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Abramelin

The ancient Strait of Dover

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Posted (edited)

Is there anyone out there who can change the next 2D image of the Strait of Dover in 6500 BCE into a 3D image?

Strait_of_Dover_8500BP.jpg

MAP 4: 8,500 years ago - sea level rises, flooding through the gaps in the hills, joining the North Sea and the Atlantic.

http://www.theotherside.co.uk/tm-heritage/background/channelform.htm

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Excellent post.

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Excellent post.

Really?

Well, then I hope it gets even better, and someone posts that 3D image.

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I think some kind of heightmap would make it easier.

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I think some kind of heightmap would make it easier.

I know, but I haven't found one yet.

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Posted (edited)

Anyone out there able AND willing to create that image with Photoshop and/or CAD?

Yes, I don't know what I am asking because I have never used either one of them.

And the only 'reward' will be my appreciation... sigh.

Strait_of_Dover_8500BP_2_zps08b57cd9.jpg

.

Edited by Abramelin
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Posted (edited)

Sorry it took so long for me to reply Abe...

I converted your drawing to a sort of gray scale image (darker being lower, lighter being higher) and brought it into a program I have called Bryce...

here is the result - hope it works for you... The view is 60 degrees downward angle from the south - I can change that if you like, as the object is fully 3D on my system...

I removed the arrows... and you will note that the yellow blocks (that mark the current coast line I assume) are the same terrain texture as the ground... I could change that for you if you like but it will take a bit of time to do so...

StraightsofDover_zpsc751d6c9.png

Edited by Taun
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That's great Taun, and thanks for trying !

Since you asked me whether I wanted you to change it if I liked.... yes, I do :

What I would really like is the view of someone sailing up to those white cliffs from the south (the Channel), and from a distance he could see them all (only those on the south of course) plus the coast line west and east of those cliffs, and preferably in white.

I don't even know if it was physically possible to see all that in one view back then.

You said:

"and you will note that the yellow blocks (that mark the current coast line I assume) are the same terrain texture as the ground... I could change that for you if you like but it will take a bit of time to do so"

Yes, these yellow blocks do indeed mark the current coast line, so if you make the change it's ok if you deleted them some way or the other.

And please take your time: I really didn't expect anyone to jump on this one, so I am already glad you are trying.

Btw, I like the gloomy color of the seas; that is the impression I wanted.

Why? Because - as I said in the Doggerland thread - the ancient name of the North Sea (or the remaining Dogger Island, after the tsunami) was "Hell", the "Underworld", and maybe equal to the Nordic "Niflheim" (Place of Mists), or the Greek "Hades". And when you consider what had happened to Doggerland, then the name "Hell"seems very appropriate.

.

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This is what I posted in the "Favorite Historical Mysteries" thread in the "Alternative Histories" forum:

As many will know, one of my most favorite mysteries is "Doggerland" :

http://www.unexplain...0

It was the area that is now the North Sea, and it got catastrophically flooded around 6150 BCE, after it was already steadily sinking because of rising sea levels and post glacial isostatic adjustment.

Why is it a mystery to me?

Because it was something close to a post-glacial North European paradise, it was densely populated, and because no recognizable myths have survived of its final submergence (caused by a huge tsunami that may have lasted for 2 days on end).

And the Strait of Dover - formed right after the tsunami caused by the Storegga Slide - looked quite differently : many huge white cliffs standing close together and by that creating a dangerous situation (very strong sea currents) for those who wanted to sail through it (and they did have boats back then, 8150 BP).

If there ever had been real "Pillars of Hercules", then these would have been it, 8150 years ago.

And those brave enough to pass those huge white chalk pillars would enter a shallow sea with mud shoals and a few remaining islands.

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That's great Taun, and thanks for trying !

Since you asked me whether I wanted you to change it if I liked.... yes, I do :

What I would really like is the view of someone sailing up to those white cliffs from the south (the Channel), and from a distance he could see them all (only those on the south of course) plus the coast line west and east of those cliffs, and preferably in white.

I don't even know if it was physically possible to see all that in one view back then.

You said:

"and you will note that the yellow blocks (that mark the current coast line I assume) are the same terrain texture as the ground... I could change that for you if you like but it will take a bit of time to do so"

Yes, these yellow blocks do indeed mark the current coast line, so if you make the change it's ok if you deleted them some way or the other.

And please take your time: I really didn't expect anyone to jump on this one, so I am already glad you are trying.

Btw, I like the gloomy color of the seas; that is the impression I wanted.

Why? Because - as I said in the Doggerland thread - the ancient name of the North Sea (or the remaining Dogger Island, after the tsunami) was "Hell", the "Underworld", and maybe equal to the Nordic "Niflheim" (Place of Mists), or the Greek "Hades". And when you consider what had happened to Doggerland, then the name "Hell"seems very appropriate.

.

Here's another version - same angle but I made the modern coastline a golden line.. .Unfortunately it sticks up above the scene... I'll work on a sea level drawing tonight...

Dover_zpsf1beca9f.png

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Taun, I hope - when you are finished - you won't claim copy right.

You won't have to worry about me, but the ideas I posted in the Doggerland thread ended up - including the pics I created - in some magazine....

Just saying.

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Btw, this is one of my attempts:

Dover_strait_ancient.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Btw, this is one of my attempts:

Dover_strait_ancient.jpg

Very nice! And no don't worry about any copywrite from me... I just really enjoy messing around with Bryce... One problem with the way I did this in Bryce is that it makes the coastlines all sharp cliffs... I can work around it but it'll take time...

Edited by Taun
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I just mirrored part of a pic. It's not that great of an attempt, lol.

I used IrfanView.

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Ah... Done that many times... :tu:

Bryce is a fully 3-D modeling program originally used for modeling terrain for engineers... Very, very simple to use, and very cheap also ($14 for the latest and greatest version).... Here is a drawing of a training station design at work that I laid out using Bryce... I created all the models using simple geometiric shapes (cubes, cylinders, etc).... As you can see it's very versitle

RDIsometric_zpse870885d.png

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You only make me more eager to see more of your work.

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