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Kowalski

Power To The Parents

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POWER TO THE PARENTS: THE FIGHT FOR HOME-SCHOOL RIGHTS

Editor’s note: For TheBlaze Magazine‘s June cover story, Assistant Editor Sharon Ambrose dug into the history and success of — and Progressive attacks on — home-schooling.

What she found was, despite a history of proven great accomplishment in the home-education movement, the Left continues to wage war on home-schoolers. And these attacks aren’t new.

Progressives first made the case in the early 20th century that government control trumps the rights of parents. What will the assault look like in the 21st century?

Every issue of TheBlaze Magazine contains exclusive content not found anywhere else — online or in print. The magazine’s stories, research and special reports are reserved for subscribers to the print and/or digital edition.

Below are a few excerpts from the June 2013 cover story, “Government Rule vs. Home-School: Parental Guidance Not Suggested.” Get the full story only in the June issue of TheBlaze Magazine.

Angie Blad never planned on home-schooling her children.

The Nebraska mother of six sent her kids to the local public schools without a second thought. That is until her son, then in first grade, was not allowed to participate in a classroom learning game because he was winning too much. Instead of participating, the teacher had him sit in a rocking chair while the other students engaged in the competition.

When Blad contacted the teacher, she was told that, because no advanced programming was available for students until third grade, her son would have to sit out sometimes to allow other students the chance to succeed. This incident led Blad and her husband to start considering home-schooling as an option. That was three years ago. Today, while one of Blad’s children remains in a special education public school program, the other five are being educated at home.

For more, see: http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/05/23/power-to-the-parents-the-fight-for-home-school-rights/

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I'd home school my kids, personally.

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I can understand why the teacher did that. This kid was exceptionally smart and the other kids never had a chance to win against him and therefore were probably not participating like they should.

I noticed she didn't want to take the time with her kid that needed special education. That kid probably needs more attention than the others.

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I'd home school my kids, personally.

If you want them to learn, it's probably a good idea. I'm going the easy route and not having any. I don't want to raise any in this craphole of a world.

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If you want them to learn, it's probably a good idea. I'm going the easy route and not having any. I don't want to raise any in this craphole of a world.

I'm with you there :w00t: but accidents can and will happen :innocent:

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Posted (edited)

I'd home school my kids, personally.

Such a hard decision though. If I have kids I want them to question everything and be taught much better than in school. I don't want them "indoctrinated". But it's the social aspect I worry about. Bullying is a huge issue, but for the friends they could potentially make and the experiences they might miss out on. I guess you'd have to try and get your child to attend some social clubs or something. Well even better take your child to social events. Camping or something like that would be good. Nature, and survival skills, probably the best things you can pass down to a child really. On topic though, it should definitly be a free choice by the parents how thye educate their children. Government should never be able to force schooling.

Edited by Coffey
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Such a hard decision though. If I have kids I want them to question everything and be taught much better than in school. I don't want them "indoctrinated". But it's the social aspect I worry about. Bullying is a huge issue, but for the friends they could potentially make and the experiences they might miss out on. I guess you'd have to try and get your child to attend some social clubs or something. Well even better take your child to social events. Camping or something like that would be good. Nature, and survival skills, probably the best things you can pass down to a child really. On topic though, it should definitly be a free choice by the parents how thye educate their children. Government should never be able to force schooling.

Absolutely, gotta ensure they're fed socially too. Sadly, I could imagine governments banning home schooling in the future and claim that it's some form of neglect and if you don't send them to state school...they take them away.

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Absolutely, gotta ensure they're fed socially too. Sadly, I could imagine governments banning home schooling in the future and claim that it's some form of neglect and if you don't send them to state school...they take them away.

Yeah I wouldn't be surprised. Probably blame nut cases doing shootings as social outcasts who didn't attend public schools or something.

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Yeah I wouldn't be surprised. Probably blame nut cases doing shootings as social outcasts who didn't attend public schools or something.

