Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 3
danielost

good news, the american family is one again.

16 posts in this topic

I watched hannaty last night. He had a studio adence. All black american. They told him that they were tired of self-setergation. So african-american is out. It is now american.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are all American if we are citizens no matter where we came from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched hannaty last night. He had a studio adence. All black american. They told him that they were tired of self-setergation. So african-american is out. It is now american.

We shouldn't describe ourselves as Polish Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, etc.....We're all Americans!

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

To us here, it doesn't matter what color you are, you are all Americans ..

It depends on the American ..Some may want the full title IE Italian American...Some just call themselves Americans.

In the end that's is what you all are - Americans ..

I love how you all are so proud of your country and proud to be Americans..

Edited by Beckys_Mom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patriotism is the highest form of Collectivism. Trading nationalities achieves the same collective result. Humanity is thus divided and the individual more easily manipulated by the majority.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To a non-native English speaker, the word "American" is full of problems. First, what do you call Canadians or Mexicans or Cubans or Brazilians. Aren't they all "Americans" too. When referring to the countries, it's possible to say things like, "the US," or "the States," and not have to refer to the States as "America." However, no informal way to refer to residents of the US exists (at least none that doesn't in some contexts have negative connotations -- "Yanks" comes to mind but there are some Americans who don't like it.

Vietnamese is easier. We have the word "mi" (pronounced "mee") that derives from a similar Chinese word meaning "beautiful land," and it is here used informally to refer to anything American. It is a singularly positive expression that loses the affirmation implication in translation. For this reason the anti-American government discouraged it for awhile but now has not only accepted it but encourages it.

I think the idea of "hyphenated Americans" is a good one. People should be proud of both their heritage and their present nationality, and I see no reason why one should rule out the other.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would recommend distinguishing between "patriotism" (love of a fatherland) and "jingoism," (my country is better than others).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teddy would disagree, Frank.

"There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all … The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic … There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else."

-Theodore Roosevelt

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not quite sure what it is about the first Roosevelt president that should make his opinion here valid. Reading what he says I discern logical fallacies and emotional propaganda. Looked at objectively, the paragraph you quote is not persuasive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was it "emotional propaganda" when he spoke those words, probably so. But regardless, it's a simple truth. So basically what he's saying, for example: Calling todays Americans, African Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans, Native Americans and so on, is just plain ignorant, since we all live in one country and not anywhere else in the world. And doing such a thing causes a rift among us, separates us, divides us, which is what some of the outside world wants. We are not anything else, but Americans, despite our cultural heritages and where we came from. You live in our country, you are an American, it's just that simple.

We are nothing but Americans and we have no need for hyphenated terms in front of that. We don't speak hyphenated Americanism when go up against a enemy of the country. We all band together as Americans, as it should be, and when asked by allies or the enemy, we all say we are Americans, nothing more. No matter what our race or cultural backgrounds may be, to do otherwise is quite frankly...ridiculous.

No hyphenated Americanism required or needed. So for us, what Roosevelt said, is valid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not quite sure what it is about the first Roosevelt president that should make his opinion here valid. Reading what he says I discern logical fallacies and emotional propaganda. Looked at objectively, the paragraph you quote is not persuasive.

No frank, the best way to get more citizens to root for you is to dived them. Such as the jews are evil, the rich only care about themselves things like that. What teddy was saying is if you allow people to call themselves something-american your dividing the nation. The person who started the african-american name has had a lot of power out of it. In fact he ran for president. He is jesse jankson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Hannity got an audience full of black people and that renders the term African-American defunct? I didn't know he was a wizard on top of being a blowhard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Americans tend to be cruel to each other. But when something bad happens those differences go away for a while. Look what happned in new york, no one there was seeing skin color. You helped the first person you come to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Hannity got an audience full of black people and that renders the term African-American defunct? I didn't know he was a wizard on top of being a blowhard.

He didn't say it they did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think about Vietque (overseas Vietnamese). We know they are (those who went to the States) Americans, but they are still also Vietnamese, and we are a bit proud of what some of them have achieved. These are by and large a group of people who did not sit on their hands crying about how events had been unjust. Instead, they got on with their lives.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 3

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.