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redhen

2013 list of fur farms

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An updated 2013 list of fur farms in the U.S.A. and Canada was released recently, anonymously as always.

There is also an accompanying how-to guide to break in and release animals, but I'm not going to post the link. This list above is for educational purposes only. 85% of commercial fur in the U.S. and Canada is farmed, the remainder being trapped.

Militant environmental and animal rights groups are the No.1 domestic terror threat according to the FBI, despite the fact that they have never harmed any human, or animal.

Again, I am not advocating illegal activities as expressed under the 2006 Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act.

Activism is still allowed, violence is not. I just thought it might be interesting for people in the U.S. and Canada to find out if there is a fur farm in their area, it's not like they are well advertised.

"Whenever people say "We mustn't be sentimental", you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, "We must be realistic", they mean they are going to make money out of it. These slogans have a long history. After being used to justify slave traders, ruthless industrialists, and contractors who had found the most economically "realistic" method of cleaning a chimney was to force a small child to climb it, they now have been passed on, like an heirloom, to the factory farmers." -- Brigid Brophy

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About fifteen years ago, give or take. An animal rights group released all of the animals. These poor creatures didn't know any thing about being free. They all died with in a mile of th farm. They got ran over.

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The release of mink from a UK fur farm has to be the most irresponsible act ever by one of these groups.It's resulted in the deaths of millions of birds and animals where they have established themselves in the wild.Whole populations of other creatures have been wiped out.

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Posted (edited)

Honestly, there's just no need for this any longer...the artificial/fake fur that you can buy nowadays is wonderful . "Faux fur" is lighter in weight, sheds less, is easy to maintain and is beautiful. No real need to kill any animal just for its fur.

Edited by Lilly
left out a word
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About fifteen years ago, give or take. An animal rights group released all of the animals. These poor creatures didn't know any thing about being free. They all died with in a mile of th farm. They got ran over.

Whose fault is that? Their captors? Or their liberators?

Better they died a mile from the farm than on the farm. Better the farm scums didn't make a dollar of profit off of their deaths than full profits.

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Honestly, there's just no need for this any longer...the artificial/fake fur that you can buy nowadays is wonderful . "Faux fur" is lighter in weight, sheds less, is easy to maintain and is beautiful. No real need to kill any animal just for its fur.

And there is also so much old fur. The second hand stores here (and there are plenty. Hipster, ay!) are packed with all kind of furs, and all for low prices. If you want to wear a real fur, get an old one and honour the dead animal by wearing it.

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I understand the concern about freeing mink, I thought about it too. However I couldn't find any studies that had been conducted that demonstrated a significant negative effect on the native fauna. If anyone has read such a study could you please post the info?

What I found unbelievable was that Denmark leads in the number mink farms, ahead of the U.S. and Canada. It's such a small country, it's citizens cannot claim ignorance, surely.

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Posted (edited)

Heres a few on the mink

First journal; "Introduced by accidental escapes from fur farms, the American mink Mustela vison Schreb. was first recorded to breed in the British countryside in the late 1950s, since when it has rapidly colonized most of the waterways of Britain"

Last abstract; "Feral American mink (Mustela vison Schreb.) is possibly the greatest predation threat for vertebrate biodiversity in Europe, being linked to a wake of drastic declines and even local extinctions behind their invasion. The mink is a North American species, which escaped to North European environments over 80 years ago from fur farm"

There are studies on feral mink that were introduced 50 -80 years, much like other alien species that have overrun native fauna. What I'm looking for are studies about mink released by animal advocates.

Thanks for the work though, it shows an another example of the consequence of introduced alien species.

For those that might be interested, the ALF document that I referred to is called;

The Final Nail #4 Complete Guide to Destroying the Fur Industry

You can easily find it. There is other info besides the clandestine tips, which honestly, any Boy Scout worth his salt could figure out.

Edited by redhen

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Interesting site. They list fur farms, and also lab breeders, suppliers for the industry in general, slaughterhouses, fur trade associations and magazines...

I only hit a couple of my home states, but I also found it interesting how many notes of "may be closed- investigation needed" there was, along with notes of years old information. I really hope this site isn't just putting up the same information over and over without first checking to see if their information is still accurate- it would suck for a homeowner to have activists trespass and such based on old or inaccurate information.

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Doesn't sound like it.

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There are studies on feral mink that were introduced 50 -80 years, much like other alien species that have overrun native fauna. What I'm looking for are studies about mink released by animal advocates.

Thanks for the work though, it shows an another example of the consequence of introduced alien species.

