Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4
Ashotep

Edward Snowden NSA whistleblower

325 posts in this topic

His options are a bit bleak,It's a life on the run looking over his shoulder or left to rot in a federal Jail for the rest of his life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pray that Snowden can get away from the clutches of the NSA. I think the guy is a hero for what he did. I think Babe Ruth will call me a hypocrite over this one. I am all for Bradley Manning being convicted and serving jail time for his WikiLeaks crime. The difference for me...the WHOLE difference is the positions held by the individuals. Snowden is a civilian employee of the government and while he probably took an oath, he did not wear the uniform. When US Army or other service members can decide on their own to go outside the chain of command and break secrecy against direct orders then they endanger our country - something they are sworn NOT to do.

Some oaths should be broken. The Mafia has omerta to hide their crimes, and it looks like some alphabet agencies do too.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lawmakers are wanting him extradited and prosecuted. He seems to have dropped from sight in Hong Kong.

http://www.rawstory....t-in-hong-kong/

The old labels of "Left" and "Right" are fading in this case. The Establishment Republicans join the Democratic statists in their calls for his prosecution. Libertarians of all types laud him. This is the emergence of a new paradigm.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

This man is very brave, indeed. His family and loved ones may be targeted because of his actions.

He needs to flee the country to a place where extradition is difficult before he's disappeared.

Edited by Kafkaesque
4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He said that he didn't do it for others, he did it for himself. He doesn't want to live in the world we're finding ourselves in and sacrificed his career, and possibly freedom, to try and change it.

And if our country is to survive as even a ghost of what it was intended to be then we all will have to answer a similar question in our own lives someday....maybe someday very soon.
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really good article, and video here: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/power-players-abc-news/chill-factor-investigative-reporter-talks-us-covert-wars-112605856.html?vp=1

The Chill Factor: Investigative Reporter Talks US Covert Wars and National Secrets

Top Line

As the White House faces questions about secret internet and telephone surveillance programs, investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill says, “There's a chill that's been sent through the national security reporting community.”

Scahill, who investigated the United States’ covert operations in the war against terrorism in a new documentary, “Dirty Wars,” told Top Line in an interview recorded prior to the most recent NSA leaks that sources inside the government have grown fearful of talking to the media.

“Many sources that I used to be able to talk to through encrypted e-mail or with chats using OTR, off the record software, they won't do it anymore,” Scahill said. “It's either in person or nothing. … There's a real fear on the part of whistleblowers and sources that the Espionage Act is going to come knocking on their door one day under the Noble Peace Prize-winning, Constitutional law professor, Democratic president.”

In his documentary, Scahill makes the case that the Obama administration has overstepped its stated goals of “targeted killings” of terrorists in places like Yemen, Pakistan and Somalia.

Asked if he thinks the U.S. is creating more terrorists than it is killing, Scahill responded: “I think we're creating more enemies than we are killing terrorists. When I was in Yemen, people were saying, 'You consider al Qaeda terrorism. We consider the drones terrorism.'”

He told the story of investigating the United States’ first authorized attack in Yemen, which occurred in 2009.

“When I went there to investigate this cruise missile strike, multiple people had cell phone videos of the aftermath,” Scahill recalled. “And the U.S. had claimed that they had wiped out an al Qaeda camp, but their cell phone videos showed bodies of infants being pulled out of rubble, giving lie to the pronouncements that it was just an al Qaeda camp that was hit and civilians didn't die in it.”

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Babe, what Manning did was just dump hundreds of thousands of misc files a few ended up being illegal while the vast majority where just classified. He didn't care what he got just that he got it. Had he just leaked the illegal stuff, such as the Apache Video or others, then my opinion would be different but based on the fact that those items just happened to be in the data dump, and not the sole reason for it, then he broke Military Law and betrayed his Oath.

What Snowden did was leak a single piece of information. About something that the Government did in secret against the laws of the land, and as I understand it, the highest law of the land in the US is the US Constitution.

The only similarities as that they leaked government information. The biggest difference is the information leaked. That information leaked is what defines these two cases. Manning deserves a maximum penalty for betraying his position in the Military. Where as Snowden leaked information that the public needed to know as the Government is taking private information and holding it in an Intelligent Service database.

