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Beckys_Mom

Prosthetic leg for an elephant

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Posted (edited)

I was watching an Australian wild life programme last week, and it showed an elephant who had stepped on to a land mine and her leg blown off...What these doctors have done is amazing..

I am posting this because I never knew they did prosthetic legs for animals, so this came of a late surprise for me and I thought it was amazing..I couldn't find the Australian documentary show but I managed to find similar on the same subject.

This one is good too...a new leg for the baby elephant

[media=]

They have to keep adjusting the leg as the elephant grows... Amazing things they can do for animal theses days...

Edited by Beckys_Mom
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Hopefully they can do the same for horses now.

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Hopefully they can do the same for horses now.

Well................I think they have, watch the following clip...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Vx6gSkdox0

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I didn't know Thai and Burmese used thousands of elephants in logging camps who then go and step on land mines. This would have been a beautiful story if it wasn't in response to using an endangered species for the logging industry.

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They can do the same for most animals if you have the money.

Glad they could help the poor elephant.

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the mines shouldn't have been there in the first place ... logging with elephants is an age old practice and is less destructive to the jungle rainforest

the elephants are well cared for and forms lifelong companionship with their mahouts ... lifelong ... and I really do mean lifelong ....

~

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It's a shame to see these elephants hobbling around. I'm glad there is something being done to help them.

Here's another one from a few years back, "Mosha" another landmine case.

http://www.unexplain... +leg +elephant

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the mines shouldn't have been there in the first place ... logging with elephants is an age old practice and is less destructive to the jungle rainforest

the elephants are well cared for and forms lifelong companionship with their mahouts ... lifelong ... and I really do mean lifelong ....

~

I can see evidence of what you're saying in the videos, that they'd do this for elephants no longer able to be used for logging, even 10 years after their retirement. It's apparently a tradition 200 years long and like many animals that serve utilitarian purposes, bonds with humans will develop. That might be enough to justify it for some.

If deforestation is the removal of forest, how can there be less destruction to a forest when the forest no longer exists? Deforestation is a major environmental issue for Thailand too. Globally, mankind has destroyed 50% of the world's forests since 1947. I think the real elephant in the room is deforestation of which abused elephants and legless elephants are but a small symptom of an infinitely greater problem.

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Posted (edited)

It's a shame to see these elephants hobbling around. I'm glad there is something being done to help them.

Here's another one from a few years back, "Mosha" another landmine case.

http://www.unexplain... +leg +elephant

Thanks for that...The elephant I first saw recently on the Australian documentary ( like animal hospital )..she looked different from the elephant shown on the you tube clip, and I think she is now 48 years old... The baby elephant was only 7 weeks or 7 months old ( can't recall if it were months or weeks ) when she too got caught in the boarder where land mines are..Her mother had only a few injuries but nothing serious, her baby however had to get proper medical help and care for quite some time... In saying that, she is doing well and seems happy ...

I always knew about land mines, I used to see children who had their limbs blown off after playing in a field that had land mines in them.. But, I had never thought about animals until recently watching the documentary..

Those land mines should not be there, I don't think I will ever understand why they have them ..?

Man will never ever stop trying to destroy this planet and the nature within...I am glad that we have others who do care and will do all to help.

Edited by Beckys_Mom
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I can see evidence of what you're saying in the videos, that they'd do this for elephants no longer able to be used for logging, even 10 years after their retirement. It's apparently a tradition 200 years long and like many animals that serve utilitarian purposes, bonds with humans will develop. That might be enough to justify it for some.

If deforestation is the removal of forest, how can there be less destruction to a forest when the forest no longer exists? Deforestation is a major environmental issue for Thailand too. Globally, mankind has destroyed 50% of the world's forests since 1947. I think the real elephant in the room is deforestation of which abused elephants and legless elephants are but a small symptom of an infinitely greater problem.

Much more than the 200 years that these modern researchers tends to want you to think ... logging has been done as such since the kingdom periods way back when.

It is less destructive to the rainforests because no more than necessary of the forests need to be destroyed for roads and 'infrastructure' Something the modern logging consortium doesn't want to talk about , and the elephants can get in and bring out the logs with little to no damage to the existing eco system.

Mostly they are used to drag the lumber to the nearest river and floated anyways, but the big money wigs can't get in on the big bucks with this reliance on the elephants.

They just fuming and stomping like spoiled brats claiming animal abuse and 'unfair practices' because they can't monopolize the profits.

~

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Much more than the 200 years that these modern researchers tends to want you to think ... logging has been done as such since the kingdom periods way back when.

It is less destructive to the rainforests because no more than necessary of the forests need to be destroyed for roads and 'infrastructure' Something the modern logging consortium doesn't want to talk about , and the elephants can get in and bring out the logs with little to no damage to the existing eco system.

