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Ohelemapit

HMS Ark Royal Sets Off For Final Voyage

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HMS Ark Royal, the aircraft carrier and former flagship of the Royal Navy fleet, is preparing to set sail for the scrapyard.

The vessel will embark for Turkey and the same shipyard in Leyal that stripped down her sister ship, HMS Invincible. The deal is worth £2.9m.

Crowds - including former crew members - were expected to gather in Portsmouth to see her off at around 1pm.

Ark Royal saw active service based in the Adriatic during the Balkans War and in the Gulf for the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

She was decommissioned as a result of the Strategic Defence and Security Review in 2010.

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Rust in Peace oh metal one :no:

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All things must come to an end.

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Posted (edited)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/leeds/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_8530000/8530169.stm

.

a very sad week for us here in Leeds, as it's the adoptive home of the Ark Royal, and has been for over 70yrs. we've always been proud to be associated with her and the men & women who served on her, fought on her, and lived on her.

but she was the 5th Ark Royal, and no doubt there'll be a sixth, and her & her crew will still have a home here in Yorkshire.

Edited by shrooma
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Rust in Peace oh metal one :no:

So Argentina invades the Falklands tomorrow then? lol

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Posted (edited)

So Argentina invades the Falklands tomorrow then? lol

Many a true word spoken in jest.

Be nat wrooth, my lord, though that I pleye. Ful ofte in game a sooth I have herd saye!

(Monk's Prologue. The Canterbury Tales.)

Edited by ealdwita

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Never understood why they didn't mothball it in dry dock. £2.9m is peanuts in defense equipment terms. The new F35B would have been more than capable of taking off and landing on it. Always worth having a back up, one carrier is always a risky situation. Ships sink, have accidents, get caught in freak weather and naval ships sometimes get destroyed.

Seeing as it had just been re-fitted it all seems such a waste.

Still at least we have the Queen Elizabeth and Prince of Wales in construction, the largest naval vessels the Royal Navy has ever had.

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yeah, the ******* idiotic Cameron Coalition was sanctimoniously saying that "it has saved the taxpayer £100 million". Well, ever thought that it might ******* come in useful, you bunch of pricks? No, just like the good Dr. beeching, the divots know the cost of everything but have no clue about whether it might be useful at some time, do they.

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Never understood why they didn't mothball it in dry dock. £2.9m is peanuts in defense equipment terms. The new F35B would have been more than capable of taking off and landing on it. Always worth having a back up, one carrier is always a risky situation. Ships sink, have accidents, get caught in freak weather and naval ships sometimes get destroyed.

Seeing as it had just been re-fitted it all seems such a waste.

Still at least we have the Queen Elizabeth and Prince of Wales in construction, the largest naval vessels the Royal Navy has ever had.

estimated completion, what, 2020? So yeah, anyone who might want to do anything in which the UK might have an interest is going to politely wait until then, aren't they, so whichever Govt. is in power by then might have the ability to do something about it. Pricks.

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Well that's when air bases come into action, far from ideal.

We should however remember that not many countries have air craft carriers. The French are also in a lousy situation as their nuclear carrier will need a major re-fit along with new reactors in 2015. That is something that can't be done overnight, many years more likely and like the UK have delayed plans for a replacement carrier. Interestingly if it goes ahead it is likely to be built by the same group who are building ours.

The real mess started in the early 2000's when delay after delay stopped them ordering them in time to take over when the navy wanted the Ark Royal and Illustrious to be decommissioned by.

We have a gap, we have to get on with it. It will all feel a lot better when we have the Queen Elizabeth at sea with a deck full of F35B's.

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Posted (edited)

yeah, the ******* idiotic Cameron Coalition was sanctimoniously saying that "it has saved the taxpayer £100 million". Well, ever thought that it might ******* come in useful, you bunch of pricks? No, just like the good Dr. beeching, the divots know the cost of everything but have no clue about whether it might be useful at some time, do they.

The lost power projection doesnt justify a £100 million revenue!

Gay marriage, £10 billion foreign aid budget, slating UKIP, not giving us a EU referendum now, no aircraft carriers, no aircraft to put on them even if we did have some, fiddling of the unemployment figures so people dont realise its 6.3 million, students having to pay higher fees, people being made homeless because of the bedroom tax, immigration through the EU, 150,000 Romanians already here despite promises non would come - this government is on its way out.