Lol right!!!

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I'm definitely homeschooling my son when he's old enough. Already working on his English Literature Curriculum....

:)

On another note, I was homeschooled for my last years in High School, which allowed me to graduate earlier and I was able to take college level courses online, that were not available at the public High School. My husband was homeschooled, also.

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Posted (edited)

I find the idea of home schooling more natural than what we have now. After all, parents school their offspring in the wild. Teaching comes best from your mom and dad, imo.

Edited by Heaven Is A Halfpipe
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Sadly home schooling is not possible for many... Sometimes the parents just aren't good educators, and sometimes they just don't have the time or resources to do it (both have to work, etc)... (Remember - some parents are just rock stupid too...)

Equally sadly, home schooling is necessary...

The socializing shouldn't be a major problem - just get your kids to play/interact with other kids when not in class...

I would not be surprised to find neighborhood parents "clubbing together" to form their own 'home school district' and combining their time/ skills and resources to teach their children collectively...

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Sadly home schooling is not possible for many... Sometimes the parents just aren't good educators, and sometimes they just don't have the time or resources to do it (both have to work, etc)... (Remember - some parents are just rock stupid too...)

Equally sadly, home schooling is necessary...

The socializing shouldn't be a major problem - just get your kids to play/interact with other kids when not in class...

I would not be surprised to find neighborhood parents "clubbing together" to form their own 'home school district' and combining their time/ skills and resources to teach their children collectively...

I know. It's a difficult decision. But there are a lot different things you can do from home, and there are certain jobs you can do from home also, so it's not as limited as it used to be for stay at home, homeschooling mothers. It just depends on priorities. Is it more important for you to bring in that paycheck to pay off another brand new car, or is your child's education and well being more important?

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I know. It's a difficult decision. But there are a lot different things you can do from home, and there are certain jobs you can do from home also, so it's not as limited as it used to be for stay at home, homeschooling mothers. It just depends on priorities. Is it more important for you to bring in that paycheck to pay off another brand new car, or is your child's education and well being more important?

These days it's more about keeping a roof over your head and putting food on the table for most (not to mention saving for your -home schooled - kids college)...

One advantage to home schooling is that BOTH parents can participate... The one with the full time - away from home job - can pitch in after coming home - class hours don't have to be 7 to 3 (or when ever)

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These days it's more about keeping a roof over your head and putting food on the table for most (not to mention saving for your -home schooled - kids college)...

One advantage to home schooling is that BOTH parents can participate... The one with the full time - away from home job - can pitch in after coming home - class hours don't have to be 7 to 3 (or when ever)

Your right. Some people really don't have choice. They both have to work to make ends meet.

But, I do see people, who could homeschool their kids but they don't want to give up their lifestyle of going to the nail salon, having a brand new car, Iphone, etc. What's really sad is the people who think they can't live without these things. :no:

I know of many stories about stay at home mom's who have run business's from home, and were able to homeschool their children too. So you don't necessarily have to give up your job to stay at home with your child. There are alot of different options out there nowadays. I wish you could have a type of "communal" homeschooling like you suggested in one post. Maybe parents could get together and homeschool their children together, with one parent teaching whenever that person is off, and they can all take turns....Or maybe one of the parents who works from home or something, can teach the kids.....

That'd be pretty neat....

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Your right. Some people really don't have choice. They both have to work to make ends meet.

But, I do see people, who could homeschool their kids but they don't want to give up their lifestyle of going to the nail salon, having a brand new car, Iphone, etc. What's really sad is the people who think they can't live without these things. :no:

I know of many stories about stay at home mom's who have run business's from home, and were able to homeschool their children too. So you don't necessarily have to give up your job to stay at home with your child. There are alot of different options out there nowadays. I wish you could have a type of "communal" homeschooling like you suggested in one post. Maybe parents could get together and homeschool their children together, with one parent teaching whenever that person is off, and they can all take turns....Or maybe one of the parents who works from home or something, can teach the kids.....

