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Kowalski

Consider All Communications Monitored

135 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

This is getting scary....

May 14, 2013, 8:48 a.m. EDT

How to stop the FBI from reading your email

Officials can read messages older than 6 months without a warrant

Emails are not private. A message may have one sender and one recipient but it can, with little effort, be read by a third party. In fact, despite the Fourth Amendment’s protections against unlawful searches, federal agencies do not necessarily need a warrant to read emails older than six months.

Concerns over such government snooping were raised by the American Civil Liberties Union, which last week noted a “troubling picture” of email surveillance practices by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Justice. The agencies may be taking advantage of a component of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which requires warrants only for emails that have been stored on a third-party server for less than 180 days.

Taken from: http://www.marketwat...4?siteid=yhoof2

Also see: http://www.infowars....eing-monitored/

Edited by Kowalski
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They can have our privacy, but they can't have our souls.

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don't for even a tiny moment think that your mobile sms texts or mms are 'private' too //

all those hackers caught hacking accounts are just scape goats,

the ones that releases those private intimate photos especially of the famous, into the wild wild web are usually those working in the telcos ...

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Posted (edited)

Older than 6 months? I suppose this must be for long term surveillance jobs. Does that mean that if I write an email containing a few choice keywords, like "Obama", "North Korea" and "chorizo", it'll be at least six months before the Feds can flag it up as suspicious? where's the fun in that?

Edited by Colonel Rhuairidh
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They can have our privacy, but they can't have our souls.

Don't be so sure - they might get those too eventually

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All you got wrong was the date, George.

orwell.jpg

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Posted (edited)

well there are pbly billions of e mails gonig around at any given hour, in the world, i don't see how fbi can manage to track, read, and figure what is relavant what is not. i doubt fbi, or entire us gvmnt has manpower to do it. they can collect billions of terrabites of data, ok, than what?

unless they are looking at someones in particular (and i'm pretty sure, if you are in buissnes where fbi needs to see your e mails, you'll find a way to avoid it). all the data wont do much good to them.

same for sms, mms....

not to mention those that want to comunicate without being traced use shared email account and write drafts, never sending a single e mail out. general pertreus used that with his mistress, and millions of cheaters in the world do it as well. no emails sent, no trails. and no gvmnt organization has resourses to read every e mail account iin the world.

from leagl pov it conserns me, a "what is next" question pops to mind, but from practical pov, good luck fbi.

Edited by aztek

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Anything you say on the internet or emails is there forever and it doesn't surprise me that they read them.

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well there are pbly billions of e mails gonig around at any given hour, in the world, i don't see how fbi can manage to track, read, and figure what is relavant what is not. i doubt fbi, or entire us gvmnt has manpower to do it. they can collect billions of terrabites of data, ok, than what?

unless they are looking at someones in particular (and i'm pretty sure, if you are in buissnes where fbi needs to see your e mails, you'll find a way to avoid it). all the data wont do much good to them.

same for sms, mms....

not to mention those that want to comunicate without being traced use shared email account and write drafts, never sending a single e mail out. general pertreus used that with his mistress, and millions of cheaters in the world do it as well. no emails sent, no trails. and no gvmnt organization has resourses to read every e mail account iin the world.

from leagl pov it conserns me, a "what is next" question pops to mind, but from practical pov, good luck fbi.

They look for key words and have computers to find this for them and flag it as suspicious.
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The point is ... if you ever get in a bind with anything the 'authorities' perceives as 'questionable' they have a trail of months of digital activity associated with you to pull out of the archives ....

You'll be stuck in a room with four walls constantly replying "it was a joke" to questions for hours upon hours ...

if you are fortunate enough to have that privilege to a benefit of a doubt ....

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I've been planning on moving to a secure offshore email account for a while now. Guess it's time to pull the trigger on that. It's sad that we have to go out of our way to have privacy online...

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Posted (edited)

They look for key words and have computers to find this for them and flag it as suspicious.

yea, i've seen that movie too, however, i really doubt that is how it is done in real world.

Edited by aztek

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Posted (edited)

yea, i've seen that movie too, however, i really doubt that is how it is done in real world.

You would need a helluva lot of processing AND network power to monitor just one countries total email exchange. Just thinking about my company alone and the constant stream of emails being sent just to me, let alone between all the employees, on just a daily basis. That's just one company, in one city. There must be millions, if not billions of emails sent daily across the nation.

Technologically, I personally don't see how this is feasible. To monitor a "person of interest", sure. That's easy. But everyone? I suppose if email server hosts were required by law to monitor their own traffic for certain keywords and flag those users, it would take all the strain off of a single surveillance network.

But that ridiculous, right?

Edited by Dark_Grey

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yea, i've seen that movie too, however, i really doubt that is how it is done in real world.

