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Ashotep

Pipeline Ruptures In Arkansas

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Possibly up to 10,000 barrels of oil have spilled after a pipeline busted that carries crude to the Texas Gulf Coast. Dozens of homes were evacuated. What a mess.

We really need another pipeline running through the country.

Homes evacuated after ExxonMobil oil pipeline spill in Arkansas

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There is a pipeline not too far from where I live and I hope it never breaks. These oil spills are killing the environment one spill at a time.

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There is a pipeline not too far from where I live and I hope it never breaks. These oil spills are killing the environment one spill at a time.

Amen.

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A few days ago a train carrying oil from Canada derailed in Minnesota, spilling it's entire load of 26,000 gallons (98,000 liters).

Truck, train, pipes, it doesn't matter, accidents are going to happen. As demand increases we can expect to see more spills.

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You add all the individual oil spill's up, that's a lot of oil, a lot of contamination.

Wish we could come up with something better than oil.

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Possibly up to 10,000 barrels of oil have spilled after a pipeline busted that carries crude to the Texas Gulf Coast. Dozens of homes were evacuated. What a mess.

We really need another pipeline running through the country.

Homes evacuated after ExxonMobil oil pipeline spill in Arkansas

You do realize that millions of barrels of oil move through pipelines each and every day around the US, right?

It's also the safest - BY FAR - method of transporting not only oil, but hundreds of other materials.

What is your solution?

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There is a video with this article of the oil spill. Looks so nasty and they say it really stinks. Hope Obama doesn't let them run another pipeline across the country to carry this tar sands oil from Canada to the Gulf to be shipped to foreign countries.

It’s not just any oil, either: it’s tar sands, a heavy, gritty and more toxic type of oil that is particularly difficult to transport and even more difficult to clean out of water sources.

Shocking: Tar sands oil flows through Arkansas neighborhood’s streets

My solution would be to look for other forms of energy.

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There is a video with this article of the oil spill. Looks so nasty and they say it really stinks. Hope Obama doesn't let them run another pipeline across the country to carry this tar sands oil from Canada to the Gulf to be shipped to foreign countries.

My solution would be to look for other forms of energy.

It's sad that we already have environment friendly forms of energy but it's just not being invested in.

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Just like Deepwater Horizon, the quantity of oil escaping from this leak is growing daily, exponentially.

I wonder why Obama is not taking a trip down there to console the locals now that their homes and environment are ruined? Maybe it would be too embarassing, considering his support of the Keystone project?

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From this article on CNN

Exxon Mobil met with displaced residents over the weekend to explain how they can make claims for losses. "If you have been harmed by this spill then we're going to look at how to make that right," Exxon Mobil Pipeline Co. President Gary Pruessing told them

That's probably all they will do... just look at how to make it right without actually making anything right.

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My solution would be to look for other forms of energy.

And we're doing that, but until that technology is fully online, what do we do in the interim?

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Spills are part and parcel of the oil industry. As long as we remain addicted to oil, we can expect more of them. It is hypocritical to blame the industry for making a mess while we continue to buy their products. They are a large and powerful group only because we have made them large and powerful. If we really want to do something about oil (and tar) spills, we are going to have to start using other forms of energy.

How? For openers, triple the commitment to wind energy. Why settle for 20% of US energy being produced by wind in 2030 when we can have 30%? Or more?

Nuclear energy still has the risk of large-scale contamination and the problem of storage of nuclear waste, but maybe... Fast breeders can use reprocessed waste. We have enough of that on hand to generate our power needs for the next thousand years without mining any more. That's $50 billion worth. Why not use it? Fast breeders produce waste with a half-life of about 300 years, rather than 5000 years. That's a significant reduction of the storage problem and a lot of carbon-free energy, too.

Might that fuel be pelletized and coated with a ceramic covering that would keep pellets apart, thus eliminating the risk of a melt-down? New reactor designs could be made safer. At any rate, with the continuing threat to the climate, what do we have to lose?