That'd be pretty neat....

If you think about it, a group of parents doing the teaching would bring in so many varied and different skill sets to teach that a "real school" would be hard pressed to match...

Just my background: Electronics (so math as well as computer skills/electronics), drafting (three years of architectural training - though non degreed), history, general science and sociology, not to mention the outdoors skills... Other parents could bring in financial skills, arts and crafts, language skills (I'm way too rusty for this), literature, mechanical skills (I'm all thumbs), home-economics, higher math - the whole spectrum...

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The one with the full time - away from home job - can pitch in after coming home

Holy crap, I got exhausted just thinking about doing that.

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Holy crap, I got exhausted just thinking about doing that.

Just think of it as helping with their homework...

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I don't know what schooling is like in the US or UK, but here in my corner of Queensland there are all sorts of schools, including the one I work at which is a proudly "Independent" school, it focuses on such things as play, self-directed and -instigated learning and challenging yourself.

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It should probably be left up to parents as to how their children are educated. I just don't like the idea of government making these sorts of decisions for us.

If education is mandated, in any form.. what else might be mandated? .. " for the good of the children , of course " Maybe mandatory military service might next be decided to be 'beneficial'. How about public servitude? to build character!

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George Washington University Law professor Catherine J. Ross wrote in a 2010 scholarly article that “in order for the norm of tolerance to survive across generations, society need not and should not tolerate the inculcation of absolutist views that undermine tolerance of difference.” She added, “The state can and should limit the ability of intolerant home-schoolers to inculcate hostility to difference in their children.”

Law professor Martha Albertson Fineman of Emory University wrote in 2009, “The risk that parents or private schools unfairly impose hierarchical or oppressive beliefs on their children is magnified by the absence of state oversight or the application of any particular educational standards. The more appropriate suggestion for our current educational dilemma is that public education should be mandatory and universal.”

Now we can see what this is really about. On average home school kids are far more intelligent then thier public school peer's. This isnt about quality of education. This is about conforming.

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I'm definitely homeschooling my son when he's old enough. Already working on his English Literature Curriculum....

:)

On another note, I was homeschooled for my last years in High School, which allowed me to graduate earlier and I was able to take college level courses online, that were not available at the public High School. My husband was homeschooled, also.

Ron Paul is coming out with a home school program this year. From what I read about it, Im very impressed. I dont have time to home school, though I spend alot of time wishing I did. But Rons program is free up till the 6th grade, so im gonna use it as much as I can after his school day.

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George Washington University Law professor Catherine J. Ross wrote in a 2010 scholarly article that “in order for the norm of tolerance to survive across generations, society need not and should not tolerate the inculcation of absolutist views that undermine tolerance of difference.” She added, “The state can and should limit the ability of intolerant home-schoolers to inculcate hostility to difference in their children.”

Law professor Martha Albertson Fineman of Emory University wrote in 2009, “The risk that parents or private schools unfairly impose hierarchical or oppressive beliefs on their children is magnified by the absence of state oversight or the application of any particular educational standards. The more appropriate suggestion for our current educational dilemma is that public education should be mandatory and universal.”

Now we can see what this is really about. On average home school kids are far more intelligent then thier public school peer's. This isnt about quality of education. This is about conforming.

Wanted to add another point. This person actualy said home school needs to be banned cause of how home school kids (who hardly interact with public school kids) treat kids in public schools. Are you freakin kidding me??????? Get a grip on how public school kids treat each other before you worry about how people who hardly even see each other are treating them. NTM, if anything, Im sure home schooled kids have far more to worry about how they are treated by public school kids then the other way around. This women actualy said "The state can and should limit the ability of intolerant home-schoolers to inculcate hostility to difference in their children.” WHAT???? And just how should the "state" go about doing that????

