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Yamato

Ben Shalom Bernanke: What Are You Afraid Of?

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I am afraid of sharks driving tanks.

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I am afraid of sharks driving tanks.

With entitlement complexes this deep and ponzi schemes this rich, it might as well be sharks driving tanks because that's how misled the American people are about what they're afraid of. A voting block of haves and hopeful have-nots a hundred million strong comprised of thick-headed statists who think they have the right to use other peoples' money to pad the prices of what they own on the backs of dupes who are cowed into complicity, afraid of following the rule of law and not letting the banksters rip them off. It's the biggest sham on the free market in the history of mankind. And people try to use their political ideology and partisan politics to excuse this. It's a waste of time. No amount of damage man can do to himself, no amount of class warfare or welfare/warfare statism is going to beat the market in the end. We can drink irradiated sand out of our canteens because there's no more drinking water left after the global thermonuclear war and some survivors are going to appear on the horizon looking for something to trade.

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Posted (edited)

What an annoying pompous loser. The Alex Jones of the stock market. It's like his ego was gonna explode any second.

Anyway, everybody knows what Bernanke is afraid of, because he himself admits of what he is afraid. That after bloating the market with QE's, it's gonna be terra incognita once the meddling stops.The economy isn't strong enough yet, not by a long shot. It's only starting to shows signs that it may be improving. So this Santelli guy can suck it. Another one of those special lil beings who thinks of himself as the messiah of truth. Pathetic.

I say everybody knows this because it's very clear if you only look at how the markets react when Bernanke only mentions that possibly sometime in the middle of the year 2014 the bond buying will stop, IF the economy is ready for it. And BAM more than -2 % percent. The markets were already freaking out over a possibly slowing down of the bond buying the last couple of weeks, and now Bernanke basically said he's definitely not stopping it, but it may slow down near the end of this year, IF the economy is strong. So he only said good things actually. But investors are afraid that everything will collapse without , or with less stimulus.\

The market is super annoying right now, because Bernanke basically said exactly what the markets wanted to hear, but whatever... they are AGAIN freaking out about it prematurely. Another hissy fit of the insecure addicted market. Pfffffffff...Actually Santelli is like the personification of the market right now, queen of hissy fits.

Edited by Render

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Santelli is a good reporter when he sticks to reporting data, but his ideological bias gets in the way and his manner completely repels me. (Yes, we get CNBC in Vietnam via satellite, although it is delayed about ten minutes so the authorities have a chance to censor if they want, although I've never noticed such a thing).

I think Bernanki is doing the best that can be done in the circumstances of a paralyzed Congress and an business hostile (or at least business uncomprehending) President. The economic growth that he has managed to squeeze out of the US economy has reduced the scary budget deficit, and there is no inflation in sight, so loose money is called for, even throwing it out of helicopters.

If Obama doesn't renonominate him, it will be because Obama doesn't understand what the economy needs and is playing politics. A lot will of course depend on who he names, but regardless it will mean a confirmation battle that the US economy right now does not need.

The drop in Wall Street and around the world on a breath of tightening is knee-jerk "sell on the news" programmatic stuff, and I don't think means much (except don't get in for a few months).

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What an annoying pompous loser. The Alex Jones of the stock market. It's like his ego was gonna explode any second.

Anyway, everybody knows what Bernanke is afraid of, because he himself admits of what he is afraid. That after bloating the market with QE's, it's gonna be terra incognita once the meddling stops.The economy isn't strong enough yet, not by a long shot. It's only starting to shows signs that it may be improving. So this Santelli guy can suck it. Another one of those special lil beings who thinks of himself as the messiah of truth. Pathetic.

I say everybody knows this because it's very clear if you only look at how the markets react when Bernanke only mentions that possibly sometime in the middle of the year 2014 the bond buying will stop, IF the economy is ready for it. And BAM more than -2 % percent. The markets were already freaking out over a possibly slowing down of the bond buying the last couple of weeks, and now Bernanke basically said he's definitely not stopping it, but it may slow down near the end of this year, IF the economy is strong. So he only said good things actually. But investors are afraid that everything will collapse without , or with less stimulus.\

The market is super annoying right now, because Bernanke basically said exactly what the markets wanted to hear, but whatever... they are AGAIN freaking out about it prematurely. Another hissy fit of the insecure addicted market. Pfffffffff...Actually Santelli is like the personification of the market right now, queen of hissy fits.

