Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 6
Sakari

No there is not a lot of open area in the US

140 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Been meaning to do this for a while....

Some people try to say that there is so much area in the USA that we have not, or do not explore.

This is a night time shot, and keep in mind, not everyone has there lights on, especially in rural areas.

49263main1_usa_nighttt.jpg

That is night time....In the day you can expand out.....

So, yes, we are fricken everywhere.

Now, for those that still want to say that. Do a google satelite of Oregon and Washington. ( or wherever people claim is Bif country ).....

Look at all of the logging, clear cut, and all of the roads........Sorry, we have, and are everywhere. Make sure you zoom in.

https://maps.google.com/

Edited by Sakari
7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope we are pretty much full. Any place with not a lot of people there is a reason for that, like its a desert, too cold or a national forest.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I understand the point, but we are still talking about massive tracts of land here. If someone wanted to stay hidden, it's possible.

That Utah 'Mountain Man' did so for quite some time.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I understand the point, but we are still talking about massive tracts of land here. If someone wanted to stay hidden, it's possible.

That Utah 'Mountain Man' did so for quite some time.

One person, not a breeding population with claims in every State.

Anyway, just posted it for past discussions. The same one that keep going around, and around, and around......

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bigfoot has his house lights on too..... lol

7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at all of those Canadian moochers riding our coattails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bigfoot has his house lights on too..... lol

Dang cryptid steals cable too.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Dang cryptid steals cable too.

Of course he has to watch the discovery channel and re runs of Harry and the Hendersons.

Edited by Coffey
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course he has to watch the discovery channel and re runs of Harry and the Hendersons.

He and his buddies watch Finding Bigfoot.

"Remember that one, Fred!" roars of laughter.

"Hey, go steal some more beer out of some camper's cooler. But remember to be polite, and close the lid!"

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big Foot glows at night, you bloody idiot!

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He and his buddies watch Finding Bigfoot.

"Remember that one, Fred!" roars of laughter.

"Hey, go steal some more beer out of some camper's cooler. But remember to be polite, and close the lid!"

Haha, can just imagine that. Why don't we sell our idea to fox, would make a pretty entertaining show. lol

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One person, not a breeding population with claims in every State.

Some 60,000 :w00t: has been theorized in one article posted on UM!

Every single one an expert in highway safety.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like this post. It's really hard for a breeding population of large animals to hide in America, due to the large population.

Nice post, Sakari.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like this post. It's really hard for a breeding population of large animals to hide in America, due to the large population.

Nice post, Sakari.

You man there aren't 200 of them living in the woods behind the local Wal-Mart?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You man there aren't 200 of them living in the woods behind the local Wal-Mart?

More like twenty, I think.

Urban sprawl might we account for the increase in sightings since the PGF came out. However, and this is a huge however, you have to take into consideration what a lot of group use as a criteria for calling something a "sighting". "I heard something in the bushes and it was large. Then I smelled something foul and caught a glimps of something large moving away for about a second." Is that a sighting? To some it is. Got a picture of a "Blobsquatch", that's a sighting. Thing is we often only have what we're allowed to see of the evidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All that development, and not one secret bigfoot burial site found? You got to hand it to those porcupines they are doing a hell of a job. :tu:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

You man there aren't 200 of them living in the woods behind the local Wal-Mart?

They're making clothes and getting paid in garlic cloves.

MADE IN THE USA

Edited by QuiteContrary
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Respectfully I have to disagree with your conclusion that there is “not a lot of open area in the U.S.” or that “we are everywhere.”

I can agree that man has probably stepped foot everywhere in the country over the last 200 or 300+ years, but that does not mean we are everywhere now, and certainly doesn’t mean we maintain any constant surveillance on everywhere.

About one third of the country is forested and has been for about the last 100 years and I doubt that all of it is being logged at the moment. If you wish to look at the Pacific Northwest, Washington is ~40% forest, Oregon is about the same, and Idaho is just over 30%. There are 18 states that are more than 50% forest.

While there is a large population in the country, we are not everywhere.

Look at the U.S. Census data from 2010.

http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/gazetteer2010.html

Under Places, there is a link to a text file that has the data for over 29,000 places (cities, town, and Census-designated places) and the area that those places occupy.

Removing Puerto Rico and Hawaii from the list, you have 29,111 individual places that have a total population of 227,149,751 and occupy about 201,545 sq mi.

