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Still Waters

Preserved Mammoth found with flowing blood

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Scientists say they have managed to find mammoth blood during the excavation of a grown female animal on the Lyakhovsky Islands, the southernmost group of the New Siberian Islands in the Arctic seas of northeastern Russia.

The dark blood was found in ice cavities below the belly of the animal. When researchers broke the cavities with a poll pick, the blood came flowing out. The fact surprised them because the temperature was 10C below zero.

http://rt.com/news/m...ce-siberia-908/

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Three adult mammoth carcasses, including the latest discovery of the Yakut scientists, have been found in the history of paleontology. However, despite such a good state of preservation, the scientists have not yet found enough living cells for cloning the species. Grigoriev noted that the repair of DNA is a very complex process that can take years.

The latest discovery and its research heralds the possibility of bringing the animal back to life in the future, though there is a lot of controversy around the issue of cloning.

from OP link

Oh dear ... fresh mammoth steaks anyone >?

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Here we go for a real life Jurrasic Park.

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Tip for would-be paleontologists..............

Always include a Tax Inspector in your team - whatever you find - he'll get blood out of it!

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Oh dear ... fresh mammoth steaks anyone >?

I have heard that the Russians did eat the meat from wooly mammoths that they had excavated in the past.

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I have heard that the Russians did eat the meat from wooly mammoths that they had excavated in the past.

Yes I've heard ... this is one up and better don't you think ... ? If they do clone ... sooner or later they'll end up on the grill somewhere

;)

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I have heard that the Russians did eat the meat from wooly mammoths that they had excavated in the past.

Talk about freezer-burnt - wow

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Oh dear ... fresh mammoth steaks anyone >?

.

there's good eatin' on them thar mammoths!

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This is taking too long.

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Is it possible that the mammoth had not long died

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You need not worry about this one. It's when they(scientists)find viable raptor blood, then we might have a problem.

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Mammoths are only being cloned because 1. It's a scientific goal to achieve and 2. They are going to be able to survive tough winter conditions in places like Serbia and so on.

They are also multi-purpose, with meat for food, wool for clothes, skin for leather, tusks for various things. Plus, the creature is large and therefore could sustain a large population. The trick will be domesticating and finding food for it to eat.

This is an important step in both science and human development. Mammoths could allow previously inhospitable places easier to survive in. No need to worry about them being eaten by something as I doubt much could take one down, lots of uses and hardy.

All this does in terms of Jurassic Park is open up the possibility that there is frozen blood of a dinosaur somewhere that could be used. However, would there be much use for them? Who knows.

As for viable "raptor" blood, you need to specify which raptor. Bambiraptors are only 1.3 metres in size... Velociraptors are also small. Utah Raptors are the ones to worry about the most though. There are lots of other dinosaurs though, but chances of finding even one with blood.....

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Yeah, don't do that.

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Once an animal has gone extinct it needs to stay gone.

bringing species back could have tragic consequences for the current food chain and nature in general.

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Posted (edited)

I disagree that once an animal has gone extinct it needs to stay gone. Nature screws stuff up all the time and there have been many, many disasters and mass extinctions caused by nature. It will happen again. We are in a unique position with the ability to manipulate nature and we would be wise to learn as much as we can, and learn quickly, the consequences of not learning for the sake of "not upsetting the balance of nature" when the balance of nature is always being upset by other natural disasters and phenomena would be worse than then consequences of tinkering and learning in my opinion.

Not tinkering with nature and not learning valuable information= balanced nature for now, eventual destruction later on with natural disasters/asteroid wiping out the earth.

Tinkering with nature and potentially learning valuable information= possibly upsetting the balance of nature now, with the potential for valuable knowledge that could help us one day leave this earth and travel the stars, help us one day cure diseases, help us one day to better predict and understand the consequences of natural disasters.

We will go extinct one day if we don't keep pushing the boundaries, that is for certain. If we keep pushing the boundaries we might discover some truly marvelous things that will allow us to do things that we can only imagine right now. WE MUST KEEP PUSHING

Nature gave us our brains and our curiosity, we would be wise to use them.

Edited by Einsteinium
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Interesting possibility.

Heck, I'm all for it. It's not like it's a T-rex or something.

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Posted (edited)

Once an animal has gone extinct it needs to stay gone.

bringing species back could have tragic consequences for the current food chain and nature in general.

