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Ape-like feet found in Humans

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Scientists have discovered that about one in thirteen people have flexible ape-like feet.

A team studied the feet of 398 visitors to the Boston Museum of Science.

The results show differences in foot bone structure similar to those seen in fossils of a member of the human lineage from two million years ago.

It is hoped the research, published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, will establish how that creature moved.

*Snip*

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-22728014

Edited by Still Waters
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Huh, interesting, though I guess it doesn't surprise me that much.

What does surprise me is the "1 in 13". I would have thought it to be more common. Guess not.

The issue with climbing trees makes sense.

Almost seems like a lost adaptation, not that we need it now.

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Maybe the people in or near Boston are just defective?

But, seriously, that fact is kind of interesting and so now will take up another cell in my brain that I won't have for using at work anymore....

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Maybe the people in or near Boston are just defective?

But, seriously, that fact is kind of interesting and so now will take up another cell in my brain that I won't have for using at work anymore....

You have more than one brain cell? Mine reduced to only one, so I have to be careful...

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pantufa+hobbit.jpg

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It would be interesting to see the stats and ethnicity of the participants.

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It would be interesting to see the stats and ethnicity of the participants.

Ooohh! You don't want to go there!

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pantufa+hobbit.jpg

Nice. Hobbit feet?

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My feet have always been an odd design, But when spending your childhood playing in creeks ("the bush") jumping from rock to rock nd whatnot. You can expect to have agile feet.

But the question is of 2; Did the feet adapt to the enviroment? Or was it the ape/hunter gatherer dna that made the children go into the wild?

*Re-reading this it slightly comes off as a forest people society, lol! this is not the case, just our fun as young kids was adventuring through the wilderness and forgetting how far we had actually gone and rushing to try get home by night. To the point where I look back on that now and try analyse it, there must of been someone watching over us all those years... because there is some dangerous animals, where I live as I came to find out as I got older.

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I grew up just west of the international date line just north of the equator. A small island in the Pacific ocean. As a child I spent a lot of my time barefoot. Swimming, climbing trees (mostly Palms for the Coconuts) and wading in the shallows looking for shells. Looking back my feet worked a lot differently then than they do now. When climbing a tree I would put my soles against the trunk and cup them to get a better grip. Sometimes I would climb the palms, like the natives, by tying a string between my big toes and hopping up the trees. Now that I have worn shoes for more than 40 years I find my feet are much more rigid and my locomotion is different. The human body adapts to the conditions that are most common. The folks that had a more flexible foot probably go barefoot more often. Some may even play the game of picking up marbles and such.

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I grew up just west of the international date line just north of the equator. A small island in the Pacific ocean. As a child I spent a lot of my time barefoot. Swimming, climbing trees (mostly Palms for the Coconuts) and wading in the shallows looking for shells. Looking back my feet worked a lot differently then than they do now. When climbing a tree I would put my soles against the trunk and cup them to get a better grip. Sometimes I would climb the palms, like the natives, by tying a string between my big toes and hopping up the trees. Now that I have worn shoes for more than 40 years I find my feet are much more rigid and my locomotion is different. The human body adapts to the conditions that are most common. The folks that had a more flexible foot probably go barefoot more often. Some may even play the game of picking up marbles and such.

That sounds very reasonable Goblin. The people with more flexible feet probably do activities to keep their feet flexible.

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