The population of the U.S minus Puerto Rico and Hawaii in 2010 can be estimated at 303,659,448, and the area of the contiguous U.S. plus Alaska is 3,783,153 sq mi, suggesting that 74.8% of the contiguous U.S. and Alaskan populations occupy about 5.3% of the area. Doing algebra then suggests that 100% of the continental population occupies around 7.1% of the area. Most likely a majority of the population spends a majority of their time in this relatively small area.

The National Highway System, about 157,000 miles total and accounts for about 4% of the total road mileage in the country. If we wish to assume all interstates are four lanes both ways, then they occupy about 0.14% of the area. The other roads probably total about 4 million miles, and assuming these are one lane both ways they probably occupy another 0.88% of the area. All roads then make up about 1% of the area.

In total our cities, towns, highways and roads occupy about 8.1% of the area.

While we may have indeed been everywhere at one time or another, we were not everywhere at once, and we are not everywhere now, and we are certainly not maintaining any surveillance on the entire country constantly. We do a good job at surveillance within our cities as we like keeping an eye on each other, but outside in the wilderness?

The question that should be considered is how many people travel away from cities and off from the main road, i.e. into the wilderness. How many eyes and lenses are outside or away from our cities, towns and roads?

I like this post. It's really hard for a breeding population of large animals to hide in America, due to the large population.

Nice post, Sakari.

What is a breeding population?

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=242943&view=findpost&p=4730741

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is a breeding population?

http://www.unexplain...dpost&p=4730741

I understand your point. I personally find it very hard to believe that there are groups of large ape-like creatures roaming around in America with no solid evidence of their existence. But each to their own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's always the same arguments. One side will bring up evidence about the numbers you would need for a breeding population, the fact that no evidence of any apes being in The Americas before human and that there has been no evidence at all except for a few dodgy videos.

The other side will say, but we're not everywhere at once or maybe apes did come to The Americas, we just haven't found proof yet... Then the far out side will use bigfoot camouflage, burying the dead and even underground caves to try and win over the facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question that should be considered is how many people travel away from cities and off from the main road, i.e. into the wilderness. How many eyes and lenses are outside or away from our cities, towns and roads?

I went into detail on this numerous times. Not again....As I said this topic ( Bigfoot ) is a discussion that is a broken record, playing over and over and over.....

So....

Forest service, Electrical workers, Pipeline workers, Pipeline inspectors, Biologists, Lumber, Mining, Hunting, Hiking, Fishing, Mountain Biking, back packing, Camping, 4 wheel drive, Horse Back, State Troopers, Wildlife Service, Fish and Game.....

Just to name a few off the top of my head.

People that live off the grid....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All that development, and not one secret bigfoot burial site found? You got to hand it to those porcupines they are doing a hell of a job. :tu:

I've said it before and I'll say it again, it takes a lot of time to eat an entire Bigfoot.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The question that should be considered is how many people travel away from cities and off from the main road, i.e. into the wilderness. How many eyes and lenses are outside or away from our cities, towns and roads?

Insanity, I complete get what you're saying and I actually agree with it, but then too you have to consider that the population of the US has more than doubled and very nearly tripled in the time since the PGF. That's a lot of potential eyes looking. Me, I have had the great opportunity in life to hike and camp all over the US. Never once seen a track from a Bigfoot, never seen one, might have smelled one once and that covers some forty plus years. Now this hardly makes me a total expert but the law of averages says I should have seen something by now.......although I have seen some Porcupines that seemed a little suspicious a couple times.

I guess my main point is that urban sprawl is a serious thing, shoot you can google up Google Earth and see the sprawl happen over the last twenty years in a number of very specific locations. But, at least in my mind the thing in the population increase and still no solid evidence of Bigfoot. Maybe we should test Porcupine pooh for DNA?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Respectfully I have to disagree with your conclusion that there is "not a lot of open area in the U.S." or that "we are everywhere."

I can agree that man has probably stepped foot everywhere in the country over the last 200 or 300+ years, but that does not mean we are everywhere now, and certainly doesn't mean we maintain any constant surveillance on everywhere.

About one third of the country is forested and has been for about the last 100 years and I doubt that all of it is being logged at the moment. If you wish to look at the Pacific Northwest, Washington is ~40% forest, Oregon is about the same, and Idaho is just over 30%. There are 18 states that are more than 50% forest.

Forested areas do not equate to the lack of human habitation. In fact I would argue forested areas attract humans and human habitation especially in the arid west. Back east, and on the west coast millions of people live in forested areas.