~Thanato

I do understand what you're saying, and in the most general sense, your details are essentially true.

But I would say your interpretation of the details is way off base. Manning did not release the information to the enemy (whoever on earth that might be), he released it to the public, including the people who pay his checks, the american taxpayers.

Further, while he did betray his government, he defended and greatly served his country. In reality, a country and its government are 2 separate things. As Thomas Paine put it, it is the responsibility of the patriot to protect his country from its government.

Manning and Snowden did precisely that.

It is a mistake to confuse a country and its government. :yes:

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do understand what you're saying, and in the most general sense, your details are essentially true.

But I would say your interpretation of the details is way off base. Manning did not release the information to the enemy (whoever on earth that might be), he released it to the public, including the people who pay his checks, the american taxpayers.

Further, while he did betray his government, he defended and greatly served his country. In reality, a country and its government are 2 separate things. As Thomas Paine put it, it is the responsibility of the patriot to protect his country from its government.

Manning and Snowden did precisely that.

It is a mistake to confuse a country and its government. :yes:

I like what Jesse Ventura says. "I love my country, not my government." :tsu:

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Journalist in US surveillance case: More to come

HONG KONG (AP) — The journalist who exposed classified U.S. surveillance programs leaked by an American defense contractor said Tuesday that there will be more 'significant revelations' to come from the documents.

"We are going to have a lot more significant revelations that have not yet been heard over the next several weeks and months," said Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian.

Greenwald told The Associated Press the decision was being made on when to release the next story based on the information provided by Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old employee of government contractor Booz Allen Hamilton who has been accused by U.S. Senate intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California of committing an "act of treason" that should be prosecuted.

Greenwald's reports last week exposed widespread U.S. government programs to collect telephone and Internet records.

"There are dozens of stories generated by the documents he provided, and we intend to pursue every last one of them," Greenwald said.

Taken from http://news.yahoo.com/journalist-us-surveillance-case-more-come-050921834.html

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But you are missing my point. With out any regard for the boots on the ground, he just gave over 500,000 files to a foreign national. He betrayed his oath, he betrayed his position, and he betrayed his nation. You can allways play the what if game after it happens, but what the man did was illegal. Yes some good came out of it, but the good should never out weigh the bad.

Snowden knew something that was under the laws of the land (the US Constitution) illegal. So he sought to bring to light information on this classified operation to spy on US Nationals.

I completely recognised your point. What I'm saying is that maybe if he did filter out those other documents we may have never seen the injustice that was exposed. Most of those classified documents are nothings anyway.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are people like Snowden becoming the modern day Robin Hood? Instead of robbing from the rich and giving it to the poor they are exposing governments or the rich and powerful for what they are doing secretly.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The petition has reached 50,000 signatures!!

Link: https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/pardon-edward-snowden/Dp03vGYD

Also this:

Americans Debate: Is Edward Snowden a Hero or a Traitor?

Meanwhile in the U.S., a debate is raging as to whether Snowden should be considered a hero or a threat to the nation.

"He's a traitor," Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, told ABC News' "Good Morning America" in an exclusive interview today. "The disclosure of this information puts Americans at risk, it shows our adversaries what our capabilities are, and it's a giant violation of the law."

Boehner said he had been briefed on all of the programs revealed by Snowden's information and said that no Americans are spied on unless they're in contact with a terrorist abroad.

Greenwald called Boehner's remarks "pathetic."

"Nothing [snowden's] disclosed in any way harms national security. Everything has been carefully vetted first by him and then by us, to make sure that there was no harm to anybody. It was only informing our fellow citizens about what it is our government is doing in the dark," he said. "We didn't reveal anything to terrorists."

But at the White House website, more than 25,000 people have signed a petition to give Snowden a blanket pardon for his alleged crimes.

There was also great praise for Snowden from another famed whistleblower, Daniel Ellsberg, who defied the Nixon administration four decades ago by leaking the Pentagon Papers about the Vietnam War.

"As for being a traitor, that's part of the price of telling the truth that the President doesn't want told," Ellsberg, now 82 years old, told ABC News. "I paid that price myself."

