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RayGday

The Pyramid and the Yard

150 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 1000 yards. Exactly as designed.

In 1882, Flinders Petrie measured 1007.7 British Yards.

pyramid-grey.png

1000 yards is 1 second of equatorial rotation.

The ancients divided the day by 12 hours not 24.

earth_clock.jpg

Resulting in 43,200 seconds in a day.

43,200s x 1000y = 43,200,000 yard circumference.

To convert to British yards multiply by 1.0077.

This calculates to a 39,806 km circumference (99.4% of NASA).

The height of the Pyramid is exactly the radius of a 1000 yard circle.

The Pyramid represents the Earth at a scale of 43,200.

The designer of the Great Pyramid knew the exact size and shape of the Earth and its rotational velocity.

This used to be common knowledge.

More details here. http://www.xrayb.com...nd_the_yard.php

Could the base unit of length used by the ancients have been the yard?

What are your thoughts?

Edited by RayGday

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The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 1000 yards. Exactly as designed.

In 1882, Flinders Petrie measured 1007.7 British Yards.

pyramid-grey.png

1000 yards is 1 second of equatorial rotation.

The ancients divided the day by 12 hours not 24.

earth_clock.jpg

Resulting in 43,200 seconds in a day.

43,200s x 1000y = 43,200,000 yard circumference.

To convert to British yards multiply by 1.0077.

This calculates to a 39,806 km circumference (99.4% of NASA).

The height of the Pyramid is exactly the radius of a 1000 yard circle.

The Pyramid represents the Earth at a scale of 43,200.

The designer of the Great Pyramid knew the exact size and shape of the Earth and its rotational velocity.

This used to be common knowledge.

More details here. http://www.xrayb.com...nd_the_yard.php

Could the base unit of length used by the ancients have been the yard?

What are your thoughts?

It’s an interesting theory but I would like to know where you got the 12 hour day part I must admit I haven’t had time to look at your link so the info may well have been in that. As far as the yard being the measurement used I cant see any reason why not perhaps not as we know it or atleast known as something else.

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Posted (edited)

I thought they used a version of the cubit (from middle finger tip to elbow -which on me is right at 19 inches)... Of course, they tended to be shorter back then...

Edited by Taun

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86,400 seconds in a modern day. 24 hours x 60 x 60.

The ancient 360° sky was divided yearly by 12 Moons, Months or Zodiacs and daily by 12 hours.

43,200 secs in the ancient day. 12 hours x 60 x 60.

Hope that helps.

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Huh?

One minute of angle of The Earth's circumference is one nautical mile; one second of angle is closer to 100 feet.

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Huh?

One minute of angle of The Earth's circumference is one nautical mile; one second of angle is closer to 100 feet.

yeh, but we are back to the "pyramid inch"....

It is surprising in how many variation it pops up taking advantage of those who slept through geography class in high school....

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The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 1000 yards. Exactly as designed.

I believe you'll find that the perimeter is more like 1008 yards.

1000 yards is 1 second of equatorial rotation.

Resulting in 43,200 seconds in a day.

43,200s x 1000y = 43,200,000 yard circumference.

To convert to British yards multiply by 1.0077.

Results in 43,532,640 yards

The Earth's circumference, in yards, is 52,626,768.

This calculates to a 39,806 km circumference (99.4% of NASA).

No, more like 83% of the actual circumference.

The height of the Pyramid is exactly the radius of a 1000 yard circle.

Sorry, no.

The height of the GP is 455 ft, or 151.6 yards. Hence, the height of the GP is "exactly" the radius of a 303.2 yard circle.

What are your thoughts?

Perhaps the more pertinent question is, Where are your thoughts?

Harte

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The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 1000 yards. Exactly as designed.

In 1882, Flinders Petrie measured 1007.7 British Yards.

>>Snip<<

1000 yards is 1 second of equatorial rotation.

