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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter’s water linked to comet impact

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Herschel links Jupiter’s water to comet impact

ESA’s Herschel space observatory has solved a long-standing mystery as to the origin of water in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, finding conclusive evidence that it was delivered by the dramatic impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in July 1994.

During the spectacular week-long collision, a string of 21 comet fragments pounded into the southern hemisphere of Jupiter, leaving dark scars in the planet’s atmosphere that persisted for several weeks.

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Posted (edited)

Very interesting. It reminded me of an expert explaining why the sea is salty on an episode of BBC 'Coast'. The salt AND WATER ITSELF was created by the first reaction of magma containing weak hydrochloric acid reacting with the surface alkaline rocks. The chemical reaction produces sodium chloride and water. Could Jupiter's comet have created a chemical reaction rather than delivering the water as ice perhaps??

Edited by RingFenceTheCity

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Could Jupiter's comet have created a chemical reaction rather than delivering the water as ice perhaps??

Given that comets are primarily made of water ice it wouldn't seem very likely.

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Given that comets are primarily made of water ice it wouldn't seem very likely.

Good to keep an open mind though. You never know..

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Good to keep an open mind though. You never know..

Not so open that it falls out though.

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Given that comets are primarily made of water ice it wouldn't seem very likely.

It depends on the size of the comet compared to the amount of water detected. If there is a major discrepency, then my idea should be thought of with a little more respect.

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Posted (edited)

It depends on the size of the comet compared to the amount of water detected. If there is a major discrepency, then my idea should be thought of with a little more respect.

I treat all your ideas with the respect they deserve.

As your ideas generally have zero evidence to support them then they respect they deserve is precisely none at all.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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I treat all your ideas with the respect they deserve.

As your ideas generally have zero evidence to support them then they respect they deserve is precisely none at all.

That's a false statement and probably reflects the amount of posts you get in your section. Rather low response rate overall don't you think?

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That's a false statement and probably reflects the amount of posts you get in your section. Rather low response rate overall don't you think?

Nope, it's fairly accurate. Your post in this section is a good example. An object made of water ice crashes into Jupiter. Water ice is detected in the atmosphere of Jupiter. You suggest a totally unnecessary step involving a chemical reaction with NO evidence to back up your hypothesis.

A scientific hypothesis should only be respected when there is empirical evidence to support it. You make post after post in this section with ideas which not only are not supported by the empirical evidenced but are destroyed by it. You usually choose to ignore the evidence when it doesn't support you.

Your posts may get a lot of replies but they are usually reply after reply explaining why you are wrong and you arguing that you aren't.

Now can we get back on topic please?

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