Good ridance!

UKIP to form the next Government!

Edited by Giant Killer B
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Surprised they didn't try to sell it to Canada

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Rust in Peace oh metal one :no:

Sink her as a coral reef and she'll put better service in under the water than she ever did on it.

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its a shame when Royal Naval ships get decommissioned and sold. the UK government made a terrible mistake firstly going down to one aircraft carrier, but secondly selling the sea Harriers. we was caught with our pants down when Libya kicked off. it cost us a arm and a leg - because we had to fly our missions from bases, based in mainland Italy and Cyprus.(island) so any money saved or made from selling the sea harriers and in making HMS Illustrious a Helicopter platform was lost. and it showed the massive error of judgment by the government in cost cutting leaving us with no fixed wing carriers.

it'll be 2020 before HMS Queen Elizabeth is fully operational. followed a few years later by HMS prince of Wales. the sailors are already in training based aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. which highlights the ongoing co-operation between both Navies.

picture of HMS Queen Elizabeth

carrier1_2543984k.jpg

a heads up. - on Friday and over the bank holiday weekend, in my home city we'll be commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic. From Friday around two dozen Royal Navy and international warships will be mustering on the Mersey for four days of events, with the highlight being a service of thanksgiving at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on Sunday, followed by a parade from Rodney Street which will feature platoons from the Merchant Navy, RFA, the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force.

Liverpool is to take centre stage as host of the national commemorations for the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic.

From Friday 24 until Tuesday 28 May activities will take place on the waterfront and in the city centre in tribute to the men and women involved in the longest continuous military campaign of Word War II.

From a veterans parades, Lindy Hop flash mobs, a fly past and action packed displays, right through to more than 20 warships arriving in the city – it will be an unmissable bank holiday weekend for all the family.

On 25 and 26 May, from 9.30pm until midnight, two high intensity lasers projected from the Liver Building, transmitting the phrase ‘Thank You’ in Morse Code. This is a nod to British mathematical genius Alan Turing, who helped crack the Enigma Code which saved many lives during the Battle of the Atlantic.

Craig Morrison, the artist responsible for the work, said: “I am thrilled to be showing my Light work, Thank You, at The Battle of the Atlantic Commemorations.

“The lasers will pulse into the heavens, and I sincerely hope that it will provide a fitting memorial to all the men and women who gave their lives in the Second World War.”

From Saturday until Monday from 11am to 5pm, there is a packed programme of events, including a model boat exhibition inside the Liver Building. Many of the vessels lining the waterfront will be open to visitors and a dramatic Battle of the Mersey will see Royal Marine Commandos carry out a fast-roping rescue exercise involving a Royal Navy helicopter and several warships. Further information on the names of the ships visiting Liverpool for BOA70 and times when they are open to visit will be released very shortly.

A Veterans Welcome Centre will also be open all weekend from 12-4pm at the Port of Liverpool Building. Veterans and a guest can take some time away from the hustle and bustle of the Pier Head and enjoy a cup of tea and a biscuit served by the City of Liverpool Sea Cadets.

Other highlights include:

Saturday 25 May

• At 11.30am veterans and their families are invited to gather at the Cunard Building, where a procession led by Chinese lion dancers, Indian drummers and troops from the Polish community (representing the nationalities which made up crew on merchant and royal navy vessels) will head to the Merchant Navy memorial on the Pier Head for a poignant wreath-laying ceremony.

• Just after 1.30pm a Spitfire and Hurricane aircraft will fly over the waterfront in a Battle of Britain memorial flight. (Please note, this is weather dependent)

• The Band of Her Majesty’s Royal Marines will join local artists in a sold-out concert at the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall.

Sunday 26 May

• A private commemorative service will take place at the Anglican Cathedral, followed by a parade at 12.30pm, which includes platoons from the Merchant Navy, Royal Fleet Auxiliary, Regulars, Reservists and Cadets from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force. The route is along Rodney Street, Mount Pleasant, Hope Street, down Upper Duke Street finishing at the Anglican Cathedral.

Monday 27 May

• Organised by the 156 Transport Regiment, around 15 teams made up of ships’ companies and guest visitors including the Merseyside Fire Service will take part in a fun raft race in Salthouse Dock at 1pm.

• A sold-out 40s themes veterans party at St George’s Hall.