Taken from: http://gma.yahoo.com/u-prepares-charges-against-alleged-nsa-leaker-sources-112656748--abc-news-topstories.html

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boehner is such an idiot, but he does show the government mindset, no doubt.

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boehner is such an idiot, but he does show the government mindset, no doubt.

Just shows that the Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats..... :no:

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both Sides Can Agree: America's Top Spy Lied About Data Mining

Public officials are rarely called liars these days, even when they lie blatantly, but the ideological odd couple of Slate's Fred Kaplan and Charles Cooke of the National Review are both using that word to call out Director of National Intelligence James Clapper for deceiving the public about the extent of the NSA's data gathering. Only Kaplan calls for Clapper's job — though others are not far behind — but the implication in both writers is clear: If you're going to be Director of National Intelligence, you should at least have a better poker face.

It all goes back to an exchange at a Senate hearing back on March 12 when Sen. Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, asked Clapper (the man charged with overseeing America's entire national security apparatus) straight up, under oath, "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Clapper said, "No sir … not wittingly."

After Edward Snowden's leak, Cooke writes, "By dint of a widespread preference for politeness, human beings tend to trip over themselves to find euphemisms for the word 'lying.'" And as Kaplan writes, "we all now know, he was lying. We also now know that Clapper knew he was lying." Even more galling, as Kaplan points out, is that this was a question that Wyden already knew the answer to and Clapper knew that Wyden knew the answer was "Yes." But he said "No" anyway, because, as Clapper explained last weekend, he wanted to give an answer that was the "least untruthful." That's a parsing of language only Bill Clinton or Stephen Colbert could love

From: http://news.yahoo.com/both-sides-agree-americas-top-spy-lied-data-185223217.html

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3ut3ee.jpg
4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

This is too funny:

George Orwell's dystopian fiction Nineteen Eighty-Four is enjoying a renaissance. According to the lastest sales rankings published by Amazon.com, sales of the classic novel's 2003 reprint have spiked 3,100% over the past 24 hours as coverage has widened of the fresh reports (and new confusion) about the National Security Agency's data gathering programs and the 29-year-old Booz Allen Hamilton ex-employee,Edward Snowden, who leaked details about them last week. Amazon's "movers and shakers" feature, which tracks such data, changes fairly often, so we're including a screenshot of the page taken on Tuesday afternoon

From: http://www.theatlant...0-amazon/66129/

Edited by Kowalski
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard 1984 was a really good book.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I do understand what you're saying, and in the most general sense, your details are essentially true.

But I would say your interpretation of the details is way off base. Manning did not release the information to the enemy (whoever on earth that might be), he released it to the public, including the people who pay his checks, the american taxpayers.

*snip*

Edward Snowden Tells South China Morning Post: U.S. Has Been Hacking Hong Kong And China Since 2009

Snowden said that according to unverified documents seen by the Post, the NSA had been hacking computers in Hong Kong and on the mainland since 2009. None of the documents revealed any information about Chinese military systems, he said ... Snowden believed there had been more than 61,000 NSA hacking operations globally, with hundreds of targets in Hong Kong and on the mainland.

http://www.huffingto..._n_3430082.html

So he runs to a country that has their internet and phone monitored? Is he planning on staying there? Are they really more free than we are?

Then he tells them our government has been spying on theirs?

And we are still claiming he did this for the American people? Unsure how raising tensions, or attempting to, between us and China is good for our people. Unsure how telling them that is not giving information to our competitors.

Snowden is a megalomaniac.

Edited by The world needs you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This guy use to make 200k and he now gives it all up to tell the truth.

This is a brave person we should all be proud of. Thank god some people still have courage

He was also only on the job for less than 3 months.

Booz Allen can confirm that Edward Snowden, 29, was an employee of our firm for less than 3 months, assigned to a team in Hawaii. Snowden, who had a salary at the rate of $122,000, was terminated June 10, 2013 for violations of the firm’s code of ethics and firm policy. News reports that this individual has claimed to have leaked classified information are shocking, and if accurate, this action represents a grave violation of the code of conduct and core values of our firm. We will work closely with our clients and authorities in their investigation of this matter.

