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OverSword

Portugal 12 years after decriminalization

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Just finished both parts and besides the gov. saving money, it sounded to me like a basic win win situation for everyone.

I've preached decriminalization for years and can only hope that with the progress made in Washington and Colorado the rest of the country will start catching up.

Sadly, here in Santa Rosa County,Florida, a joint will still put you in jail.

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Just finished both parts and besides the gov. saving money, it sounded to me like a basic win win situation for everyone.

I've preached decriminalization for years and can only hope that with the progress made in Washington and Colorado the rest of the country will start catching up.

Sadly, here in Santa Rosa County,Florida, a joint will still put you in jail.

Well in WA and CO we didn't decriminilize drugs, we legalized MJ for recreational use, so that's a little different. We're just as far as the rest of the nation is from writing people a $15.00 ticket for heroine posession.
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Well in WA and CO we didn't decriminilize drugs, we legalized MJ for recreational use, so that's a little different. We're just as far as the rest of the nation is from writing people a $15.00 ticket for heroine posession.

Actually OverSword I was just referring to "reefer". The thought of Herion or cocaine ever being de-criminalized in this country , is just to far out for me to be able to even consider, at least in my life time.

And congradulations on your states progressive stand, smoke one for me! Hell, smoke one for all the "consumers" still burdened with out dated laws and policies.

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i just cannot understand people when they go on about legalising drugs. like this quote in the opening post.

What???? you mean this action didn't destroy the country and turn its citizens into herion addicts?
like proof if poof were needed we can all go easy on drugs. dont people understand that to have a professional functioning work force you cannot have a large swath of the population dependent on drugs. the whole of the developed world as a war on drugs costing billions and why is this? its because having a lackluster drug policy is akin to economic suicide add to this which foreign investor, were their laws on drugs is much severe is going to invest in a country were such lax drug laws apply. this is why the developed world continues with the war on drugs. otherwise they'd have already leagalised it all and charge tax. so think about.

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Posted (edited)

i just cannot understand people when they go on about legalising drugs. like this quote in the opening post. like proof if poof were needed we can all go easy on drugs. dont people understand that to have a professional functioning work force you cannot have a large swath of the population dependent on drugs. the whole of the developed world as a war on drugs costing billions and why is this? its because having a lackluster drug policy is akin to economic suicide add to this which foreign investor, were their laws on drugs is much severe is going to invest in a country were such lax drug laws apply. this is why the developed world continues with the war on drugs. otherwise they'd have already leagalised it all and charge tax. so think about.

But you don't end up with 'swathes' of people going to work doped up. In fact, there would most likely be no notable increase in the number of people who do drugs, and definitely not those who do drugs regularly. If someone wants to take something, they will whether it's legal or not. In reality, it actually plays a part in decreasing serious substance abuse - drug use decreases. This is what is being found.

In your nightmare scenario the Red Light District in Amsterdam would be far more literal, because they'd all be too drugged up to fix a fault in the traffic lights. Nothing would get done, ever. Yet in reality, Amsterdam is a wonderful and extremely productive city.

What about alcohol? I know it's an old comparison, but it's an entirely legitimate one. Alcohol is worse than all illegal drugs combined, yet it is socially acceptable (thanks to the media) and perfectly legal (thanks to taxes).

Why do we have this massive anti-drugs campaign? Well, at first it was at the behest of alcohol companies - with regards to weed - but now it is largely because it is a massive industry in itself. If drugs were to be legalised, there would be hundreds of thousands, if not million's of people out of work. And this is actually the only "legitimate" reason that exists for keeping up the war on drugs. Can you imagine the party that dares legalise them, only to see unemployment rise by a full %?They would never see power in government again. This is why they are illegal - for political reasons - not due to the harm they cause.

Edited by ExpandMyMind
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I have always thought the best thing to do is to legalise all drugs, then tax them.

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But you don't end up with 'swathes' of people going to work doped up. In fact, there would most likely be no notable increase in the number of people who do drugs, and definitely not those who do drugs regularly. If someone wants to take something, they will whether it's legal or not. In reality, it actually plays a part in decreasing serious substance abuse - drug use decreases. This is what is being found.

In your nightmare scenario the Red Light District in Amsterdam would be far more literal, because they'd all be too drugged up to fix a fault in the traffic lights. Nothing would get done, ever. Yet in reality, Amsterdam is a wonderful and extremely productive city.

What about alcohol? I know it's an old comparison, but it's an entirely legitimate one. Alcohol is worse than all illegal drugs combined, yet it is socially acceptable (thanks to the media) and perfectly legal (thanks to taxes).

