma for decades! They also increase mucus levels and lead people to have blocked noses and congested chests.

Makes me laugh that in the article they warn about putting children on 'exclusion diets' ........ as if excluding the things that are giving them chronic illnesses, limiting their (healthy)energy and making them nervy and anxious or aggressive is a bad thing!

Well said. :tu:

No, it isn't. Do you realise the harm you are doing by only eating raw food?

Vegans persist in thinking that eating only raw food is good for you because they believe it is "natural". After all, aren't animals SUPPOSED to eat only raw food?

In fact scientists such as evolutionary biologists are now of the opinion that humans have been used to eating cooked food for such a long time - a few million years - that the human body now needs cooked food to stay healthy. Evolution has caused us to need cooked food.

Studies have suggested that eating meat and COOKING food made us human, enabling the brains of our prehuman ancestors to grow dramatically over a period of a few million years, making us the extremely intelligent species we are today. It would have been biologically implausible for humans to evolve such a large brain on a raw, vegan diet and that meat-eating was a crucial element of human evolution at least 1 million years before the dawn of homo sapiens.

Denise Minger wrote about the dangers of eating only raw food in her book "Raw Gone Wrong, When the Honeymoon is Over":

"…Almost without fail, the beginning of the diet yields a brilliant honeymoon phase—filled with surging energy, renewed vigor, and zest for your lively cuisine.

But somewhere down the line—months for some people, years for others—the wonder starts to wane. Maybe you start feeling like something is inexplicably missing. Maybe your energy takes a dive and noontime naps become the norm. Maybe your weight loss plateaus. Maybe your last dentist visit wasn’t so pretty. Maybe those niggly health problems you had prior to raw—aches and pains, lethargy, allergies, arthritis, skin conditions—start resurfacing out of nowhere. Whatever the reason, raw just doesn’t seem to be working as well as it did in the beginning. Your enthusiasm diminishes, and in its place comes doubt, discontentment, and a plethora of questions.

In other words, you start seeing raw foods’ freaky nose hairs and you begin to wonder: what did I get myself into?

My own raw honeymoon ended around the one-year mark. Intermittent fatigue, dental woes, hair loss, concentration problems, and some not-so-happy blood test results forced me to rethink the dietary regimen I was so tightly clutching. During this time, I started scouting out the counsel and wisdom of other disgruntled rawbies. What I discovered was this “honeymoon end” was a common phenomenon among raw foodists, and that its occurrence usually led to two things:

1. an expulsion from the raw community for being a dissenter or pot-stirrer for doubting the diet, and

2. a foray into other dietary regimens, such as paleo, low-carb, cooked vegan, macrobiotic, or ayurvedic."

Actually cooking most food kills the goodness.

You always post very elitist stuff... Makes me wonder about your agenda. I'm not the first person to notice this either.

Anyway i eat raw and I'm probably a lot stronger and healthier than you.

I would also add to this the fact that you cannot get all of the vitamins you need from a vegan diet (B12 particularly, D also) unless you eat artifically fortified foods should be evidence that we are not supposed to be vegans.

http://www.naturalne..._B12_vegan.html

People who state thta about Vitimin B12 are listening to media propaganda. If you know how B12 works you will know that is wrong.

As for Vitamin D, there is this big Yellow thing in the sky that gives you it. If you don't wear sunscreen it is really good for you and prevents cancers... (not gives you cancer like pharmaceutical companies try to tell you)

Anyway Spirulina gives you B12, protein and iron. I use that and I certainly don't suffer from B12 deficiency.

Do you know how much money pharmaceutical industry, Meat industry and Processed Food industry make, their worst nightmare is people being smart enough to eat properly and them lose out on creating cancer and other diseases then making you pay stupid amounts to try and stop it.

Edited by Coffey
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Me and my kids eat whatever we want really. We eat meat, eggs, cheese, milk, fruit, veg, chocolate, sweets, pizza and even chicken nuggets if we fancy.

They don't have pizza and sweets every day, they have them as treats.

They get plenty of fresh air and time spent running and playing. I think everything in moderation is fine.

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Posted (edited)

Just make sure they get enough protein in their diets...especially if you have young male children. Without meat, it may be more difficult for them to put on muscle mass as they get older. Ah, and since there are several species of plants that contain phytoestrogens, might want to keep your male kids away from those as well. Also, B12 cannot be properly absorbed by the body if you do not have adequate species of gut bacteria to absorb it. People who have been on long term antibiotics have a tendency to lack B12 in proper amounts as a result.

Edited by WoIverine
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