Isn't strong enough yet for what? Who's the keeper of what "strong enough" is?

Terra incognita? The only way the removal of all this stimulus could be unknown territory is if one doesn't know anything about how the US economy worked in the 20th century. QE didn't start until after George W. Bush appointed Ben Bernanke.

We know what's going to happen once the meddling stops. Interest rates are going up, and all these artificially inflated prices the Fed is trying so hard to keep propped up are coming back down. The Dow loses over 500 points in two days on the mere whiff of this happening. There's no sturdy foundation underneath easy prices made by easy money. What is the market doing reacting to what Ben Bernanke says either way in the first place? That should be enough of a hint that this is no sound market.

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Posted (edited)

Santelli is a good reporter when he sticks to reporting data, but his ideological bias gets in the way and his manner completely repels me. (Yes, we get CNBC in Vietnam via satellite, although it is delayed about ten minutes so the authorities have a chance to censor if they want, although I've never noticed such a thing).

I think Bernanki is doing the best that can be done in the circumstances of a paralyzed Congress and an business hostile (or at least business uncomprehending) President. The economic growth that he has managed to squeeze out of the US economy has reduced the scary budget deficit, and there is no inflation in sight, so loose money is called for, even throwing it out of helicopters.

If Obama doesn't renonominate him, it will be because Obama doesn't understand what the economy needs and is playing politics. A lot will of course depend on who he names, but regardless it will mean a confirmation battle that the US economy right now does not need.

The drop in Wall Street and around the world on a breath of tightening is knee-jerk "sell on the news" programmatic stuff, and I don't think means much (except don't get in for a few months).

No inflation in sight?

wow

Edited by acidhead
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Yes -- in fact its dropped most recently.

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Yup Frank is right. They have to be more worried about deflation instead inflation for the time being.

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Santelli is a good reporter when he sticks to reporting data, but his ideological bias gets in the way and his manner completely repels me. (Yes, we get CNBC in Vietnam via satellite, although it is delayed about ten minutes so the authorities have a chance to censor if they want, although I've never noticed such a thing).

I think Bernanki is doing the best that can be done in the circumstances of a paralyzed Congress and an business hostile (or at least business uncomprehending) President. The economic growth that he has managed to squeeze out of the US economy has reduced the scary budget deficit, and there is no inflation in sight, so loose money is called for, even throwing it out of helicopters.

If Obama doesn't renonominate him, it will be because Obama doesn't understand what the economy needs and is playing politics. A lot will of course depend on who he names, but regardless it will mean a confirmation battle that the US economy right now does not need.

The drop in Wall Street and around the world on a breath of tightening is knee-jerk "sell on the news" programmatic stuff, and I don't think means much (except don't get in for a few months).

If the market needs 85 thousand million more dollars buying mortgages every month along with zero percent interest rates for the bankers and imposing state-programmed creatively calculated inflation rates for the people who own all the assets out there, then the obvious conclusion is the economy isn't as great as Santelli has to hear it is fifty times a day on CNBC. This is just politics and pushing on a string until the next election cycle takes its course.

The market wants what it's always wanted. Lower prices for people to afford to buy what they demand because they don't already have it. That's where real economic growth comes from. It doesn't hurt me that the smart phone I'm using right now can be bought on Amazon for less than $100. Nobody is complaining about how cheap computers are. It's where the subsidization lies that the insolvency and inflation are found.

Do you watch financial news? Do you get Bloomberg, CNBC, or Fox Business in Vietnam? "Ideological bias"? Because he's not singing along in the choir of CEOs and market analysts that parade onto his station every day talking about how great the economy is? What bias is that? The one that asks the questions instead of just cheering the rainbows.

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No inflation in sight?

wow

And the economy is great too, that's the other mantra they're playing every ten minutes of the day, except when the million dollar question is dropped, "Then what's all the QE for?", the guy who's agreeing with him needs to run back to cover his neck with rhetoric like "it's only starting to show signs that it might be improving". Hell, if that's what Santelli was hearing from the figures he hears from all day every day he wouldn't have made that "annoying pompous loser" rant in the first place.

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Isn't strong enough yet for what? Who's the keeper of what "strong enough" is?