Snowden claimed he made roughly $200,000, according to The Guardian.

Edward Snowden Fired By Booz Allen; Whistleblower Made Only $122,000

He definitely knows how to overinflate himself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

David Brooks offers another angle on Edward Snowden, a portrait of someone cut off from the world, his neighbors, his family, and his employers.

From what we know so far, Edward Snowden appears to be the ultimate unmediated man. Though obviously terrifically bright, he could not successfully work his way through the institution of high school. Then he failed to navigate his way through community college.

According to The Washington Post, he has not been a regular presence around his mother’s house for years. When a neighbor in Hawaii tried to introduce himself, Snowden cut him off and made it clear he wanted no neighborly relationships. He went to work for Booz Allen Hamilton and the C.I.A., but he has separated himself from them, too.

Though thoughtful, morally engaged and deeply committed to his beliefs, he appears to be a product of one of the more unfortunate trends of the age: the atomization of society, the loosening of social bonds, the apparently growing share of young men in their 20s who are living technological existences in the fuzzy land between their childhood institutions and adult family commitments.

If you live a life unshaped by the mediating institutions of civil society, perhaps it makes sense to see the world a certain way: Life is not embedded in a series of gently gradated authoritative structures: family, neighborhood, religious group, state, nation and world. Instead, it’s just the solitary naked individual and the gigantic and menacing state.

This lens makes you more likely to share the distinct strands of libertarianism that are blossoming in this fragmenting age: the deep suspicion of authority, the strong belief that hierarchies and organizations are suspect, the fervent devotion to transparency, the assumption that individual preference should be supreme. You’re more likely to donate to the Ron Paul for president campaign, as Snowden did.

It’s logical, given this background and mind-set, that Snowden would sacrifice his career to expose data mining procedures of the National Security Agency. Even if he has not been able to point to any specific abuses, he was bound to be horrified by the confidentiality endemic to military and intelligence activities. And, of course, he’s right that the procedures he’s unveiled could lend themselves to abuse in the future.

But Big Brother is not the only danger facing the country. Another is the rising tide of distrust, the corrosive spread of cynicism, the fraying of the social fabric and the rise of people who are so individualistic in their outlook that they have no real understanding of how to knit others together and look after the common good.

This is not a danger Snowden is addressing. In fact, he is making everything worse.

For society to function well, there have to be basic levels of trust and cooperation, a respect for institutions and deference to common procedures. By deciding to unilaterally leak secret N.S.A. documents, Snowden has betrayed all of these things.

He betrayed honesty and integrity, the foundation of all cooperative activity. He made explicit and implicit oaths to respect the secrecy of the information with which he was entrusted. He betrayed his oaths.

He betrayed his friends. Anybody who worked with him will be suspect. Young people in positions like that will no longer be trusted with responsibility for fear that they will turn into another Snowden.

He betrayed his employers. Booz Allen and the C.I.A. took a high-school dropout and offered him positions with lavish salaries. He is violating the honor codes of all those who enabled him to rise.

He betrayed the cause of open government. Every time there is a leak like this, the powers that be close the circle of trust a little tighter. They limit debate a little more.

He betrayed the privacy of us all. If federal security agencies can’t do vast data sweeps, they will inevitably revert to the older, more intrusive eavesdropping methods.

He betrayed the Constitution. The founders did not create the United States so that some solitary 29-year-old could make unilateral decisions about what should be exposed. Snowden self-indulgently short-circuited the democratic structures of accountability, putting his own preferences above everything else.

*snip*

The Solitary Leaker by David Brooks

Edited by The world needs you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Edward Snowden appears to have been a recluse living in fantasyland. Unable to see or tell the truth in the most minor of ways. Not the most credible source one could choose to place the stock of trust in.

(Reuters) - Long before he became known worldwide as the NSA contractor who exposed top-secret U.S. government surveillance programs, Edward Snowden worked for a Japanese anime company run by friends and went by the nicknames "The True HOOHA" and "Phish."In 2002, he was 18 years old, a high-school dropout and his parents had just divorced. On the tiny anime company's website, he wrote of his skills with video games and popularity with women.