Or it could have just the opposite effect. If mammoths were a part of the arctic ecosystem and now they are gone, then a piece of that system is missing. In tropical areas like Africa, elephants keep waterholes open for other wildlife during the dry season; it is possible that the mammoths benefited wild life in their environment in some way that we know nothing about.

Then too, what was the cause of their extinction? If primitive man drove them to extinction then perhaps we have an obligation to try and restore them. There are already parks being started in areas of the tundra where various grazing animals (musk oxen, bison, wild horses) have been reintroduced and the tundra is returning to its former grassland environment, one capable of sustaining large herbivores. The mammoth would be just another addition. There have been studies down that prove the more animals you have on the land the more fertile it becomes, as long as you rotate them to new areas. It is the lack of grazing and animal dung that causes infertility, erosion and low species diversity in the land.

The tourist dollars alone would help the local economy. The research into recreating extinct species would be advanced. An iconic beast would roam the wilds once more. Seems like a win/win and I don't see a down side, it's not like they are going to run amok in downtown Moscow or Ontario.

Edited by Sundew
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Actually the ecological niche the Mammoth lived in needs to be rebuilt. The entire food chain of its natural habitat should be in place before any such project is undertaken. Granted they could be kept in a zoo like environment until things like natural predators are in place. Just look at the damage wild Elephants do in Africa and India. Bringing back an animal just for scientific curiosity just isn't right. We would end up opening a hunting season or domestication for food. Does this sound like a good reason to bring back a noble beast from the past. I say let the species rest. Another point to consider is that not all were flash frozen and the species died out in other remote locations for a reason. Genetics, disease or predation? We really don't know for sure. I hope that these researchers are treating this organic material as a bio-hazard until we know more about their demise. It would be a sad thing to reintroduce yet again another plague on the planet.

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That is awesome. I can't wait until they successfully clone one.

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Begun the Clone Wars have...

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They are also multi-purpose, with meat for food, wool for clothes, skin for leather, tusks for various things. Plus, the creature is large and therefore could sustain a large population. The trick will be domesticating and finding food for it to eat.

This is an important step in both science and human development. Mammoths could allow previously inhospitable places easier to survive in. No need to worry about them being eaten by something as I doubt much could take one down, lots of uses and hardy.

Oh yea good call man ><.. so we bring back Mammoths so we can domesticate them.. eat them and clothe ourselves. Lucky MAMMOTH!

Poor b******* would rather stay dead i think then come back for your uses.

Do you eat blue whale for dinner?

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Mammoths are only being cloned because 1. It's a scientific goal to achieve and 2. They are going to be able to survive tough winter conditions in places like Serbia and so on.

They are also multi-purpose, with meat for food, wool for clothes, skin for leather, tusks for various things. Plus, the creature is large and therefore could sustain a large population. The trick will be domesticating and finding food for it to eat.

This is an important step in both science and human development. Mammoths could allow previously inhospitable places easier to survive in. No need to worry about them being eaten by something as I doubt much could take one down, lots of uses and hardy.

All this does in terms of Jurassic Park is open up the possibility that there is frozen blood of a dinosaur somewhere that could be used. However, would there be much use for them? Who knows.

As for viable "raptor" blood, you need to specify which raptor. Bambiraptors are only 1.3 metres in size... Velociraptors are also small. Utah Raptors are the ones to worry about the most though. There are lots of other dinosaurs though, but chances of finding even one with blood.....

To be honest, if we could domesticate Raptors, they would make amazing pets. Look at loads of predator animals we have domesticated that are used in hunts. Image having a pack of raptors to help you hunt down your prey, because these creatures are so well adapt at hunting their prey.

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The one best thing I've dreamed to see before I die was to see a real living dinosaur of sorts living walking and breathing.. this will be the most beautiful thing I've seen to walk in my eternal life if this gets successfully .. my uncle was eduard Storch. This was his dying dream, and my own!

The one best thing I've dreamed to see before I die was to see a real living dinosaur of sorts living walking and breathing.. this will be the most beautiful thing I've seen to walk in my eternal life if this gets successfully .. my uncle was eduard Storch. This was his dying dream, and my own!

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So now we have the ability to recreate a being that passed on many many years ago.My question is,do we really want this?The dinosaurs passed away with the disputed reasoning as to why.So,how could man survive with the threat of a being that threatens his livelihood?

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