Mostly they are used to drag the lumber to the nearest river and floated anyways, but the big money wigs can't get in on the big bucks with this reliance on the elephants.

They just fuming and stomping like spoiled brats claiming animal abuse and 'unfair practices' because they can't monopolize the profits.

~

I respectfully disagree. The ecosystem that is a forest requires trees, not logs. And whatever no more than necessary means is based entirely on the opinion of someone with other interests besides leaving the forest there.

800px-Chiang_mai_province_road_1263.jpg

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I respectfully disagree. The ecosystem that is a forest requires trees, not logs. And whatever no more than necessary means is based entirely on the opinion of someone with other interests besides leaving the forest there.

~image snip

You don't even know your forebears and allies, these people has been revering and caring for the 'eco system' for generations since time immemorial and way before there were 'civilizations' to thumb your nose at. All cultures have such distinct groups of people that knows the ways of nature ... you mistakenly group all in the same pot of capitalistic industrial greed. Humans needs nature as much as nature is a blessing to nature, it all depends on where and how the forests are cared for.

In Europe and the American continent there used to be such people of nature but now sadly it seems they are all extinct along with the forests over there.

We knows of the nature and what nature means still thankfully ... and with respect humans and nature can and should co exist naturally.

Grand Shrine at Ise

reborn every 20 years in the sacred wood

photography by Yasunobu Kobayahi & Kazuhiko Suzuki / text by Kumi Nanri

On the east side of the Kii Penninsula, near the forests of Kumano, lies Ise Jingu, known popularly by the honorific O-Ise-san. Unique to this shrine, situated in a solemn sacred forest, is the ceremony that takes place every 20 years to rebuild the wooden sanctum in a new location. Historically, the ritual began in the sacred woods with the cutting of trees to be used as lumber for the new shrine.

link

Forests of Japan's Holy Heartland

Sacred trees that framed a culture

photography by Yasunobu Kobayashi

Two-thirds of Japan is forested, but throughout the archipelago, from the subarctic to the subtropical zones, virgin forest accounts for only 1 percent of the trees. One could say that the basis of Japan's culture and spirituality lies in these forests. The deep woods—sacred places into which men did not lightly tread—evoked reverence and stirred the imagination. As if it were embedded in our DNA, awe of sacred trees still dwells in the hearts of modern Japanese.

link

The 10 most exquisite sacred forests in Japan

From the myriad sacred forests throughout Japan, we have selected the 10 most representative of the archipelago's natural regions. These woodlands serve not only as objects of worship but also as precious places where people can purify their souls and refresh their spirits. Each presents a uniquely different habitat of flora and fauna.

link

I'll post links to the other sacred forests all over Asia but it is not recognised enough as such and as such there are no resources on the net. Maybe you might want to go and get the funding to protect them ?

Beyond the Sacred Forest: Complicating Conservation in Southeast Asia

Reflecting new thinking about conservation in Southeast Asia, Beyond the Sacred Forest is the product of a unique collaboration involving ethnographic research in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Scholars from those countries and the United States rethink the translation of environmental concepts between East and West, particularly ideas of nature and culture; what conservation might mean; and how conservation policy is applied and transformed in the everyday landscapes of Southeast Asia. As this collection of essays demonstrates, the researchers focus more on folk, community, and vernacular conservation discourses than on those of institutions and the state.

link

They reject the notion that conservation only takes place in bounded, static, otherworldly spaces such as protected areas or sacred forests. Thick with ethnographic detail, their essays move beyond the forest to agriculture and other land uses, leave behind orthodox notions of the sacred, discard outdated ideas of environmental harmony and stasis, and reject views of the environment that seek to avoid or escape politics. Natural-resource managers and policymakers who work with this more complicated vision of nature and culture are likely to enjoy more enduring success than those who simply seek to remove the influence and impact of humans from conserved landscapes.

link

Amazon link

945083_10152859178625475_29172122_n.jpg

~

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You don't even know your forebears and allies, these people has been revering and caring for the 'eco system' for generations since time immemorial and way before there were 'civilizations' to thumb your nose at. All cultures have such distinct groups of people that knows the ways of nature ... you mistakenly group all in the same pot of capitalistic industrial greed. Humans needs nature as much as nature is a blessing to nature, it all depends on where and how the forests are cared for.

Nature is disappearing. We can't argue with the empirical evidence.

I agree it depends ultimately on how the forests are cared for, the prerequisite for this to be possible is that the forests are maintained. If people can't better pace themselves with their deforestation without getting slowed down by using elephants, that's no excuse. They should do that anyway. As valued as tradition and culture may be, we should learn to respect the natures of wild animals and let them live normal lives. Capturing elephants and selling them into slavery just because some of them happen to be well treated is "normal" to the culture who engages in that practice, it's not normal for the elephant. Habitat destruction is a practice hundreds of years old too and wrapping it up like it's somehow sacred doesn't justify the destruction or the extinction that results.

