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Still Waters

Hunt is on for the grave of queen Boudicca

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Just weeks after remains found under a car park were confirmed as Richard III and archaeologists have reportedly stumbled on Alfred the Great, now the hunt is on to find Boudicca.

The grave of warrior queen, who fought the Romans to defend Britain, is unknown - although it is thought that her bones lay near what is now a McDonald's in Birmingham.

Another theory suggests that the flame-haired leader of the Iceni lies beneath either platform eight, nine or 10 at King's Cross Station.

http://www.dailymail...rior-queen.html

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I was just reading about Boudicca last night ... I think her Majesty is coming home.

Victory !

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I'd heard that it was King's Cross station, although I suppose that might be Dumbledore. :(

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Would be nice if they could find her grave.

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Torcs were first found at Snettisham in 1948 and 1950, and experts thought no more were buried there. Then in 1990, metal detectorist Charles Hodder found 9 kilograms of gold and silver fragments and ingots at the site. He reported his finds and helped archaeologists excavate the field. They unearthed seventy-five complete torcs, carefully buried in small pits.

The Snettisham Hoard

I'm sure they know there is more where this came from, finding Her grave might give clues to more to recover.

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When I was a kid we called her Boadicea and now she is Boudicca.. ?????

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Posted (edited)

Boadicea as we learnt to call her,or Boudica as she was known to the Celts.

She became known as 'Boadicea' to millions of British school-kids because two

people got it wrong.First of all,the Roman historian Tacitus recorded her name

with two 'c's as Boudicca.Then,in the Middle Ages,a copyist compounded

Tacitus' original error by misreading the 'u' as 'a' and the second 'c' as an 'e'. So

Boudicca became Boadicea.

In any case,that wasn't her name.As with so many 'barbarian' leaders,what

we take for a name was a sobriquet,like 'The Sun King 'for Louis XIV of

France. Buideac is a Celtic word,meaning 'victorious'. Which just goes to show

that you can't even believe what you read on monuments –especially if they're

right bang outside the Houses of Parliament.

Boudica,Queen of the Iceni –a formidable figure:

'In stature she was very tall,in appearance most terrifying,in the glance of her

eye most fierce,and her voice was harsh; a great mass of the tawniest hair fell to

her hips; around her neck was a large golden necklace; and she wore a tunic of

divers colours over which a thick mantle was fastened with a brooch.This was

her invariable attire.

excerpts from:[Terry_Jones,_Alan_Ereira]_Terry_Jones'_Barbarians

Edited by third_eye
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When I was a kid we called her Boadicea and now she is Boudicca.. ?????

it's Political correctness gone mad! I think it's the EU.

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Posted (edited)

I'd heard that it was King's Cross station, although I suppose that might be Dumbledore. :(

http://www.unexplain...howtopic=242455

Scroll down (post #5)

Edited by ealdwita

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With the find of Richard the lll and Alfred the Great finding Queen Boudicca would add to our knowledge about these people and clear up some mysteries about them.

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Posted (edited)

I hope they do find her!

It will be hard though, as it is not certain where exactly she is buried, and their not sure where she was defeated by the Romans. Every historian or archeologist seems to favor a different site.

The location of Boudica's defeat is unknown. Most historians favour a site in the West Midlands, somewhere along the Roman road now known as Watling Street. Kevin K. Carroll suggests a site close to High Cross in Leicestershire, on the junction of Watling Street and the Fosse Way, which would have allowed the Legio II Augusta, based at Exeter, to rendezvous with the rest of Suetonius's forces, had they not failed to do so.[27] Manduessedum (Mancetter), near the modern town of Atherstone in Warwickshire, has also been suggested,[28] as has 'The Rampart' near Messing in Essex, according to legend.[29] More recently, a discovery of Roman artefacts in Kings Norton close to Metchley Camp has suggested another possibility,[30] and a thorough examination of a stretch of Watling Street between St. Albans, Boudica's last known location, and the Fosse Way junction has suggested the Cuttle Mill area of Paulerspury in Northamptonshire, which has topography very closely matching that described by Tacitus of the scene of the battle.[31] In March 2010 evidence was published suggesting the site may be located at Church Stowe, Northamptonshire.

Not to mention there are only TWO sources that wrote about her, ALL many years later, and only by ROMAN sources.

Tacitus, the most important Roman historian of this period, took a particular interest in Britain as Gnaeus Julius Agricola, his father-in-law and the subject of his first book, served there three times. Agricola was a military tribune under Suetonius Paulinus, which almost certainly gave Tacitus an eyewitness source for Boudica's revolt. Cassius Dio's account is only known from an epitome, and his sources are uncertain. He is generally agreed to have based his account on that of Tacitus, but he simplifies the sequence of events and adds details, such as the calling in of loans, that Tacitus does not mention.
Edited by Kowalski

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I have always considered Boudica a fierce but hopeless military leader. She out numbered the Romans by at least 10 to 1 (some claim 23 to 1) in her final battle, but charged the heavily armored legions head on with very lightly armed/armored troops, leading to a total route. Anyone could see that would be a recipe for disaster. Maybe she couldn't control her very large army to prevent a head on assualt?

If she was trying to end the battle early then a full charge with her chariots would have been more likely to break the defensive lines, but why not surround and starve the enemy?

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who cares

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who cares

Plenty of people do, obviously.

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That is a strange looking McDonald's. If they do find something under there is McD's going to let anyone excavate under their building? I don't think, so. Let m'Lady rest in peace.

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That is a strange looking McDonald's. If they do find something under there is McD's going to let anyone excavate under their building? I don't think, so. Let m'Lady rest in peace.

it is, isn't it? Rather Art Deco. I wonder what it was originally? Perhaps a 1930s roadside restaurant or something.

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Tannoy Announcer: The next Queen at platform eight, or nine or maybe even ten, will be arriving approximately 2,000 years late.

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I suppose it is novel to find the resting places of so many historic figures, but is it really necessary to dig up their earthly remains to "study" the heck out of them, especially if they are not respectfully placed back into the ground for a peaceful eternal rest? It seems like an awful invasion of privacy for the sake of "science." If Boudicca is buried under McDonald's, she should be allowed to stay there.

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One day, all our graves will be under a McDonalds.

Thus is the circle of life completed.

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One must wonder why McD's are drawn to graves...why the dead bodies?

OH MY GOD THE MCRIBS! NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

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This thread smells a bit off since page 2 :whistle:

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