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StarMountainKid

Google's Policy Violation Checker

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Google’s proposed "Policy Violation Checker" would allow software to peek over peoples' shoulders while they type to alert individuals -- and potentially their employers -- when their written text contained "problematic phrases" that “present policy violations, have legal implications, or are otherwise troublesome to a company, business, or individual," according to the patent filing.

In the patent application, Google details a process that would allow its algorithms to automatically detect troublesome text by comparing the writing to a database of phrases previously identified as “problematic." The tool could not only inform a person that they've written something that violates protocol, it could also tell an individual why she’s run afoul of the rules, suggest alternate wording that would be less risky and, crucially, alert third parties to the violation.

“If a user creates a text document, presentation, or other document with a problematic phrase, the policy violation checker may notify a member of the legal department of the existence of the document,” Google explains in its patent filing.

The technology could be applied beyond email to include any electronic document, “such as a text document, spreadsheet, presentation, or electronic mail message,” according to the patent brief. And the software could be customized to run on “any type of processing device including, but not limited to, a computer, workstation, distributed computing system, embedded system, stand-alone electronic device, networked device, mobile device, set-top box, television, or other type of processor or computer system.”
It also seems reasonable to venture that the database could initially be populated by an authoritarian regime's Internet censors. And with the ability to integrate the software on “any type of processing device,” from a smartphone to a television, oppressive governments could be empowered to see anything their citizens write -- in Word documents, in emails, in drafts of blog posts, in digital journals -- and to view it before someone hits “send.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/06/google-policy-violation-checker_n_3224363.html

What do you think of this?

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I think it's another example of people being conditioned to accept having their private communications tapped or tracked, etc.

And when it comes to something like this, it's something that probably gets written within a wall of text amongst "rules" people agree to without having any idea this is actually being done.

But that aside, I generally assume plenty of agencies (law enforcement or otherwise) have access to all of these types of things already (peoples emails, web searches, phone conversations, text messages, etc).

Big Brother keeps an eye on everything.

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So, if I understand correctly, I couldn´t even wrte my thoughts in word with no intention of sending and am still monitered? Thought police must not be too far off!

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So, if I understand correctly, I couldn´t even wrte my thoughts in word with no intention of sending and am still monitered? Thought police must not be too far off!

That's pretty much what the last quoted paragraph is suggesting. Even typing something in a text box like this before you post it, if that isn't thought policing then what is????. Heck we'll all be going back to our pigeon post and paper and pen journals and proclaiming ourselves as poets and artists if this comes through.

I mean if they seriously intend to self moderate anything which can be typed into, does that mean they are going to have courts dedicated to handling all the internet drama and bs you get 1 billion times an hour 24/7 ?

Can you see it now? someone in court arguing over **** like, you typed a profanity into your notepad ZOMG, our records show you typed it at exactly 3:33am then it was edited at 3:34am and then finally deleted at 3:45am - you are now being sentenced to an anger management course for abusing your keyboard and the notepad.

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Technology like this gives me the chills (and I work in the IT industry). That being said, where technology closes a door, it opens a window. The same people that write software like this are the same people that like to exploit the loopholes and out of the goodness of their hearts, eventually release the "fix" to the rest of us :gun:

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Heck we'll all be going back to our pigeon post and paper and pen journals if this comes through.

.

would this be such a bad thing?

maybe spelling, diction, and grammar would all improve if we did.....?

:-)

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some will welcome this as cheating on spouses would have no choice but to seek other avenues to perpetuate their hanky panky activities ...

one man's Big Brother is another's Big Brudder

:lol:

its been around for a long time now ... 'keyloggers' .... some use for malicious purposes ... others use for secure peace of mind

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Did anyone bother reading the actual patent application or did everyone just literally jump to conclusions?

Being that I work for the aforementioned company and personally knowing one of the app developers involved, I personally understand the purpose of the app itself.

Here is an excerpt from the description part of the application.

BRIEF SUMMARY

[0003] It is in the best interest of companies to prevent violations of company policy or laws before they occur. As businesses glow, the number of documents in a business rises exponentially, and the potential that a particular document may implicate a violation of law or company policy grows. Business employees often knowingly or unknowingly discuss actions that could potentially lead to violations of company policy, such as a confidentiality policy, or run afoul of the law.

It was built as an app for business use. To make sure all out going communications from within the company's private network including VPN, are not in violation of any company policy.

Can it be used maliciously to spy on the population? Sure. Is that the intention it was built for? Absolutely not.

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Can it be used maliciously to spy on the population? Sure. Is that the intention it was built for? Absolutely not.

The first half of the statement above is the issue. The technology used to accomplish its stated intended purpose will be used inappropriately by both companies and instances outside of company use.

It's yet another step in people being conditioned to accept a belief that nothing they do has a right to be kept private. It seems the only people and institutions who think they have a right to keep things private anymore are those involved in politics and the government itself.

Yet the government, and those that comprise it, are the very ones implementing these laws and policies that allow them to spy on anyone they feel like - just as long as they get to keep everything they want to keep private private (for the good of the people of course...)

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