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Silver Surfer

Ancients Coins in Australia

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It is indeed a mystery. Even the contents of the link is gone.

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It is indeed a mystery. Even the contents of the link is gone.

.

I managed to find it sheepy!

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.

I managed to find it sheepy!

Do share.

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Hmm link works fine for me ><

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to be honest though, I think the claim for discovery has to go to the aborigines.

after all, they'd been pottering about around australia for 60,000yrs before anyone else got there.....

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Do share.

.

ok sheepy, i'll copy & paste it for you, but I might get into trouble.....

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there you go sheepy!

let me know when you've read it so I can delete it!!

.

World

Ancient coins could rewrite

history

BARBARA BARKHAUSEN

Last updated 05:00 20/05/2013

Five copper coins and a nearly 70-

year-old map with an ‘‘X’’ might

lead to a discovery that could

rewrite Australia’s history.

Australian scientist Ian McIntosh,

currently Professor of Anthropology

at Indiana University in the US,

plans an expedition in July that has

stirred up the archaeological

community.

The scientist wants to revisit the

location where five coins were

found in the Northern Territory in

1944 that have proven to be 1000

years old, opening up the possibility

that seafarers from distant

countries might have landed in

Australia much earlier than what

was currently believed.

Back in 1944 during World War II,

after Japanese bombers had

attacked Darwin two years earlier,

the Wessel Islands — an uninhabited

group of islands off Australia’s

north coast — had become a

strategic position to help protect

the mainland.

Australian soldier Maurie Isenberg

was stationed on one of the islands

to man a radar station and spent his

spare time fishing on the idyllic

beaches.

While sitting in the sand with his

fishing-rod, he discovered a handful

of coins in the sand.

He didn’t have a clue where they

could come from but pocketed

them anyway and later placed them

in a tin.

In 1979 he rediscovered his

‘‘treasure’’ and decided to send the

coins to a museum to get them

identified.

The coins proved to be 1000 years

old.

Still not fully realising what treasure

he held in his hands, he marked an

old colleague’s map with an ‘‘X’’ to

remember where he had found

them.

The discovery was apparently

forgotten again until anthropologist

McIntosh got the ball rolling a few

months ago.

The coins raise many important

questions:

How did 1000-year-old coins end

up on a remote beach on an island

off the northern coast of Australia?

Did explorers from distant lands

arrive on Australian shores way

before the James Cook declared it

‘‘terra nullius’’ and claimed it for

the British throne in 1770?

We do know already that Captain

Cook wasn’t the first white seafarer

to step on Australia’s shores.

In 1606 a Dutch explorer named

Willem Janszoon reached the Cape

York peninsula in Queensland,

closely followed a few years late by

another Dutch seafarer Dirk Hartog.

And the Spaniard Luiz Vaez de

Torres discovered the strait between

Papua New Guinea and Australia,

which was later named Torres Strait

in his honour.

However, none of these explorers

recognised that they had discovered

the famed southern continent, the

‘‘terra australis incognita‘‘, which

was depicted as a counterweight to

the known land masses of the

northern hemisphere on many world

maps of the day.

McIntosh and his team of Australian

and American historians,

archaeologists, geomorphologists

and Aboriginal rangers say that the

five coins date back to the 900s to

1300s.

They are African coins from the

former Kilwa sultanate, now a World

Heritage ruin on an island off

Tanzania.

Kilwa once was a flourishing trade

port with links to India in the 13th

to 16th century.

The trade with gold, silver, pearls,

perfumes, Arabian stoneware,

Persian ceramics and Chinese

porcelain made the city one of the

most influential towns in East Africa

at the time.

The copper coins were the first

coins ever produced in sub-Saharan

Africa and according to McIntosh

have only twice been found outside

Africa; once in Oman and Isenberg’s

find in 1944.

The old coins might not be of

monetary value, but for

archaeologists they are priceless,

said McIntosh.

Archaeologists have long suspected

that there may have been early

maritime trading routes that linked

East Africa, Arabia, India and the

Spice Islands even 1000 years ago.

Or the coins could’ve washed ashore

after a shipwreck.

When Isenberg discovered the

copper coins he also found four

coins that originated from the

Dutch East India Company — with

one dating back to 1690 raising

memories of those early Dutch

seafarers that stepped on Australian

shores well before Cook.

McIntosh wants to answer some of

these mysteries during his planned

expedition to the Wessel Islands in

July.

And it’s not only about revisiting

the beach that was marked with an

‘‘X’’ on Isenberg’s map.