Doug

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Posted (edited)

Doug there has never been a fast breeder reactor go into full commercial production due to the intrinsic technical difficulties and significant increase in overall cost.

A well balanced analysis;

http://e360.yale.edu/feature/are_fast-breeder_reactors_a_nuclear_power_panacea/2557/

Br Cornelius

Edited by Br Cornelius

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Doug there has never been a fast breeder reactor go into full production due to the intrinsic technical difficulties and significant increase in overall cost.

Br Cornelius

Detroit Edison's Fermi reactor did.

Of course, it had a little meltdown. But I think we ought to at least take another look at fast breeders.

Doug

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Detroit Edison's Fermi reactor did.

Of course, it had a little meltdown. But I think we ought to at least take another look at fast breeders.

Doug

I corrected myself in saying commercial production.

I was briefly a fan of Thorium reactors until I looked into it more closely.

We have created a problem in the form of nuclear waste which might make fast breeders the best solution to that problem - but we may have to face the very real prospect of more small scale accidents in the reprocessing side and a significantly increased cost for our electricity. If we go down this route the focus should be on the waste problem rather than generating a whole new raft of dangerous nuclear power plants to solve our energy problems.

Br Cornelius

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I corrected myself in saying commercial production.

Detroit Fermi was in commercial production when it had the meltdown. It demonstrated that fast breeders are commercially viable, but fell a little short in the safety area.

It was a safety device that malfunctioned and caused the meltdown. Oh, the irony!

Doug

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Here's a great video of the spill taken from a helicopter. They made the area a no fly zone right after this. Wonder why.

Web Extra: Aerial Footage of Mayflower Oil Spill

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Good video Hilander! It looks like only 4 houses were directly impacted by the oil. That is, having oil in their yards. Otherwise it's mostly in the street.

Common Dreams has a story this morning about how Exxon's people are enforcing a sort of martial law atmosphere there, threatening to arrest a reporter asking too many questions.

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It looks like only 4 houses were directly impacted by the oil. That is, having oil in their yards. Otherwise it's mostly in the street.

So only 4 houses? really?

Are they going to replace the concrete in the street too? This crap seeps into the porous nature of concrete, then down into the groundwater and then presto, everyone downstream is drinking poison. Not to mention the pollution and poisoning of wildlife and natural areas that can't really be "cleaned up", ever. This area is permanently destroyed. The whole neighborhood houses now have zero value. This is the new "Love Canal" but now in Arkansas.

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Did anyone notice the oil floating on the water.

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So only 4 houses? really?

Are they going to replace the concrete in the street too? This crap seeps into the porous nature of concrete, then down into the groundwater and then presto, everyone downstream is drinking poison. Not to mention the pollution and poisoning of wildlife and natural areas that can't really be "cleaned up", ever. This area is permanently destroyed. The whole neighborhood houses now have zero value. This is the new "Love Canal" but now in Arkansas.

I completely agree with you Ninja. My only point was that as far as direct damage, from the overhead video it appears that only 4 houses were directly impacted. All things considered, the entire neighborhood took a huge hit and the value of the homes was pretty well lost.

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Whats more important is that without digging out all the effected soil, the neighbourhood will have to be abandoned for at least a few decades whilst the carcinogenic toxins dissipate. If you see anything less been advocated for these people then effectively Exxon have consigned them to a game of Russian roulette with cancer as the inevitable consequence somewhere down the line.

Br Cornelius

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I completely agree with you Ninja. My only point was that as far as direct damage, from the overhead video it appears that only 4 houses were directly impacted. All things considered, the entire neighborhood took a huge hit and the value of the homes was pretty well lost.

yeah. It just makes me mad. We have zillions of miles of piplines. And we actually need them. I *think* it's safer than trucks. But we've got to do better than this.

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There was another pipeline break as well.

http://rt.com/usa/shell-pipeline-oil-texas-409/

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