Tuesday 28 May

• From 2pm the fleet of vessels will sail out of the city in a spectacular co-ordinated departure.

Liverpool City Council’s cabinet member for culture and tourism, Councillor Wendy Simon, said: “It is a real honour for Liverpool to be the national focus of these 70th anniversary commemorations.

“When it comes to maritime events, Liverpool excels. We’re expecting around 250,000 visitors, and whatever the weather, the city will shine.

“Working in partnership with the Royal and Merchant navies, we are proud to have developed a huge programme consisting of well over 100 events. These will not only be a tribute to those who took part in the Battle of Atlantic, but will also appeal to people of all ages, entertaining them but also teaching them about the sacrifices made for the lives of future generations.”

Rear Admiral Chris Hockley, Flag Officer Regional Forces, said: “Liverpool is absolutely the right place for the national focus on commemorating the Battle of the Atlantic on its 70th anniversary.

“It was the home of the Western Approaches operations room and the receiver of over 1000 convoys, together with ship repair and building activity in support.

“The events planned over the weekend of May 24-28 – the time in 1943 recognised as being the turning point for this long and drawn out battle – will provide a fantastic opportunity for the public to engage with, and learn more about, those who made such a vital contribution, including Merchant and Royal Navy veterans.”

Chairman of the Liverpool Retired Merchant Seafarers Association, Pat Moran, said: “Liverpool took the men and women of every maritime nation to crew her ships, particularly from the Commonwealth and Empire.

“It is the achievements of these men and women and Liverpool’s own sons and daughters that the cavalcade will celebrate. If you love Liverpool and the people who made her great you must come and take part.”

Merseyside engineering firm Cammell Laird is the main sponsor of Battle of the Atlantic 70th Anniversary commemoration weekend.

For full details of all the events taking place, the location and times visit www.itsliverpool.com/culture and click on ‘On the Waterfront’.

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Surprised they didn't try to sell it to Canada

If they had, it'd still be a useful NATO asset.

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Posted (edited)

The Harriers would have only been a tiny stop gap. Most of there air miles on their air frames would have been depleted by 2015/16. Carriers are very hard on aircrafts, they were trying to stretch their life out way before by only placing them on the ships in absolutely vital situations. The majority of the time they were stored in Gibraltar. When Iraq kicked off the second time it took ages to get Ark Royal to Gibraltar, loaded and on her way to Iraq. It kind of defeats the object of having small, light, fast carriers.

The other thing is any half decent air force with half decent modern planes would have run rings round them. Harriers were often escorted and used in a ground attack role. Brilliant aircraft but subsonic, rather short range however they had a fairly decent payload (nowhere near the F35B though). Questions would also have to be asked if they would have been capable of defending the carrier against faster more agile aircraft. Especially now that relatively cheap, fast, well armed drones are becoming common place.

Obviously not a problem in Iraq or afghanistan.

Edited by skookum
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The Harriers would have only been a tiny stop gap. Most of there air miles on their air frames would have been depleted by 2015/16. Carriers are very hard on aircrafts, they were trying to stretch their life out way before by only placing them on the ships in absolutely vital situations. The majority of the time they were stored in Gibraltar. When Iraq kicked off the second time it took ages to get Ark Royal to Gibraltar, loaded and on her way to Iraq. It kind of defeats the object of having small, light, fast carriers.

The other thing is any half decent air force with half decent modern planes would have run rings round them. Harriers were often escorted and used in a ground attack role. Brilliant aircraft but subsonic, rather short range however they had a fairly decent payload (nowhere near the F35B though). Questions would also have to be asked if they would have been capable of defending the carrier against faster more agile aircraft. Especially now that relatively cheap, fast, well armed drones are becoming common place.

Obviously not a problem in Iraq or afghanistan.

If Argentina, and their SA allies including Brazil which has an aircraft carrier, invade the Falklands before 2020 there isnt a thing we can do about it.

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Posted (edited)

If Argentina, and their SA allies including Brazil which has an aircraft carrier, invade the Falklands before 2020 there isnt a thing we can do about it.

The Argies don't have an effective Air force, and I doubt half a dozen old Harriers would be much use against very modern Mirage 2000C the Brazilians have.

We had a very big air advantage last time due to the newly acquired and upgraded Sidewinder missile. It took tonnes of negotiations to get them in time from the reluctant yanks. Even Harrier pilots admitted if they didn't have the latest the story may well have been very different.