Terra incognita? The only way the removal of all this stimulus could be unknown territory is if one doesn't know anything about how the US economy worked in the 20th century. QE didn't start until after George W. Bush appointed Ben Bernanke.

We know what's going to happen once the meddling stops. Interest rates are going up, and all these artificially inflated prices the Fed is trying so hard to keep propped up are coming back down. The Dow loses over 500 points in two days on the mere whiff of this happening. There's no sturdy foundation underneath easy prices made by easy money. What is the market doing reacting to what Ben Bernanke says either way in the first place? That should be enough of a hint that this is no sound market.

Who's the keeper of what is strong enough? You simply follow the job reports, housing reports, etc ... this determines if the market is strong enough. And lately it has shown the beginning of somewhat consisting signs of recovery. So we aren't there yet, at all. But recovery is beginning.

Terra incognita because the market has been stimulated for 5 years now. So it's anxious as to what will happen without it. You have to understand the madness of the markets for this. There are always big investors that are looking for an excuse to sell. This whole QE thing provides an oppurtunity. Bernanke is saying only good things "he wants to get the economy strong and then lay off bond buying" Which would be great. But the market chooses to be scared prematurely. So whatever, that's just how it works. Just like how the markets kept freaking about a non existing Grexit last year. There's always a doom scenario to freak out over. That's why i say the markets are annoying.

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And the economy is great too, that's the other mantra they're playing every ten minutes of the day, except when the million dollar question is dropped, "Then what's all the QE for?", the guy who's agreeing with him needs to run back to cover his neck with rhetoric like "it's only starting to show signs that it might be improving". Hell, if that's what Santelli was hearing from the figures he hears from all day every day he wouldn't have made that "annoying pompous loser" rant in the first place.

If somebody is saying the economy is great, then you have to change your channel. Because the people at the top say anything but. Again, listen to the past and recent presentations Bernanke made. He repeatedly said we shouldn't get ahead of ourselves and that the economy is showing sings of recovery but isn't there yet at all.

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Who's the keeper of what is strong enough? You simply follow the job reports, housing reports, etc ... this determines if the market is strong enough. And lately it has shown the beginning of somewhat consisting signs of recovery. So we aren't there yet, at all. But recovery is beginning.

Terra incognita because the market has been stimulated for 5 years now. So it's anxious as to what will happen without it. You have to understand the madness of the markets for this. There are always big investors that are looking for an excuse to sell. This whole QE thing provides an oppurtunity. Bernanke is saying only good things "he wants to get the economy strong and then lay off bond buying" Which would be great. But the market chooses to be scared prematurely. So whatever, that's just how it works. Just like how the markets kept freaking about a non existing Grexit last year. There's always a doom scenario to freak out over. That's why i say the markets are annoying.

The markets reacting on sentiment is independent of Ben Bernanke, Quantitative Easing, and the strength of the economy. People are anxious that interest rates are going up and prices are coming down after the stimulus is lifted? Well they damn well should be. And who gets to decide how long we kick the can down the road and what this "recovery" is supposed to be defined as until the pain from all this government booze is finally allowed to happen? The Federal Reserve system and the greasy politicians that appointed it to fix prices, set interest rates, control employment, and appease the markets.

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Posted (edited)

The markets reacting on sentiment is independent of Ben Bernanke, Quantitative Easing, and the strength of the economy. People are anxious that interest rates are going up and prices are coming down after the stimulus is lifted? Well they damn well should be. And who gets to decide how long we kick the can down the road and what this "recovery" is supposed to be defined as until the pain from all this government booze is finally allowed to happen? The Federal Reserve system and the greasy politicians that appointed it to fix prices, set interest rates, control employment, and appease the markets.

Independent??? It's the only reason it's freaking out now and the past couple of weeks. Don't you follow the markets at all? . It's QE and the negative China reports. And when it's not that it will be speculation of what will happen in Europe.

Of course they are anxious, but prematurely now. They're freaking about something that may happen a year from now. And Bernanke isn't looking to drop the economy, he's looking for a soft landing. I'm very interested in seeing him attempt this.

If anything the markets are finally getting more realistic about reacting to the economy. How the markets move will become more and more dependent of the strenth of the economy, last couple of months have proven this.

Edited by Render

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Posted (edited)

The world economy is sub-par but not terrible. This is I think mainly because of European digestion troubles, Obama's regulatory and tax attitudes, the Republican failure to understand economic reality, and a Chinese cycle. Put them together and a few other less important things and you get what we see.