Animals encroaching on human populations (which is actually humans encroaching on animal populations) is a hazard especially for large animals like elephants. They're going to be trampling and eating crops and destroying property and threatening or even killing people and they're going to get killed for it. We can't take the elephant to work all day and let it out at night to destroy the neighbor's yard. There is no room for middle ground. It's either let wildlife be or seek to control it utterly.

"If a man aspires towards a righteous life, his first act of abstinence is from injury to animals." - Albert Einstein

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Nature is disappearing. We can't argue with the empirical evidence.

I agree it depends ultimately on how the forests are cared for, the prerequisite for this to be possible is that the forests are maintained. If people can't better pace themselves with their deforestation without getting slowed down by using elephants, that's no excuse. They should do that anyway. As valued as tradition and culture may be, we should learn to respect the natures of wild animals and let them live normal lives. Capturing elephants and selling them into slavery just because some of them happen to be well treated is "normal" to the culture who engages in that practice, it's not normal for the elephant. Habitat destruction is a practice hundreds of years old too and wrapping it up like it's somehow sacred doesn't justify the destruction or the extinction that results.

Animals encroaching on human populations (which is actually humans encroaching on animal populations) is a hazard especially for large animals like elephants. They're going to be trampling and eating crops and destroying property and threatening or even killing people and they're going to get killed for it. We can't take the elephant to work all day and let it out at night to destroy the neighbor's yard. There is no room for middle ground. It's either let wildlife be or seek to control it utterly.

"If a man aspires towards a righteous life, his first act of abstinence is from injury to animals." - Albert Einstein

THat my dear friend ... is what is harming both nature and humanity in every way every day every where ....

Extremism in every shade, tone, tint and shape is destructive in the long run.

486653_10152813301835475_1403631837_n.jpg

~

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Posted (edited)

THat my dear friend ... is what is harming both nature and humanity in every way every day every where ....

Extremism in every shade, tone, tint and shape is destructive in the long run.

Human interests are being met every day in every way. It's nature that's being wiped off the map. Appealing to the inheritance of culture or tradition, or finding instances where human interests are blended together with animals because the animal provides some sort of utility to the human doesn't give us room to deny the trend or hide the evidence. The reality is the epitome of extremism. I'm acknowledging it, not justifying it. You're ignoring it my friend. I'm forward looking on this issue and the future isn't looking good. Per your picture above, I slam the door on the past, I don't leave it open to justify the present.

we-do-not-inherit-the-earth-from-our-ancestors.jpg

Edited by Yamato

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Human interests are being met every day in every way. It's nature that's being wiped off the map. Finding instances where they're harmoniously blended together because the animal provides some sort of utility for the human doesn't give us room to deny the trend or hide the evidence. The reality is the epitome of extremism.

~image repeat snip

"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” ~Aldo Leopold

"The insufferable arrogance of human beings to think that Nature was made solely for their benefit, as if it was conceivable that the sun had been set afire merely to ripen men's apples and head their cabbages." ~Savinien de Cyrano de Bergerac, États et empires de la lune, 1656

"It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment.”

~Ansel Adams

"You must teach your children that the ground beneath their feet is the ashes of your Grandfathers.

So that they respect the land, tell your children that the earth is rich with the lives of our kin.

Teach your children what we have taught our children, that the Earth is our Mother.

Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.

If men spit upon the ground, they spit upon themselves.”

Native American Wisdom

link

we not only know of the ancient wisdom my friend ... we never forgot ...

432156_10152852253190475_304043359_n.jpg

'receive' sayeth master Tagore ... receive ....

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You should be able to view this in Malaysia:

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You should be able to view this in Malaysia:

~media snip

we try to keep the politic heads out of the eco circles ... but its not always possible ... here in Malaysia its not the laws or even the big shot industrials as we are basically agro based .... the people is the problem ... thankfully it is just a small slice but as you well know ... one small barrel spoils a whole river ....

laws wont protect nature proper ... by the time laws are invoked it usually is too late ...

its a minds and mental war my friend ... and as such it can only be won by hearts and love ...

429827_10152851362565475_2117036661_n.jpg

teach loving of nature ... with respect to respect ... my friend ... :yes:

then kindness will ensue eternally ....

~

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Speaking of mixing human laws up with nature, you'll like this...

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Speaking of mixing human laws up with nature, you'll like this...

~media repeat snip

wow ... that's a rush from the past ...

thankies :tu::nw:

`

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