Those were the only papers that I could find that allowed access without a login although some of the others I could see did mention releases. Id imagine that the impact would be worse than the escapees with larger numbers of animals.

I know that the lakes around me were hit hard after the activists released the mink. All the waterfowl are gone by my lake now bar a swan or two, there are fewer rabbits and hares etc. I saw one cruzing round my field, didn't care about me, no natural fear.

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I know that the lakes around me were hit hard after the activists released the mink. All the waterfowl are gone by my lake now bar a swan or two, there are fewer rabbits and hares etc. I saw one cruzing round my field, didn't care about me, no natural fear.

Yes, I would imagine these planned releases have an impact, that's why I have mixed feelings about them. I can understand the motivation, but I think it's a band aid solution. There's no reason to raise mink or other fur bearing mammals in the first place, except of course to make money. It's not like people would freeze to death without them, it's just a fashionable trend which hopefully will wain.

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Whose fault is that? Their captors? Or their liberators?

Better they died a mile from the farm than on the farm. Better the farm scums didn't make a dollar of profit off of their deaths than full profits.

Their liberators.

The rest of your post is pathitic. The more fur farms there are the less need to trap animals and maybe have the animal cheew it's own foot off or bleed to death.

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The more fur farms there are the less need to trap animals and maybe have the animal cheew it's own foot off or bleed to death.

But that begs the question, why kill animals for their fur at all, when there are much cheaper and more efficient materials?

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Their liberators.

The rest of your post is pathitic. The more fur farms there are the less need to trap animals and maybe have the animal cheew it's own foot off or bleed to death.

Blame liberators and not captors for captives not knowing anything about freedom? How do you pull that logic off?

As for your other statement, if a fur farm is widely available where someone would go to buy such a thing, then a clothing store will be available too where no animal has to die for their fur in the first place. Thus there's no "need". This would no longer be an issue about a lack of warm clothing, it's a fashion statement. As others have already indicated, alternatives to animal fur are available. And there'd be more of those if there were less fur farms.

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Posted (edited)

Blame liberators and not captors for captives not knowing anything about freedom? How do you pull that logic off?

As for your other statement, if a fur farm is widely available where someone would go to buy such a thing, then a clothing store will be available too where no animal has to die for their fur in the first place. Thus there's no "need". This would no longer be an issue about a lack of warm clothing, it's a fashion statement. As others have already indicated, alternatives to animal fur are available. And there'd be more of those if there were less fur farms.

Fur has always been a fashion statement. Except for the trappers. Also none fur coats are not as warm as fur coats. Although sheep and llamas provide fur with out killing the animal. I do agree with you on killing an animal for fur is bad. But, if the animals get killed faster than you can release them, you bhave done no goood.

Edited by danielost

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Fur has always been a fashion statement. Except for the trappers. Also none fur coats are not as warm as fur coats. Although sheep and llamas provide fur with out killing the animal. I do agree with you on killing an animal for fur is bad. But, if the animals get killed faster than you can release them, you bhave done no goood.

A fashion statement is a want, not a need. If warmth is the need, there are warmer coats than fur coats. So I still don't see the "need" for fur farms.

Animals are born with instincts and sensory brains. Deny them sensory inputs and the ability to practice those instinctual behaviors and there's who's at fault for the animal being helpless to survive in the wild.

Fur farms are for-profit. Killing their profit challenges their very existence. "Pathetic"? Not if you're against fur farms.

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The only coats that keep you warm when they are wet are wool.

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The only coats that you know of, and wool isn't fur.

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Posted (edited)

But that begs the question, why kill animals for their fur at all, when there are much cheaper and more efficient materials?

Well, I thought that fake fur was better.( for those who liked fur ) It is cheaper and looks the real deal.....I never knew they still killed animals for fur..I was under a rock and didn't know .. I am gobsmacked..

Good gravy, Cruella Devil eat your heart out...

The only coats that you know of, and wool isn't fur.

Ok, that made me laugh....lol daniel will come back and say - Yes it is, we have furry sheep in our fields !!!! :P

Edited by Beckys_Mom
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A fashion statement is a want, not a need. If warmth is the need, there are warmer coats than fur coats. So I still don't see the "need" for fur farms.

Wearing fur coats is definitely for fashion only, unless you are Innuit or Lapp, etc.

"Usually the Inuit wore clothing with two layers of caribou skin: an inner layer with the fur facing the skin, and an outer layer with the fur facing out."

http://www.firstpeop.../fp_inuit5.html

I've never seen a retail fur coat with an inner layer with the fur facing the skin, which just makes sense if you really need it for warmth.

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