Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
Waspie_Dwarf

First X-Class Solar Flares of 2013

7 posts in this topic

First X-Class Solar Flares of 2013

Original Story:

On May 12, 2013, the sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 10 p.m. EDT. This flare is classified as an X1.7, making it the first X-class flare of 2013. The flare was also associated with another solar phenomenon, called a coronal mass ejection (CME) that can send solar material out into space. This CME was not Earth-directed.

arrow3.gifRead more...

First Update: 1:30 p.m. EDT

On May 13, 2013, the sun emitted an X2.8-class flare, peaking at 12:05 p.m. EDT. This is the the strongest X-class flare of 2013 so far, surpassing in strength the X1.7-class flare that occurred 14 hours earlier. It is the 16th X-class flare of the current solar cycle and the third-largest flare of that cycle. The second-strongest was an X5.4 event on March 7, 2012. The strongest was an X6.9 on Aug. 9, 2011.

Second Update: 3:30 p.m. EDT

The X2.8-class flare was also associated with a coronal mass ejection, or CME, another solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of solar particles into space, which can potentially affect electronic systems in satellites and on the ground. The CME was not Earth-directed, but could pass NASA's STEREO-B, Messenger and Spitzer spacecraft. Their mission operators have been notified. Experimental NASA research models show that the CME left the sun at 1,200 miles per second beginning at 12:18 p.m. EDT. If warranted, operators can put spacecraft into safe mode to protect the instruments from solar material.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Third Update: May 14, 9 a.m. EDT

The sun emitted a third significant solar flare in under 24 hours, peaking at 9:11 p.m. EDT on May 13, 2013. This flare is classified as an X3.2 flare. This is the strongest X-class flare of 2013 so far, surpassing in strength the two X-class flares that occurred earlier in the 24-hour period.

The flare was also associated with a coronal mass ejection, or CME. The CME began at 9:30 p.m. EDT and was not Earth-directed.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Old Sol is deinitley waking up. Should be able to see the surface activity in that region soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First X-Class Flares of 2013

On May 12-13, 2013, the sun erupted with an X1.7-class and an X2.8-class flare, as well as two coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, off the upper left side of the sun. Solar material also danced and blew off the sun in what's called a prominence eruption on the lower right side of the sun. This movie compiles imagery of this activity from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and from NASA and the European Space Agency's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.

Credit: NASA/SDO/ESA/SOHO

Music: 'Long Range Cruise' by Lars Leonhard, courtesy of the artist and BineMusic. www.lars-leonhard.de

Source: NASA - Multimedia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NASA SDO & NASA SOHO - Three X-class Solar Flares seen by Two Spacecraft

A look at the three X-class solar flares through two different instruments on two different spacecrafts.

The "green" Sun is seen through the AIA instrument at 131 angstroms. This channel sees very hot temperatures, at approx. 18 million F, and is great to study solar flares.

The "red" view is from NASA/ESA's LASCO C2 instrument and shows us the outer region and how the ejected plasma (called a Coronal Mass Ejection or CME) is traveling away from the Sun.

As you can see these three flares occurred to the left of the Sun and the CME is not traveling towards Earth. No planets are in the way of this fast traveling CME. However, the CMEs appear to be on course to hit NASA's Epoxi and Spitzer spacecrafts on May 15-16.

Credit: NASA SDO / NASA/ESA SOHO

Source: NASA Little SDO - YouTube Channel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NASA SDO - X-Class Solar Flares; A closer Look (May 13-15, 2013)

A more intimate look at the recent X-class solar flares, including a look at the Active Region 1748, which has been producing these flares.

My favorite segment is the yellow 171 angstrom wavelength. It shows the magnetic field lines in this area of the Sun's atmosphere, the corona, and how they began to twist and kink, generating the hottest solar material -- a charged gas called plasma.

Enjoy this beautiful view of our Star.

Credit: NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory

Source: NASA Little SDO - YouTube Channel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.