Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4
krillen

Collecting Rainwater Is Now Illegal!

52 posts in this topic

Many of the freedoms we enjoy here in the U.S. are quickly eroding as the nation transforms from the land of the free into the land of the enslaved, but what I’m about to share with you takes the assault on our freedoms to a whole new level. You may not be aware of this, but many Western states, including Utah, Washington and Colorado, have long outlawed individuals from collecting rainwater on their own properties because, according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.

rainbarrel.jpg

More details: Collecting Rainwater Now Illegal in Many States (Video)

What a nightmare. Couldn't believe this. :passifier::st

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the laws that get passed are ridiculous and they keep coming.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is it to stop people doing it with out knowing the dangers, how much is a permit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A man in our town is serving jail because he collected water on his own property.. Here in Medford Oregon I guess if you collect water you're an enemy of the state.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure why and I think it's about $100 just to file. No idea if there are additional annual fees. Probably.

Nibs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is it to stop people doing it with out knowing the dangers,

what dangers?? ppl have been doing it for thousands of years, we have not noticed any dangers.

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's one of those laws designed to prevent a problem from starting. Lets say the entire population of the U.S. got involved in a new trend to collect large amount of rainwater on every single piece of property(including farms, companies that wanted to sell bottled rainwater and other large pieces of land), that could have a very big impact on the environment if that much water never reached the ground.

Do any of these state laws have a limit on how much a private citizen can gather(per gallon), or are they complete bans?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

It's one of those laws designed to prevent a problem from starting. Lets say the entire population of the U.S. got involved in a new trend to collect large amount of rainwater on every single piece of property(including farms, companies that wanted to sell bottled rainwater and other large pieces of land), that could have a very big impact on the environment if that much water never reached the ground.

Do any of these state laws have a limit on how much a private citizen can gather(per gallon), or are they complete bans?

Here it is a complete ban unless you have the permit. I guess I understand the reasoning. We are ALWAYS under water restrictions in the summer.

Nibs

I think the permits are only issued to those on well water. Not positive. I don't know a ton about the laws, we are on city water.

Nibs (again)

Edited by HerNibs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I hope those who are collecting it...run it through decent filtering systems. Last I had read, rain water contains moderate levels of bacteria and man made polutants.

Edited by WoIverine
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dumbest law ever!

What do they think people are doing with the water?

And to say it never reaches the ground and will cause problems if everyone did it is nuts too.

I collect rain water and use it to water my garden and flowers around the house, its all reaching the ground just in a directed manner that serves nature better.

What kind of crazy world are we living in?

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this to help farmers because I heard there was a water shortage

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is so stupid!

Why do you need a permit to collect rainwater on your own property?! Just asinine...

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is so stupid!

Why do you need a permit to collect rainwater on your own property?! Just asinine...

Just one more way to get into your pockets.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A man in our town is serving jail because he collected water on his own property.. Here in Medford Oregon I guess if you collect water you're an enemy of the state.

Why was he collecting rain water? how much? how long?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why was he collecting rain water? how much? how long?

It's his property. Does he really need a reason?

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a joke ........ right?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may not be aware of this, but many Western states, including Utah, Washington and Colorado, have long outlawed individuals from collecting rainwater on their own properties because, according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.

It is the Bolded underlined bit, that I cannot see how they work out who own's it, how can ANYONE own something that is natural

Seem's to me (and I may be far off) that it is not the actual rainwater they are trying to control, but the actual water supply itself, if You are not allowed to collect rain water, then You have to go to some company to buy water

Four dollars for a gallon of gas is ridiculous enough, but $4 for a gallon of water could someday became a reality, that is if oil tycoons like T. Boone Pickens and water bottling companies have their way. Privatization of water in which companies control the public's water sources and free water is a thing of the past appears to be what Pickens and corporations such as Monsanto, Royal Dutch Shell, and Nestle are banking on to increase their vast fortunes.

Quote from this site

http://Four dollars for a gallon of gas is ridiculous enough, but $4 for a gallon of water could someday became a reality, that is if oil tycoons like T. Boone Pickens and water bottling companies have their way. Privatization of water in which companies control the public's water sources and free water is a thing of the past appears to be what Pickens and corporations such as Monsanto, Royal Dutch Shell, and Nestle are banking on to increase their vast fortunes.

Just one of many sites I have seen this or similiar stated on it

.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where do they think the water we drink everyday comes from??? Rain!!! Even lake water is from rain so if the rain is so polluted, so are we. Actually more like diluted... granted, rain off your roof might not be the best idea but it's safe to water your garden with....

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.

"You didn't rain that!"

327670650_640.jpg

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's one of those laws designed to prevent a problem from starting. Lets say the entire population of the U.S. got involved in a new trend to collect large amount of rainwater on every single piece of property(including farms, companies that wanted to sell bottled rainwater and other large pieces of land), that could have a very big impact on the environment if that much water never reached the ground.

Do any of these state laws have a limit on how much a private citizen can gather(per gallon), or are they complete bans?

Hey Buddy,are you having a laugh ?...Any saved water will reach the ground through plants,humans,or animals eventually,unless you're gonna save it and turn it all into steam.
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, rainwater, in certain climate districts, provide a substantial, sometimes the ONLY, contribution to the sub-surface water needed for eventual use even many miles away.

OK, I guess that makes SOME sense.

I don't know, I'm a little confused. I hope that certified geologists or whatever are an integral part in the debate of the restrictions for a particular district.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I don't see this becoming a wide spread issue. Around Santa Fe, NM all new housing built is required to have a catch basin. And Texas provides a sales tax exemption for those buying a system to capture rainwater. Oklahoma also has a program for water saving techniques and Ohio also allows people to capture rainwater for potable use.

So your "many" states amounts to three so far.

Edited by Kasey2601
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you ever get the feeling this is just another way to control what you do and has no other useful purpose. I can't believe that many people collect so much rainwater it needs to be regulated.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what dangers?? ppl have been doing it for thousands of years, we have not noticed any dangers.

i assume uncovered rain water collection can make you ill and urban living has made the populace ignorant of that which is common sense to people who dont get theirs readily out of the tap. its best to drink running water from a spring or secondly a river and boiling water before using kills germs. common sense to those who were taught, im sure a permit insures they have been taught and that they wont ignorantly supply masses of water to the unknowing.

you can also use limestone to purify water

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.