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Wanted to add another point. This person actualy said home school needs to be banned cause of how home school kids (who hardly interact with public school kids) treat kids in public schools. Are you freakin kidding me??????? Get a grip on how public school kids treat each other before you worry about how people who hardly even see each other are treating them. NTM, if anything, Im sure home schooled kids have far more to worry about how they are treated by public school kids then the other way around. This women actualy said "The state can and should limit the ability of intolerant home-schoolers to inculcate hostility to difference in their children.” WHAT???? And just how should the "state" go about doing that????

These liberals are talking about indoctrination.

Indoctrination is the process of inculcating ideas, attitudes, cognitive strategies or a professional methodology (see doctrine).[1] It is often distinguished from education by the fact that the indoctrinated person is expected not to question or critically examine the doctrine they have learned.[2] As such the term may be used pejoratively, often in the context of education, political opinions, theology or religious dogma.

Might want to check this out to:

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I don't home school my 2 children. The local school is good and my wife and I both work.

I assume most state's are the same, but I don't know.

In Indiana:

This document is provided upon request to all citizens interested in public and nonpublic education. Any public or nonpublic educator having questions about home education may contact the Indiana Department of Education.

Getting Started


  • RESEARCH HOME EDUCATION: Before you transfer your child from a traditional school, learn all you can. Talk to other home educators, read books about home education, learn about homeschool law in Indiana, "comparison shop" for a curriculum for your school.

  • TRANSFER YOUR CHILD AND NOTIFY HIS OR HER CURRENT PRINCIPAL, IN WRITING, OF YOUR DECISION: While the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) issues school numbers to all private schools after they report their grade level enrollment data as required by Indiana law, you do not need a homeschool number prior to transferring your child and beginning home instruction. However, you do need to let the public school know why your child is no longer in attendance or he or she may be considered truant.

  • REQUEST A COPY OF YOUR CHILD'S PUBLIC SCHOOL RECORDS: You are entitled to a copy of these public school records, both as a school administrator and as the parent of a minor child, under state law and the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Please note that this does not apply to private school records.

Homeschool Law

In addition to reporting your enrollment, Indiana law requires the following of all homeschools and other nonaccredited, private schools:


  • 180 DAYS OF INSTRUCTION: You decide which days your school will be in session, and how long to teach each day. In the case of mid-year transfers, days attended at the first school count toward the 180 day total at the homeschool.

  • ATTENDANCE RECORDS: There is no special form for these records, which are used to verify private school attendance. Please note that the law allows local public school superintendents to request copies of your child's attendance records to verify attendance.

  • INSTRUCTION EQUIVALENT TO THAT GIVEN IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS: State law does not define equivalency of instruction for public or private schools. If there is ever a question of educational neglect, keeping good attendance records and other documentation regarding attendance and continuing educational activity is highly instrumental in addressing these concerns.

  • CURRICULUM: State law exempts home schools from the curriculum and program requirements which public schools must follow.

Homeschool Organizations

While not a source for textbooks, these organizations can provide guidance about local support groups, choosing curricula, and the "how to's" of home education.

Books and Curricula

THERE IS NO STATE-APPROVED CURRICULUM FOR HOME EDUCATION AT ANY GRADE LEVEL, NOR ARE THERE STATE-APPROVED OR MANDATED TEXTBOOKS. Indiana law gives home educators the flexibility to choose the curriculum and textbooks they feel will most benefit their children.

THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DOES NOT PROVIDE BOOKS OR CURRICULA FOR HOME EDUCATION AT ANY GRADE LEVEL. Many home educators use correspondence programs to teach their children. The following names and numbers are included to assist you as you start your search; however, there are many others available.

THIS LIST DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ACCREDITATION OR ENDORSEMENT OF THESE PROGRAMS BY THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. You must contact the programs directly for answers to your questions about their prices and the comprehensiveness of their curricula: High School Only: Indiana University (Accredited diploma**) (800) 334-1011 American School (Accredited diploma**) (800) 531-9268 Univ. of Nebraska (Accredited diploma**) (888) 482-5598 Allied National High School (Accredited diploma*) (800) 968-4034

* Accreditation is through the Western Association of Colleges and Schools, not through the Indiana Department of Education.

