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Ohelemapit

Author sees thylacine twice

43 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

MasterFlint mentioned how the UK was so oppressed and the US is becoming the same.

The civil war was about American patriots fighting the British oppression and the Banking system.

The US now has the exact same banking system that the patriots fought against and the goverment is becoming more oppressive.

I think you mean the Revolutionary War not the Civil War.

Edited by Razer
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MasterFlint mentioned how the UK was so oppressed and the US is becoming the same.

The civil war was about American patriots fighting the British oppression and the Banking system.

The US now has the exact same banking system that the patriots fought against and the goverment is becoming more oppressive.

What he said! lol.

And technically only the fact that the u.s. won made it a revolutionary war, the American "civil war" wasn't a civil war either, it was two independent and sovereign countries going to war with each other, both had an established govt., laws, and monetary system. The so called "civil war" truly was the war of Northern Aggression...

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I think it is very unlikely that the thylacine is still around. Too many years have passed.

But it is possible.

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I think you mean the Revolutionary War not the Civil War.

My bad, yes you are correct.

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What I find interesting is what Bailey said about the Thalacine sense of smell. That might be one of the reasons it's hard to get a picture of Sasquatch and Oreng Penk and other mystery primates they know our smell and aviod the camers we set up to photograph them.

What if we try a hunters trick? we could smear deer-pee on the game cameras, so they smell like an animal rather than people...

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Make whatever claim you want, just have proof (tangible)to back it up.

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Like the Javan Rhino?

Hmm, I don't know much about the Javan Rhino actually. I might look it up when I have time.

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Hmm, I don't know much about the Javan Rhino actually. I might look it up when I have time.

It was a story on UM, they have found a couple after being thought to be completely extinct.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/viewnews.php?id=240515 - That's talking about vietnams population being completely extinct but I do remember something about the indonesian population being "refound".

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dad has a hippy theory that there a remote vally in tiland wich still has versions of all the extinct ausi animals

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I wonder what would happen if they tried to breed with dingos, both are technically dogs (never understood the tiger reference except for maybe an ancient asain tribute considering the geographical location of the country) but one is a marsupial

That would be a biological impossibility, a placental mammal will not "breed" with a marsupial. And very likely the dingo and thylacine would be about as compatible as a cobra and a mongoose, being direct competitors.

This also shows the problem with common names. A thylacine is not a "dog". As an example, there is a big difference between a chestnut horse and a horse chestnut. This is why Linnaeus gave us the scientific binomial naming system for living things, because you might have a plant or animal with a huge natural range across multiple countries/languages and in each having a different common name; however with his system it has only one Latin (or in some cases Greek) name and so can be identified as a particular species.

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I hope it is true, like I hope the hearings of the Ivory Billed woodpecker in Georgia, USA are true.

Believe that was Arkansas, but in any case one can hope it still lives. It is difficult to tell from the video footage. The Ivory Bill looks similar to the Pileated (which is quite common) so could be mistaken identity. The IB is also thought to possibly be alive in Cuba as well.

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interesting

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interesting

Very very interesting

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Posted (edited)

Or maybe the reason why we can't find the Sasquatch and Oreng Penk is because they aren't real :rolleyes:

I tend to believe the Orang Pendek is very similar to the gibbon sub-species known as Saimangs.

Saimang = Tailless, arboreal, black-furred, long, dense, shaggy hair, 1 m in height, and weighing up to 14 kg, long, gangling arms, face is hairless apart from a thin mustache. Native to the forests of Malaysia, Thailand, and Sumatra.

Orang Pendek = Ground-dwelling, bipedal primate that is covered in short fur and stands between 80 and 150 cm tall. Mountainous forests on the island of Sumatra. Some reports = blackish-brown, short-legged with long, powerful arms, seen in trees

4463078943_4de4a19bc1.jpg

It was a story on UM, they have found a couple after being thought to be completely extinct.

http://www.unexplain...s.php?id=240515 - That's talking about vietnams population being completely extinct but I do remember something about the indonesian population being "refound".

Maybe you mean the Sumatran Rhinos found in Borneo?

[media=]

[/media] Edited by DieChecker
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Cheers DieChecker

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dad has a hippy theory that there a remote vally in tiland wich still has versions of all the extinct ausi animals

versions? did not know animals were machines or robots. Anyway I i highly doubt that, Australia as an island was separate from the rest of the world that allowed Marsupials to grow, Thailand does not have space for giants to move around, while Australia does

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That would be a biological impossibility, a placental mammal will not "breed" with a marsupial. And very likely the dingo and thylacine would be about as compatible as a cobra and a mongoose, being direct competitors.

This also shows the problem with common names. A thylacine is not a "dog". As an example, there is a big difference between a chestnut horse and a horse chestnut. This is why Linnaeus gave us the scientific binomial naming system for living things, because you might have a plant or animal with a huge natural range across multiple countries/languages and in each having a different common name; however with his system it has only one Latin (or in some cases Greek) name and so can be identified as a particular species.

:tsu: :tsu:

Dog = Class: Mammalia, Order: Carnivora, Family: Canidae, Genus: Canis, Species: C. lupus, Subspecies: C. l. familiaris

Thylacine = Class: Mammalia, Infraclass: Marsupialia, Order: Dasyuromorphia, Family: Thylacinidae, Genus: Thylacinus, Species: T. cynocephalus

The only thing these two animals have in common is they are Mammals

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I think monsterquest got everything except a photo and an actual specimen. DNA the works... I don't remember the episode that well

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