This discussion might already be stalled but I thought I'd jump in, anyway. Petrie actually measured the pyramid in inches and published his findings in The Pyramids and Temples of Gizeh (1883). The results are as follows (page 39):

North: 9069.4"

East: 9067.7"

South: 9069.5"

West: 9068.6"

I converted these measurements to feet and yards, which provides us with the following:

North: 755.8 ft. / 251.9 yds

East: 755.6 ft. / 251.8 yds

South: 755.8 ft. / 251.9 yds

West: 755.7 ft. / 251.9 yds

Harte can check my math for me because math is admittedly not my strength, but this comes out to be a perimeter of 1007.5 yards. I've never put much stock into "pyramid measuring" (a derogatory term from Petrie's day), but folks can come up with almost any mathematical findings with the Great Pyramid if they look hard enough. The problem comes when one expects things to be precise down to the inch, which nothing constructed in the Early Bronze Age is. Moreover, modern forms of measurement like inches and feet and years are meaningless when looking at it from the ancient perspective because these forms of measurement definitely did not exist. The form of measurement in ancient Egypt was the cubit.

I'll leave it at that. Harte's already dissected the math much abler than I could, anyway. I just hope we don't find ourselves descending into the madness of the "pyramid inch" from the likes of Piazzi Smyth and other dreamy-eyed pretenders from the nineteenth century.

The ancients divided the day by 12 hours not 24.

>>Snip<<

No, they did not. The Egyptians were the first to observe twelve hours of day and twelve hours of night—twenty-four hours, in other words. There is no mistaking this. There are actually tombs where the hours of the day and hours of the night are personified by twenty-four different deities, often goddesses. The Egyptian calendar was divided into twelve months consisting of three seasons, totaling 365 days. There was no leap year, which naturally created calendrical issues. We owe the Babylonians for dividing the hour into sixty minutes, which the Egyptians themselves did not observe.

The Pyramid represents the Earth at a scale of 43,200.

The designer of the Great Pyramid knew the exact size and shape of the Earth and its rotational velocity.

The designer of the Great Pyramid was the great nobleman Hemiunu, and he definitely did not know the size and shape of the Earth. Nor did any other Egyptian at any point in pharaonic history. Nor would any Egyptian have been the least interested in such details. If it didn't concern the borders of Egypt and those immediate neighboring regions from which the Egyptians obtained natural resources and luxury items, they could not have cared less. It is a common fact that the Egyptians viewed foreigners with innate distrust and often plainly as inferior enemies, so they possessed no interest in the wider world. They were not explorers or adventures and did not even care to sail the open ocean, so how would they have known about the exact size and shape of the Earth? No one really understood this with any accuracy, in fact, until the Greeks of the Classical and Hellenistic periods.

Lastly, it's important to note that the zodiac in your graphic is not even of the Egyptian tradition. This has come down to us principally through the Greeks. While the Egyptians did observe some constellations as important, they were more interested in singular heavenly bodies.

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I'll leave it at that. Harte's already dissected the math much abler than I could, anyway. I just hope we don't find ourselves descending into the madness of the "pyramid inch" from the likes of Piazzi Smyth and other dreamy-eyed pretenders from the nineteenth century.

I figured I'd better leave some for you, kmt. LOL

The Egyptians were the first to observe twelve hours of day and twelve hours of night—twenty-four hours, in other words. There is no mistaking this. There are actually tombs where the hours of the day and hours of the night are personified by twenty-four different deities, often goddesses.

This would be a good place to point out that these hours of the AE's weren't all the same length.

The day was divided into 12 hours, as was the night. But the day started at dawn and ended at sunset. Obviously, all days are not the same length. But they divided them into twelve hours (and the nights) anyway.

So, in the winter when days are shorter, this division left the daytime hours shorter than they were in summer. The converse was true for the night time hours.

Harte

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Posted (edited)

...They were not explorers or adventures and did not even care to sail the open ocean...

SC: Seems your opinion is somewhat outdated:

The world’s oldest port has been discovered near the Red Sea town of Zaafarana and, as Nevine El-Aref shows, it reveals that, contrary to common belief, the ancient Egyptians were accomplished sailors. The long-held supposition that the ancient Egyptians avoided travelling by sea and had poor naval technology can be laid to rest. Early this week archaeologists discovered a port dating from the reign of the Fourth Dynasty king Khufu, builder of the Great Pyramid and owner of the Solar Boats at Giza, in the Wadi Al-Jarf area south of Zaafarana on the Red Sea. - Source.

SC

Edited by Scott Creighton

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North: 9069.4"

East: 9067.7"

South: 9069.5"

West: 9068.6"

Add these up to get 36275.2 inches which equates to 1007.64 yards.