** Accreditation is through the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, not through the Indiana Department of Education. Elementary/Middle/High School: The Calvert School (K- 8) (888) 487-4652 Abeka (K-12) (800) 874-3592 IndyPlus (K-12) (800) 267-0160

** Accreditation is through the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, not through the Indiana Department of Education.

General Information

HOME EDUCATED STUDENTS ARE NOT DROPOUTS. They are transfer students who keep their DRIVER'S LICENSES upon withdrawal.


  • If you are home educating a SPECIAL NEEDS CHILD, referrals may be available from one of the homeschool organizations listed above. Under 20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(10), children with disabilities enrolled in homeschools have the same genuine opportunities for participation in IDEA funded programs (through the public schools) as children with disabilities enrolled in an accredited, nonpublic school.

  • WORK PERMITS must be obtained from the issuing officer at a local public or accredited private school. Homeschooled students are bound by the same child labor regulations that bind all other students. For more information, contact the Indiana Department of Labor at (888) 833-6967 or visit the child labor web page.

  • While encouraged, KINDERGARTEN is not mandatory in Indiana. Children are to be enrolled and attending school in the fall of the school year during which they turn seven, unless their parents choose to home educate. Home educated children are to begin school no later than their seventh birthday.

  • Participation in Elementary or Junior High ATHLETICS is at the discretion of the public school. Participation in HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETICS is rare, as the home educated child's educational program must also conform to the bylaws of the Indiana High School Athletic Association (IHSAA).
    Such participation is subject to approval by the public school, and to the home educator's willingness to enroll the child in public school for at least three classes per day and in two additional classes (ie, correspondence, vocational, post-secondary) that are approved by the public school. The child's participation must otherwise comply with the by laws of the IHSAA. For specifics, contact the IHSAA at (317) 846-6601.

  • Participation in public school EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES is also at the discretion of the public school.

  • Under Indiana law, students enrolled in non-accredited, private schools (including, but not limited to, homeschools) ARE NOT ELIGIBLE FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY SCHOLARS PROGRAM.

Testing

State law does not require ISTEP+, or any other testing, for children in homeschools. In fact, home educated children may not take ISTEP+ unless they are also enrolled in a public school for at least one period per day. The Department of Education recommends periodic, standardized achievement testing for homeschooled children. If you wish, you may be able to arrange for private testing at one of the following:

Indiana University

Institute for Child Study

201 N. Rose Ave.

Bloomington, IN 47405

(812) 856-8303

Greater Lafayette Area Special Services

(765) 449-3208

Bob Jones University

Testing Services

(800) 845-5731

T.E.A.C.H.

308 E. Main St.

Fairland, IN 46126

(317) 835-0326

University of Evansville

Dr. Nealon Gaskey, EdD

School of Education

1800 Lincoln Avenue

Evansville IN 47722

(812) 479-2367

Getting a Diploma

Homeschooled children will not receive a diploma from the local public school or from the state. The IDOE suggests you use an accredited correspondence program which grants a diploma upon completion.

Students who are issued a diploma by the administrator (parent or legal guardian) of an Indiana homeschool possess a legally issued, non-accredited diploma according to the State of Indiana. Homeschools, like all other non-accredited, nonpublic schools, may legally issue a diploma to students that complete the graduation requirements of that school, as established by that school.

Indiana law requires homeschools to give instruction equivalent to public schools but does not bind any requirements set forth with regard to curriculum or the content of educational programs offered by the school.

Seventeen-year-old home educated students may choose to take the general equivalency exam to earn a general educational development certificate (GED). A homeschool number is required for a student to take the GED at 17, but not to take GED classes. The forms required for participation in GED testing are available at local GED testing sites, or from www.gedtest.org.

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