The main rule when there is little inflation and high unemployment is to avoid austerity. People like Sanatelli are hard-money austerity no deficit types, and so disapprove of what the Fed is doing. They are wrong and the Fed is right.

Oh, we get Bloomberg, Fox News, CNN, CNBC, BBC and several Australian and Asian news and business broadcasts. The only thing I really miss about TV here as opposed to the States is PBS and the Cable Public Affairs Channels. I don't miss the standard US networks one bit.

Edited by Frank Merton

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If somebody is saying the economy is great, then you have to change your channel. Because the people at the top say anything but. Again, listen to the past and recent presentations Bernanke made. He repeatedly said we shouldn't get ahead of ourselves and that the economy is showing sings of recovery but isn't there yet at all.

Well who the hell is Ben Bernanke listening to? Not anyone every day on every financial news network on cable. I think you're putting all your faith into one guy and ignoring everyone else. Who gave Ben Bernanke a monopoly on data?

It's not "there yet" because as soon as he takes his foot off the pedal the economy is going to crash and that's not a popular thing to do when you're beholden to the politicians who appointed you. Maybe Obama needs to appoint someone with a more pessimistic tone to sucker the dying middle class into owing the tab on another new round of stimulus juice? That gloom money will be real good news to the people who own the assets and would love nothing more than to put you in even more of their debt.

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Well who the hell is Ben Bernanke listening to? Not anyone every day on every financial news network on cable. I think you're putting all your faith into one guy and ignoring everyone else. Who gave Ben Bernanke a monopoly on data?

It's not "there yet" because as soon as he takes his foot off the pedal the economy is going to crash and that's not a popular thing to do when you're beholden to the politicians who appointed you. Maybe Obama needs to appoint someone with a more pessimistic tone to sucker the dying middle class into owing the tab on another new round of stimulus juice? That gloom money will be real good news to the people who own the assets and would love nothing more than to put you in even more of their debt.

What???? This data is public knowledge, that's what markets reacts to. What the hell....so Bernanke is only drawing the conclusions everyone else can draw. Apart from the sensationlist conspiracy theorists.

It's not there yet because the numbers are only beginning to improve, so yes more stimulus is required to set a trend . DUh.

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I think it's probably about right to say the market will drop if interest rates go up. They compete with each other.

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Independent??? It's the only reason it's freaking out now and the past couple of weeks. Don't you follow the markets at all? . It's QE and the negative China reports. And when it's not that it will be speculation of what will happen in Europe.

Of course they are anxious, but prematurely now. They're freaking about something that may happen a year from now. And Bernanke isn't looking to drop the economy, he's looking for a soft landing. I'm very interested in seeing him attempt this.

If anything the markets are finally getting more realistic about reacting to the economy. How the markets move will become more and more dependent of the strenth of the economy, last couple of months have proven this.

Why are the markets only going to correlate to the economy now? Market prices inflate just like any other prices. No inflation in sight? Do you follow the markets at all?

Bernanke is keeping interest rates at zero. You can't do that forever. Whatever statistic it is he's trying to centrally plan until it hits some magic figure he's arbitrarily deciding on isn't going to matter when the interest rates go back up and the bills come due. This is repeating all the mistakes of the past like we haven't learned a thing. You're interested in seeing an outcome because you're half-expecting a different result. The difference between this result and the last result is this time the debt is going to be far greater than it was.

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Posted (edited)

I think it's probably about right to say the market will drop if interest rates go up. They compete with each other.

Of course, and that will be the challenge. To find a soft landing.

Edited by Render
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What???? This data is public knowledge, that's what markets reacts to. What the hell....so Bernanke is only drawing the conclusions everyone else can draw. Apart from the sensationlist conspiracy theorists.

It's not there yet because the numbers are only beginning to improve, so yes more stimulus is required to set a trend . DUh.

Yeah, and the economy never worked without QE in the past. We never allowed the necessary corrections, worked through the recessions and recovered without it.

I think you're subscribing to one hell of a good conspiracy theory to think that it has to continue being fixed like it has for the past six years in order to improve. If you enjoy artificially high prices and fake recoveries, by all means, keep the faith. Ben Bernanke's been wrong about everything he's ever said since he's been appointed Chairman. I don't understand why anyone would believe a word he says.