We do have a number of Typhoons stationed there just in case and don't forget it took just one ageing Nuclear sub using WW2 torpedoes to sink their flag ship and send their fleet fleeing back to base cutting off re-supply.

Back in the 1980's we had about 20 marines stationed there with no air support. Now we have a substantial garrison about 1200, with modern air support. We have the Type 45 destroyer and at least one sub on patrol all the time.

http://en.wikipedia....alkland_Islands

If there is an invasion, it will take a lot more than a fairly badly equipped bunch of conscripts. A invading force would also have to expect major casualties as islands even fairly lightly defended can be notoriously difficult to take, even if you do you then need re-supply which is a nightmare with subs milling around.

Edited by skookum
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Posted (edited)

All things must come to an end.

Very sad, hmm.

Reminds me of an interview Julian Fellowes made. He grew up hearing stories how at the turn of the last century the nobility had to let go of their servants and those who later inherited turned the old servants quarters into other types of rooms. The end of an era indeed.

Castles too once had their use but guns made them obsolete. It was all for a short time anyways, from the time iron and weapons advanced in Europe which allowed knights, to the their end, was not a long time.

Germany had around 250 cities in the 1100s and over 2000 in the 1200s. Urbanization, trade, the wide use of minting coins, all made for vast changes especially allowing guilds and specialized products to flourish which included weapons, leather work made in tanning mills, nailed horseshoes, the stirrup, the saddle, all were invented in this era.

Industrialization saw the first iron ships and they won't be around forever either. Huge naval and land battles seem widely obsolete now or rapidly becoming so at any rate.

The era of the Concorde was even more narrow and it was even sadder when the last one flew and landed.

More exciting, is what is next, in this new era of globalization.

Edited by Leave Britney alone!

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Posted (edited)

You're looking forward to the new era of globalisation? Are you anticipating that it will mean that there will be no more War, and swords will be beaten into ploughshares?

Edited by Colonel Rhuairidh

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Posted (edited)

twice, in fact :unsure2:

Edited by Colonel Rhuairidh
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War will continue in other forms.

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Posted (edited)

A few episodes of Defense News, specifically the pieces hosted by Vago Muradian, might help you better understand.

I think there is an imperative to do things differently. It's driven not only by the budget but more importantly by changing operating and strategic environments around the world. We're simply not going to have the luxury of fighting in the same styles that we've become accustomed to. Power projection is getting a lot tougher, anti-acess and area denial threats are growing around the world. We're going to have to change the patterns in which we deploy our forces,, in which we operate, and which we sustain those forces logistically over time.

—Jim Thomas

===============================================================

You're looking forward to the new era of globalisation? Are you anticipating that it will mean that there will be no more War, and swords will be beaten into ploughshares?

What is your view of globalization? Do you think it is a threat? Or do you hold a more sophisticated and realistic view?

Edited by Leave Britney alone!

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What is your view of globalization? Do you think it is a threat? Or do you hold a more sophisticated and realistic view?

Depends what you mean by Globalisation. if it means what evangelists for unrestrained Capitalism mean, where the multinational megacorporations have an unlimited pool of cheap labour to exploit, then yes, it is, but if we're talking about One World Government and all those things that Conspiracy theorists are so paranoid about, then frankly I don't think it need necessarily be altogether a bad thing, given the incompetence of most national governments and their endless silly squabbling.

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Globalization is simply a one world government, we will decide how it is shaped.

First we had tribes, then clans, then kingdoms, followed by empires, somewhere along we also had city-states, then nation-states, supranational unions (EU is the first example) will be the next stage, then finally a one world government.

Each stage feels the next is a threat and a loss of freedom. Well history moves in one direction.

Too many are afraid, but it is understandable, which is why internationalists move slowly and quietly.

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Globalization is simply a one world government, we will decide how it is shaped.

First we had tribes, then clans, then kingdoms, followed by empires, somewhere along we also had city-states, then nation-states, supranational unions (EU is the first example) will be the next stage, then finally a one world government.

Each stage feels the next is a threat and a loss of freedom. Well history moves in one direction.

Too many are afraid, but it is understandable, which is why internationalists move slowly and quietly.

history moves in one direction.

nonsense. ever been to the congo?

a load of pseudo-intellectual tosh.

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