As an adult, the former CIA employee has not left much of a digital trail on the Internet. Snowden, who turns 30 later this month, does not appear to be active on social media sites like Facebook or Twitter - at least not under his own name.

But the website of Ryuhana Press, a now defunct start-up that had sold anime art, offers a glimpse of Snowden as a youth. As its web editor, Snowden's profile page is a mix of truth, sarcasm and silly jokes.

For example, he listed his correct birthday - June 21, 1983 - and noted that it falls on the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year. But he also claimed to be 37 years old and to have fathered two preteen children.

"I really am a nice guy," Snowden wrote on his profile page. "You see, I act arrogant and cruel because I was not hugged enough as a child, and because the public education system turned it's (sic) wretched, spiked back on me."

*snip*

Photographs uploaded by friends for Snowden's 19th birthday show a young man pulling down his pants for his colleagues, putting a clothespin on his chest, and dancing. A blog entry from a company employee teased, "Who is he? What does he do? Does he really love himself as much as his shameless marketing would have you believe?"

Snowden wrote on his profile that he liked online role-playing games (RPG). "I always wanted to write RPG campaigns with my spare time, but I'll get about three missions in and scrap the world for my next, better, powergamin' build."

He joked that he "got bullied" into being an editor on the website by a gaggle of artists and "beautiful nubile young girls."

Snowden said he liked playing the popular fighting video game Tekken. He was so skilled that he attracted a gathering of fans at the 2002 Anime USA convention, wrote a co-worker on another part of the site. "He tends to spontaneously be a ray of sunshine and inspiration. He's a great listener, and he's eager to help people improve themselves."

*snip*

http://www.reuters.c...E95B14B20130612

The above link has an avatar Snowden used in the past. The avatar has a shirt that seems to say: I <3 Me.

2woh9fs.jpg

Edited by The world needs you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This guy will be satan incarnate before the press and government hacks finish with him. But it won't matter at all. He could be a pink unicorn and it wouldn't change the facts he made public. I hope tptb slow roast on this one!

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Could Snowden be a Chinese plant? That is on theory that was loosely put forward by a former M16 operative, Matthew Dunn. Keep in mind this is just speculation on Mr. Dunn's part and not a conspiracy theory.

Also revealed are Snowden's failed bid to join a U.S. Special Forces unit, his actual positions at the CIA and NSA.

*snip*

What do we know about Snowden? He's 29 years old, studied computing in college but failed to complete his courses, underwent training and selection for U.S. Special Forces but was medically discharged after he broke both legs, applied to the NSA and was given a job as a security guard, applied to the CIA and was tasked on IT security, left the Agency in 2009 to take up a more lucrative job with consulting giant Booz Allen Hamilton where he was seconded as a computer specialist to the NSA, contacted Britain's Guardian newspaper and told two journalists all about Prism, and fled to Hong Kong because in his words the Chinese city has "a spirited commitment to free speech and the right of political dissent." During his interviews with Guardian journalists, Snowden said, "I don't want to live in a society that does these sort of things. I do not want to live in a world where everything I do and say is recorded." He added that he had an "obligation to help free people from oppression", and instructed the Guardian to release his identity. He concluded that he knew he'd never see his loved ones again. Snowden's now gone missing, though is believed to still be in Hong Kong.

When I look at the above reported brief facts, there are many questions and possibilities that nag me. His career progression suggests to me that it is possible he is a quitter, has macho aspirations that are at odds with his somewhat more mundane skills as a computer technician, and that after his discharge from the army he tried to fuel these aspirations in the NSA and CIA, only to find out that both agencies were only willing to employ him in jobs that were nothing like those of Jason Bourne. It is probable that bred resentment within him toward not only his immediate employers, but also the broader United States special operations and intelligence community that he wished to be part of. At some point he probably came to the conclusion, "They don't want me; so I don't want them." If accurate, that means his declaration that he blew the lid on Prism for the good of American people is actually a smokescreen to hide a self-centered grievance.