In 1925, J. H. Cole measured 1007.71 yards

The Yard that the pyramid builders used and the British Yard that Petrie used are the same yard.

Over time the British Yard changed but it's still very, very close to the original.

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Add these up to get 36275.2 inches which equates to 1007.64 yards.

In 1925, J. H. Cole measured 1007.71 yards

The Yard that the pyramid builders used and the British Yard that Petrie used are the same yard.

Over time the British Yard changed but it's still very, very close to the original.

The yard that the pyramid builders "used" didn't exist. There was no such unit of measurement in Ancient Egypt. There was however the Royal Cubit of 52.4 centimeters/20.63 inches. There was also a short cubit of 44.9 centimeters/17.68 inches. Using the longer of the two, the Royal Cubit, we have the following measurements of the previouis four sides:

North: 9069.4"..................................439.62 Royal cubits

East: 9067.7"...................................439.54 Royal cubits

South: 9069.5".................................439.63 Royal cubits

West: 9068.6"..................................439.58 Royal cubits

and using the shorter we have the following:

North: 9069.4"..................................512.98 short cubits

East: 9067.7"...................................512.88 short cubits

South: 9069.5".................................512.99 short cubits

West: 9068.6"..................................512.93 short cubits

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/measures.htm

cormac

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We owe the Babylonians for dividing the hour into sixty minutes, which the Egyptians themselves did not observe.

OK, I'll bite. What did the Egyptians divide their hour into?

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OK, I'll bite. What did the Egyptians divide their hour into?

I think AE did not divide hour into units as small as a minute, there are no hieroglyphs, to my knowledge, for such a unit. However, it is convenient to divide an hour, so they divided it into quarters. Look at this link. It is a game, and has minutes for our modern minds, but it shows AE dividing into quarters and a hireoglyph for such

http://www.visualfractions.com/egyptcakesancient/egyptcakesancient.html

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There was also a short cubit of 44.9 centimeters/17.68 inches.

The "short" cubit is 18 inches or half a yard. ("a Foot and a half" - Isaac Newton.)

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 2000 cubits or 1000 yards.

http://www.xrayb.com...nd_the_yard.php

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Posted (edited)

The "short" cubit is 18 inches or half a yard. ("a Foot and a half" - Isaac Newton.)

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 2000 cubits or 1000 yards.

http://www.xrayb.com...nd_the_yard.php

And we all eat with our ears, give or take an inch...

Mixing up measuring systems of at least 3 civilizations and a span of 5000 years is certainly not scientific.

The ancient Egyptian cubit changed several times over history and due to external influences, at Pharaohnic times the valid cubit was 7 4 finger palms or 28 digits. That comes to around 52 centimeters or 20.47 inches. Several measuring rods with that measure have been found from that time and no two are exactly alike diverging by several tenths of a centimeter... a good indication that precise reproducibility was an unknown art at the time. That alone drives the whole arc second theory at absurdum.

Edited by questionmark

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Posted (edited)

There was also a short cubit of 44.9

centimeters/ 17.68 inches .

.

The "short" cubit is 18 inches or half

a yard. ("a Foot and a half" - Isaac

Newton.)

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid

is 2000 cubits or 1000 yards.

.

there's a third of an inch difference between 17.68 inches and 18 inches.

multiply that by your 2000 cubit measure and you're left with a discrepancy of 50ft.

from an engineering perspective, that kind of tolerance level is unacceptable.

A.Thom tried this kind of thing when he argued for a 'megalithic yard' for the circle builders of europe. when you're measuring things out with string (as the circle & pyramid builders would've done), different tension levels used by different individuals would produce wildly different results.

a yardstick would've been too impractical.

the builders obviously had some kind of measuring system, you need one to engineer things (ancient theodolite anyone....?), but I don't think your way is the solution OP.

.

*edited for brandy spolling mistake*

Edited by shrooma

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The "short" cubit is 18 inches or half a yard. ("a Foot and a half" - Isaac Newton.)

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid is 2000 cubits or 1000 yards.

http://www.xrayb.com...nd_the_yard.php

17.68 inches or just a little over 17 5/8'ths of an inch. That you wish it to be rounded off to 18 inches (1/2 yard) is irrelevant.