He will also be looking for a secret

cave Aboriginal legends talk about.

This cave is supposed to be close to

the beach where Isenberg once

found the coins and is said to be

filled with doubloons and weaponry

of an ancient era.

Should McIntosh and his team find

what they are looking for, the find

might not only be priceless

treasure, but relics that could

rewrite Australian history.

- AAP

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to be honest though, I think the claim for discovery has to go to the aborigines.

after all, they'd been pottering about around australia for 60,000yrs before anyone else got there.....

Yep for sure.. tho I'm not interested in the stuff about who can claim what... in my opinion if your born in this universe you should be able to go where ever the hell you want as long as you respect it and other people/species... (and can get there lol) i'm more interested in buried treasure and the story of whoever sailed the seas to get there ^^

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Posted (edited)

On another note... i wish i was a "

Goddamn Sexual Tyrannosaur" right now im just a senile sexual administrator

Edited by Silver Surfer
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Yep for sure.. tho I'm not interested in the stuff about who can claim what... in my opinion if your born in this universe you should be able to go where ever the hell you want as long as you respect it and other people/species... (and can get there lol) i'm more interested in buried treasure and the story of whoever sailed the seas to get there ^^

On another note... i wish i was a "

Goddamn Sexual Tyrannosaur" right now im just a senile sexual administrator

.

he he he he.....

I got the quote from blain in 'predator'

(the wielder of 'ol painless', the best BFG in any movie ever!!)

:-)

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"When Isenberg discovered the copper coins he also found four coins that originated from the Dutch East India Company — with one dating back to 1690...."

That right there would seem to blow away any chance that the copper coins were left there 1000 years ago.

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I think the aborigines did a stand-up job of finding oz though. the nearest they could've got is java, and australia's 60m over the horizon, so they can't have known it was there. it'd take a breeding population of at least 20 to get the ball rolling, so that discounts the odd fisherman clinging to a log in a storm & being blown there. then there's the matter of being in a strange land with unknown plants/foodstuffs, and not to mention the fact that EVERYTHING in oz will kill you in the most painful way imaginable!

all in all, not too bad at all!!

:-)

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"When Isenberg discovered the copper coins he also found four coins that originated from the Dutch East India Company — with one dating back to 1690...."

That right there would seem to blow away any chance that the copper coins were left there 1000 years ago.

.

it doesn't really say the coins were left there 1000yrs ago, just that they're around 1000yrs old, but even the coin from the east india co. is from almost 100yrs before cook got there!

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1000 years ago ....

that would fit in with the Ancient China mariners nicely ....

low%20rez%20map.jpg

link

.

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1000 years ago ....

that would fit in with the Ancient China mariners nicely ....

.

.

it says in the article that they suspected trade routs around there from 1000yrs ago, so you may have something there third eye!

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Have to also prove the coins were actually found at the beach in australia

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1000 years ago ....

that would fit in with the Ancient China mariners nicely ....

low%20rez%20map.jpg

link

.

Isn't that map centuries younger than those African coins from the Kilwa Sultanate (1000 CE)?

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Isn't that map centuries younger than those African coins from the Kilwa Sultanate (1000 CE)?

Its the same one but with updated research information we examined about a year ago or so Abe ... the map is younger ... but the map pertains to information centuries older .. or so they suspect or it is believed to be.

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Posted (edited)

.

it doesn't really say the coins were left there 1000yrs ago, just that they're around 1000yrs old, but even the coin from the east india co. is from almost 100yrs before cook got there!

... then there's the matter of being in a strange land with unknown plants/foodstuffs, and not to mention the fact that EVERYTHING in oz will kill you in the most painful way imaginable!

This is true, try living in Far Nth Queensland, my life is in my hands every time I step out the door...

australia-map-meme.jpg

Probably why the Dutch took back off real quick. No thanks, we only deal with, what? The sea? Let's go take some more of that on....and off they went. Rats Nest, I mean Rottnest island didn't do it for them. This island is dangerous to touch at

It also says this place in East Africa they came from only flourished as a trading area to India from the 13th century. So I doubt they are 1000 years old.

Edited by The Puzzler
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LOVING the map puzzler!

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LOVING the map puzzler!

:tu:

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Intriguing article, definitely room to pick a few holes it though...

The best part for me was 'X' marks the spot, classic stuff indeed. ;)

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The best part for me was 'X' marks the spot, classic stuff indeed. ;)

.

you gotta love those ol' pirate movies jchubb!

:-)

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pirates ? this time they've gone too far ...

72182_574173799273438_1841005790_n.jpg

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