While there is a large population in the country, we are not everywhere.

Look at the U.S. Census data from 2010.

http://www.census.go...etteer2010.html

Under Places, there is a link to a text file that has the data for over 29,000 places (cities, town, and Census-designated places) and the area that those places occupy.

Removing Puerto Rico and Hawaii from the list, you have 29,111 individual places that have a total population of 227,149,751 and occupy about 201,545 sq mi.

The population of the U.S minus Puerto Rico and Hawaii in 2010 can be estimated at 303,659,448, and the area of the contiguous U.S. plus Alaska is 3,783,153 sq mi, suggesting that 74.8% of the contiguous U.S. and Alaskan populations occupy about 5.3% of the area. Doing algebra then suggests that 100% of the continental population occupies around 7.1% of the area. Most likely a majority of the population spends a majority of their time in this relatively small area.

The National Highway System, about 157,000 miles total and accounts for about 4% of the total road mileage in the country. If we wish to assume all interstates are four lanes both ways, then they occupy about 0.14% of the area. The other roads probably total about 4 million miles, and assuming these are one lane both ways they probably occupy another 0.88% of the area. All roads then make up about 1% of the area.

In total our cities, towns, highways and roads occupy about 8.1% of the area.

While we may have indeed been everywhere at one time or another, we were not everywhere at once, and we are not everywhere now, and we are certainly not maintaining any surveillance on the entire country constantly. We do a good job at surveillance within our cities as we like keeping an eye on each other, but outside in the wilderness?

The question that should be considered is how many people travel away from cities and off from the main road, i.e. into the wilderness. How many eyes and lenses are outside or away from our cities, towns and roads?

The problem with statistics, and averages is, they can be manipulated to side with the users argument.

I think you failed to consider agricultural activity. Have you flown over the mid west lately? the vast majority of the land between the Rocky Mountains and Mississippi River has been plowed, planted, and irrigated. By necessity farm workers must maintain irrigation systems, plow, plant, and harvest their crops so these areas are visited regularly.

There is also gas and oil exploration/development. Vast tracts of land in southern Wyoming, and and eastern Utah are pockmarked with oil and gas wells that are all connected with a spiderweb of roads that are traveled frequently by maintainers. Google earth it if you don't believe me.

The pacific north west has been virtually clear cut, there is very little land that has not seen a chainsaw, or that is not crisscrossed with logging roads that are regularly used by the public, lumber companies, and the department of interior workers. Most of the land there is dotted with small farms and homesteads. I suggest you Google earth the area as Sakai suggested you might be surprised about the density of human habitation outside of the cities.

The last large tracts of uninhabited land in the US are in the interior western states, and Alaska, and even those areas are visited relatively frequently by people for a number of reasons. These wilderness areas attract millions of visitors a year just because they are remote and wild.

While your statistics seemingly indicate a very small percentage of the US is actually occupied by human habitation they do not tell the whole story of how we use the land and how often we visit the unoccupied areas. I think the satellite photo Sakari posted tells us the full story at a glance, as opposed to the skewed statistics you provided.

Edited by evancj
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been meaning to do this for a while....

Some people try to say that there is so much area in the USA that we have not, or do not explore.

Is this the guy (Sakari) who said just the other day in the Trail Camera thread, that his "backyard" went all the way over to I-5 with basically very little people in between?

How much of that land, (About 100 miles from the coast to I-5) then is inhabited to the degree where you'd feel that say, a caribou (released totally anoymusly), would quickly be spotted? Could it live in the woods indefinately and die alone of old age without ever being remarked or captured?

I think you're still overestimating mankinds observational skills and underestimating how much wild land there is.

Look at all of those Canadian moochers riding our coattails.

Yeah. Look at all that dark Canadian land...

Forest service, Electrical workers, Pipeline workers, Pipeline inspectors, Biologists, Lumber, Mining, Hunting, Hiking, Fishing, Mountain Biking, back packing, Camping, 4 wheel drive, Horse Back, State Troopers, Wildlife Service, Fish and Game.....

Just to name a few off the top of my head.

People that live off the grid....

People that have filed bigfoot sightings.... "Forest service, Electrical workers, Pipeline workers, Pipeline inspectors, Biologists, Lumber, Mining, Hunting, Hiking, Fishing, Mountain Biking, back packing, Camping, 4 wheel drive, Horse Back, State Troopers, Wildlife Service, Fish and Game....."

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 6

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.