How else could they do it? Have crack teams of Spooks monitoring everything everyone ever says or writes? I saw a list of the keywords they use once; quite amusing, some of them are, and I try to make a point of using as many of them as I can. In fact, I expect there are at least three in this very post. See if you can guess what they are.

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Another thread sourcing infowars and which belongs in the conspiracy theory section.

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And those who constantly quote Orwell's 1984, that was a work of fiction....if you are basing your ideas on fictional works then there is no helping that, but the News, Politics, and Current Affairs section is not based on fiction or shouldn't be anyways.

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And those who constantly quote Orwell's 1984, that was a work of fiction....if you are basing your ideas on fictional works then there is no helping that, but the News, Politics, and Current Affairs section is not based on fiction or shouldn't be anyways.

There's nothing wrong with quoting a fictional source that draws close parallels to reality. As long as it's in context and not being quoted as fact, it shouldn't really matter what is quoted.

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And those who constantly quote Orwell's 1984, that was a work of fiction....if you are basing your ideas on fictional works then there is no helping that, but the News, Politics, and Current Affairs section is not based on fiction or shouldn't be anyways.

Right, we shouldnt be able to recogize this work of fiction with what is happening in reality. So what if its near identical, right? My goodness.

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Another thread sourcing infowars and which belongs in the conspiracy theory section.

Actually the FIRST article I posted is from MarketWatch from the Washington Post....

No "conspiracy" here, this is fact.

Concerns over such government snooping were raised by the American Civil Liberties Union, which last week noted a “troubling picture” of email surveillance practices by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Justice. The agencies may be taking advantage of a component of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which requires warrants only for emails that have been stored on a third-party server for less than 180 days.

Documents reviewed by the ACLU showed that the FBI may be reading emails and other electronic messages without a warrant, and that different U.S. attorney’s offices may be applying “conflicting standards,” the group says. “It is time for Congress to step in and standardize the requirements and require warrants across the board,” says Nathan Wessler, a staff attorney with the ACLU. The report follows a similar review of IRS documents.

Facing pressure from the ACLU and lawmakers, the IRS said it would require warrants before reading all emails in both criminal and civil investigations, but did not offer any clarity on its policy for social media sites. The FBI issued a separate statement saying it “obtains emails in accordance with the laws and Constitution of the United States.” The Department of Justice did not respond to requests for comment.

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Posted (edited)

There's nothing wrong with quoting a fictional source that draws close parallels to reality. As long as it's in context and not being quoted as fact, it shouldn't really matter what is quoted.

True but some are basing their worldview on it and doing anything possible to avoid a fictional dystopic future based on a fictional decades old book.

Look at what some have did after reading Catcher in the Rye or the Turner Diaries. They like some of these others are taking it too far and blurring fiction and reality.

The conspiracy theory websites, full of adds, are profiting off of you. Those on the outside can clearly see it is an entertainment product some are beliving in a bit too much.

DYSTOPIA (dystopic): An imagined universe (usually the future of our own world) in which a worst-case scenario is explored; the opposite of utopia. Dystopic stories have been especially influential on postmodernism, as writers and film-makers imagine the effects of various aspects of our current postmodern condition, for example, the world's take-over by machines (The Matrix); the social effects of the hyperreal (Neuromancer); a society completely run by media commercialism (The Running Man); the triumph of late capitalism (Blade Runner); bureaucratic control run amok (Brazil, 1984); and so on.

For a Lesson Plan that ties such stories to postmodern theory, see the Postmodernism: Lesson Plans: Matrix/Neuromancer pathway.

http://www.cla.purdu...s/dystopia.html

Edited by Leave Britney alone!

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~snip

Now you are just bellowing from being too full of it .......... time and place ... this is neither .... go wave your flag else where

20987_10151581421020708_741717845_n.jpg

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Although opening of our third eye should lead one closer to enlightenment and bliss in their own lives and not more paranoia...

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True but some are basing their worldview on it and doing anything possible to avoid a fictional dystopic future based on a fictional decades old book.

I'm pretty sure the idea of a dystopian future existed long before 1984 was written. The book just took the concept and made it closer to home. Also, I see nothing wrong with people wanting to avoid a future like that - would you want to live in the world of 1984? I'm not really sure where you are going with all the finger-pointing towards that book...

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Although opening of our third eye should lead one closer to enlightenment and bliss in their own lives and not more paranoia...

In this instance it is you that is exhibiting the signs of paranoia .... it comes in many shades ...

this here is not paranoia but what governments are instigating as 'standard procedure'

The fiction is not just in the books anymore ... it is now non fiction out side of the books ... and never disrespect Mr Orwell ... and that is not just a 'decades old book.'

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i don't see why everyone is so paranoid anyway. It seems a perfectly sensible thing for any law enforcement organisation to do, and surely everyone would want to give co-operate with the law enforcment authorities in any way they can to eliminate evildoers.

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