Like other public sector workers who walk away from their government jobs with chips on their shoulders, it is also possible that Snowden exchanged his loyalty to the state with loyalty to cash. It's reported that his job at Booz Allen Hamilton earned him a very lucrative salary that was no doubt significantly higher than he received in IT and security at the CIA and NSA. But if that's true, why would he throw that away in favor of telling the truth about Prism? Perhaps I'm wrong and Snowden really is a crusader with a cause. Maybe, but there are more red flags.

*snip*

It doesn't add up that Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the NSA's Prism program solely because he is a selfless moral crusader. And it only partly adds up that Snowden is an aggrieved traitor who rashly threw away his lucrative job and went on the run in China.

There is a third possibility that could make sense:

Against a backdrop of scathing U.S criticism of China's cyber attacks against America, China decided to hit back at America with an clever tactic: credibly expose American espionage activities that undermine the constitutional rights of American citizens, and thereby get America to tear apart the NSA to the extent the agency's future capabilities will be diminished. Edward Snowden was profiled by Chinese intelligence agencies while he was working at Booz Allen. The Chinese assessed that he had grievances against the U.S. state and was also financially motivated. They recruited him using cash. The deal was he had to whistle blow the Prism program by talking to the reputable Guardian newspaper. He also had to reveal his identity to further his credibility. In return he'd be given a comfortable life in China. Any U.S. attempts to extradite Snowden would be blocked by Beijing.

Like all theories, time and further information will prove whether it's right, partially right, or wrong. But if I am right, that means Snowden is just a pawn, and China has put America in checkmate.

What Don't We Know About Edward Snowden?

Keep in mind what is above in purple is a theory and nothing more at this time. It is not being presented as fact.

What we do know for fact is that he left his family and girlfriend on the lurch and then lied to his employer as a reason to not go to work for a couple of days...

...keep in mind in the job he was in if he planned to go overseas he has to report it before he goes if the country (12 FAM 264.2 and 276), if anyone overseas tries to ask him any questions that seem suspicious he has to report it (12 Fam 274.2 and see: Foreign Influence: Noteworthy Events During Travel: Foreign Contacts), and going missing for a few days if unexplained would might also be looked into.

The following article questions if he worked alone in betraying our government.

Also in blue font below are questions on how he got the leaked FISA document when someone in his position would not be privy to such. Need to know basis and all...

Federal investigators looking into claims made by alleged NSA leaker Edward Snowden are not totally convinced that Snowden worked alone to reveal secret NSA surveillance programs, a senior law enforcement source told ABC News today.

“The FBI is not 100 percent focused on this one guy,” the source said. “Agents are not just guided by what he claims.”

Before Snowden stepped from the shadows to claim he was the source of a series of headline-grabbing reports in the U.K.’s The Guardian newspaper and in The Washington Post, the columnist who broke the stories for The Guardian, Glenn Greenwald, told ABC News’ “This Week” that he was “not going to confirm there is only one individual – there could be more than one.”

Since Snowden’s public confession late Sunday, neither Greenwald nor the other reporters involved in the stories have mentioned a second source, but investigators noted that in his confession, Snowden never explicitly stated which documents he handed over to the newspapers.

National security veterans said they’re skeptical, for example, that Snowden, a private information technology contractor working for the NSA in Hawaii, could have had access to a Top Secret order from the super-secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) court. That order, which compelled Verizon to hand over phone call information on millions of its customers to the government, was the basis of Greenwald’s first report late last week.

“It makes no sense to me,” a former U.S. counterintelligence official said. According to insiders, there has never been such a breach of the FISA court in all of its 35-year existence.

The law enforcement source also said that the FBI was on Snowden’s trail as a possible leaker well before he revealed himself online, as first reported by The Daily Beast.

“There were indications he was involved before that,” the source said.

According to The Guardian, which revealed Snowden’s identity in a video and print interview, Snowden told his NSA supervisor three weeks ago that he had to be away from work for “a couple of weeks” to get treatment for epilepsy, which he said had revealed itself in seizures last year. He also told his girlfriend he would be away for a few weeks and gave no explanation.

“That is not an uncommon occurrence for someone who has spent the last decade working in the intelligence world,” he told the paper.

*snip*

Did Alleged NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Work Alone?

Edited by The world needs you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.