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid in Royal Cubits is 1758.37 cubits (2051.78 short cubits) or 1007.64 yards. Which means that you've overshot the mark by 241.62 Royal Cubits; undershot the mark by 51.78 short cubits and undershot the yardage by 7.64 yards.

cormac

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There was also a short cubit of 44.9

centimeters/ 17.68 inches .

.

The "short" cubit is 18 inches or half

a yard. ("a Foot and a half" - Isaac

Newton.)

The perimeter of the Great Pyramid

is 2000 cubits or 1000 yards.

.

there's a third of an inch difference between 17.68 inches and 18 inches.

multiply that by your 2000 cubit measure and you're left with a discrepancy of 50ft.

from an engineering perspective, that kind of tolerance level is unacceptable.

A.Thom tried this kind of thing when he argued for a 'megalithic yard' for the circle builders of europe. when you're measuring things out with string (as the circle & pyramid builders would've done), different tension levels used by different individuals would produce wildly different results.

a yardstick would've been too impractical.

the builders obviously had some kind of measuring system, you need one to engineer things (ancient theodolite anyone....?), but I don't think your way is the solution OP.

.

*edited for brandy spolling mistake*

Unacceptable?

If the Egyptians could estimate the diameter of the earth so closely, I'd call it "impressive".

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Unacceptable?

If the Egyptians could estimate the diameter of the earth so closely, I'd call it "impressive".

Could you please show us where the ancient Egyptians knew the diameter of the Earth?

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Unacceptable?

If the Egyptians could estimate the diameter of the earth so closely, I'd call it "impressive".

.

I wouldn't call a 50ft discrepancy in a 1000yd measurement ''impressive'' in any way, shape, or form CK, i'd call it an abysmal faliure.

but that's the difference between people who build things in real life, and people who don't I guess.

did you actually even read the post?

it would seem not, as nowhere did it concern the measurement of the earth, but the measurement of the GP.

unless of course, you consider the earth's diameter to be 2000 cubits....?

you really should start reading things through before you jump in King, you'd make a bit more sense that way, and have to spend less time wiping the egg from off your face.....

;-)

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Could you please show us where the ancient Egyptians knew the diameter of the Earth?

Sir Isaac Newton could not complete his Theory of Gravitation until he knew the circumference of the earth which he discovered was enshrined in the proportions of the Great Pyramid.

During the years 1637-82, Tito Burattini, an Italian architect, Egyptologist, scientist and engineer, measured the Great Pyramid of Giza four times. He and Newton used these measurements in an attempt to determine the precise dimensions of the Earth.

This information must have been known since the Pyramid was built.

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Sir Isaac Newton could not complete his Theory of Gravitation until he knew the circumference of the earth which he discovered was enshrined in the proportions of the Great Pyramid.

During the years 1637-82, Tito Burattini, an Italian architect, Egyptologist, scientist and engineer, measured the Great Pyramid of Giza four times. He and Newton used these measurements in an attempt to determine the precise dimensions of the Earth.

This information must have been known since the Pyramid was built.

And what does the love life of Mississippi mosquitoes has to do with something that happened 3000 years ago?

And I would like a link showing that Newton actually tried to measure the circumference of the earth using the pyramid as basis.

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Posted (edited)

.

I wouldn't call a 50ft discrepancy in a 1000yd measurement ''impressive'' in any way, shape, or form CK, i'd call it an abysmal faliure.

but that's the difference between people who build things in real life, and people who don't I guess.

did you actually even read the post?

it would seem not, as nowhere did it concern the measurement of the earth, but the measurement of the GP.

unless of course, you consider the earth's diameter to be 2000 cubits....?

you really should start reading things through before you jump in King, you'd make a bit more sense that way, and have to spend less time wiping the egg from off your face.....

;-)

Since we're talking about circumference and not diameter, regardless of cladkings post, the distance of 50 feet doesn't even come close. It's more like 167.095 MILES between Harte's modification of the OP's number and the actual number of 43,826,728.

(24,901.55 X 5280 feet per mile / 3 feet per yard = 294,088 yards / 1760 yards per mile = 167.095 miles)

cormac

Edited by cormac mac airt

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(the 50ft discrepancy was on the measurement of the pyramid, not the earth. dunno where the confusion's coming from as it states that in three posts. guess i've got some kind of speech impediment.....)

;-)

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