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Posted (edited)

Why are the markets only going to correlate to the economy now? Market prices inflate just like any other prices. No inflation in sight? Do you follow the markets at all?

Bernanke is keeping interest rates at zero. You can't do that forever. Whatever statistic it is he's trying to centrally plan until it hits some magic figure he's arbitrarily deciding on isn't going to matter when the interest rates go back up and the bills come due. This is repeating all the mistakes of the past like we haven't learned a thing. You're interested in seeing an outcome because you're half-expecting a different result. The difference between this result and the last result is this time the debt is going to be far greater than it was.

The markets are beginning to correlate with the strength of the economy now, because since a couple of months ago we have been shown signs of recovery. And the market reacted fiercly bullish to it. When the strength of the economy is threatened by loosening QE, it reacted with a massive bear raid. See yesterday as a great example of this. So the markets are beginning to be more cautious and are looking at the numbers of the reports with eagle eyes. Looking for signs that go either way. As do the Feds, which is why they stated, if the economy doesn't keep up the current beginning of the trend, it will not loosen QE.

Inflation is not in sight no, you really have to read more data for this. Although it's pretty obvious.

Again, the outcome will be interesting. The Feds are trying to ignite a working autonomous economy, so if QE stops it can take the initial shock and just move on with little, possible, losses. That's the whole point.

If the economy is deemed strong enough to go ahead without QE, this is also means it is deemed strong enough to pay of debts.

Edited by Render
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The markets are beginning to correlate with the strenth of the economy now, because since a couple of months ago we have been shown signs of recovery. And the market reacted fiercly bullish to it. When the strenth of the economy is threatened but loosening QE it reacted with a massive bear raid. See yesterday as a great example of this. So the markets are beginning to be more cautious and are looking at the numbers of the reports with eagle eyes. Looking for signs that go either way. As do the Feds, which is why they stated, if the economy doesn't keep up the current beginning of the trend, it will not loosen QE.

Inflation is not in sight no, you really have to read more data for this. Although it's pretty obvious.

Again, the outcome will be interesting. The Feds are trying to ignite a working autonomous economy, so if QE stops it can take the initial shock and just move on with little, possible, losses. That's the whole point.

If the economy is deemed strong enough to go ahead without QE, this is also means it is deemed strong enough to pay of debts.

No, recovery doesn't increase correlation. The eyes aren't more eagle now than they were last year. "Recovery" doesn't either. What increases correlation is getting central planners and price fixers in marble halls using government power out of the way of the market so it can do what it's inevitably going to do anyway. Distorting the market and inflating prices under zero percent interest rates for the people closest to the government money doesn't promote recovery. The market would never have zero percent interest rates on its own. When debt goes up and credit ratings go down, interest rates would rise. Bathing the economy in artificial light is the opposite of correlation. Who is "The Feds"? In attempting to answer my questions, you're now smacking of ninjadude all of a sudden. You already said that you think the outcome will be interesting, you don't have to repeat yourself.

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No, recovery doesn't increase correlation. The eyes aren't more eagle now than they were last year. "Recovery" doesn't either. What increases correlation is getting central planners and price fixers in marble halls using government power out of the way of the market so it can do what it's inevitably going to do anyway. Distorting the market and inflating prices under zero percent interest rates for the people closest to the government money doesn't promote recovery. The market would never have zero percent interest rates on its own. When debt goes up and credit ratings go down, interest rates would rise. Bathing the economy in artificial light is the opposite of correlation. Who is "The Feds"? In attempting to answer my questions, you're now smacking of ninjadude all of a sudden. You already said that you think the outcome will be interesting, you don't have to repeat yourself.

You are mistaking.

The eyes were more focussed on Europe last year and speculation of what might happen or not. It was pretty pointless. Now, since the economy is showing signs of improvement, they are focussed more and more on the numbers. Im sorry if you can't accept this simple truth. Maybe you should lay of the markets for a while, because all this panic and Santelli talk can't be good for you.

Apparantly i do have to repeat this bit: The Feds are trying to ignite a working autonomous economy, so if QE stops it can take the initial shock and just move on with little, possible, losses. That's the whole point.

If the economy is deemed strong enough to go ahead without QE, this is also means it is deemed strong enough to pay of debts.

If you still don't get it, then just leave this conversation all together.

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