Why do we have this massive anti-drugs campaign? Well, at first it was at the behest of alcohol companies - with regards to weed - but now it is largely because it is a massive industry in itself. If drugs were to be legalised, there would be hundreds of thousands, if not million's of people out of work. And this is actually the only "legitimate" reason that exists for keeping up the war on drugs. Can you imagine the party that dares legalise them, only to see unemployment rise by a full %?They would never see power in government again. This is why they are illegal - for political reasons - not due to the harm they cause.

I agree. :tu:

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I have always thought the best thing to do is to legalise all drugs, then tax them.

Yeah, we could do this, then put all the extra money accumulated from taxes (anything above VAT) directly back into tackling the health problems caused by drug misuse- both mental and physical - as well as treating properly those with addiction. And we could do the same with alcohol and tobacco, which would ease the NHS (for us over here) considerably. It's actually quite logical when you think about it: users of drugs, instead of the taxpayer, would essentially be paying for their own private healthcare to treat the health problems that come with abusing drugs. And also, extra finances going towards treating properly the people with addiction problems would, most likely, produce the result of far less users. The government would still be gaining money through VAT from the extra products on the market. Plus, as with any consumable product, all drugs would then have to be tested and so would be far safer for the user.

I can't see many downsides.

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Yeah, we could do this, then put all the extra money accumulated from taxes (anything above VAT) directly back into tackling the health problems caused by drug misuse- both mental and physical - as well as treating properly those with addiction. And we could do the same with alcohol and tobacco, which would ease the NHS (for us over here) considerably. It's actually quite logical when you think about it: users of drugs, instead of the taxpayer, would essentially be paying for their own private healthcare to treat the health problems that come with abusing drugs. And also, extra finances going towards treating properly the people with addiction problems would, most likely, produce the result of far less users. The government would still be gaining money through VAT from the extra products on the market. Plus, as with any consumable product, all drugs would then have to be tested and so would be far safer for the user.

I can't see many downsides.

Its the same as protistution in my eyes, people are always gonna do drugs and have sex. Better it be in the open, regulated, taxed.

Fact is, if you wanted to you can do get drugs, if I wanted to do crack it would take maybe 2 hours in rough bars in town to find me some, this is the case for everyone everywhere. People will always do it so why not regualate and tax it? Health concerns are gonna be there anyways, but I dont think making it legal would make everyone rush out to get hooked on Crystal Meth.

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Can anyone in Portugal afford a smoke? (lol)

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Can anyone in Portugal afford a smoke? (lol)

Why, yes we can, thanks for asking (lol)

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Ever since the consumption of light drugs was de-criminalized, I basically stopped watching people dragging their sorry asses in the street.

I personalty think drugs (except the heavy ones) should be fully legalized and taxed, just like any other commodity.

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It comes a point where some drugs are actually a problem to the user rather than a recreational or even practical substance. For drugs like heroin you should consider opening up clinics rather than sell and tax them and offer treatment, destigmatisation of the practise and eradicate the fear of being arrested while pulling them out of the self destructive sub culture heroin creates.

http://sciencenordic.com/heroin-clinics-improve-addicts-lives

As for marijuana. Simply provide a cheaper or break even price from the street alternative while maintaining similar or overall better quality and you've got it down pat.

@stevewinn A population dependent on drugs simply due to legalisation or decriminalisation? What is stopping people take it in countries where they are illegalised? Not much really. Also what you are saying is rather to the extreme.

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It comes a point where some drugs are actually a problem to the user rather than a recreational or even practical substance. For drugs like heroin you should consider opening up clinics rather than sell and tax them and offer treatment, destigmatisation of the practise and eradicate the fear of being arrested while pulling them out of the self destructive sub culture heroin creates.

http://sciencenordic...e-addicts-lives

It´s not about heroin, but cocain, the following article, treating adiction with laser.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403131348.htm

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In all countries, the policy of prohibition does far more harm to society, users and nonusers alike, than does drug use itself.

The people that want to use the illegal drugs WILL do so, no matter the law. Is it better to have gun-toting criminals sell these substances, or regulated and tax paying entities?

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Sadly, here in Santa Rosa County,Florida, a joint will still put you in jail.

Yet use, especially by teenagers, is still way up in our county. I wonder why harsh, punishing laws for victimless crimes doesn't prevent said crimes? /sarcasm

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Why is the system so resistant to change? Why is the status quo so powerful?

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