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danielost

what i hate about police shows.

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What I hate about any police how and most movies is that the only person who demands their rights is all most always the guilty party.

If there is a known crook or rich, these are the only exceptions.

I mean all you have to o is wait for the demanding of rights. Those rights belong to everyone not just crooks.

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What I hate about them, it when the person stops resisting, 20 cops jump on a 10 pound guy.

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That's because demanding your right when you are innocent is generally counterproductive.

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No, the problem is no one demands their rights. If an officer wants to search your car tell no problem. Go get a warrent. I am sure that you demand all your rights in vietnam, no matter how many you have.

If you don't we will end up with things like stop and frisk.

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Whenever I watch a police show, I'm always amazed at the amount of people who talk to the police. I learned at a fairly young age (via the InterWebs, friends, etc) that it's best to refrain from talking to the police (when they stop you, I mean.... not when you're calling for emergency help). In some places in the USA, you have to invoke your right to remain silent (as in you have to literally say, "I invoke my right to remain silent") but in other places you simply don't say anything (although, depending on where you live, you may be required to show ID or give them your name). A lawyer is much better at talking to the police on your behalf (and knows how to deal with them) better than you. For more information, I suggest you watch the lecture entitled "Don't Talk to the Police" by Professor James Duane or visit the ACLU's website and search for "Know You Rights."

NOTE: I'm NOT a lawyer; please don't misconstrue this as legal advice.

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No, the problem is no one demands their rights. If an officer wants to search your car tell no problem. Go get a warrent. I am sure that you demand all your rights in vietnam, no matter how many you have.

If you don't we will end up with things like stop and frisk.

That's just being silly. Demand a warrant and you will sit around a few hours while they go get one, they will be very suspicious of you, and may even be tempted to plant evidence because they think you are guilty. I think Americans watch too much TV.
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Insisting on your right to remain silent is a good way to get a trip down to the station and to incur the cost of a lawyer. If they have already hauled you down to the station, then you may want to shut up until a lawyer is present, but he will advise you to cooperate as much as possible without incriminating yourself.

The rule against self-incrimination is American, not found in many if not most countries, and really serves little purpose other than making police work more expensive and time-consuming, and occasionally letting someone guilty off the hook.

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Whenever I watch a police show, I'm always amazed at the amount of people who talk to the police. I learned at a fairly young age (via the InterWebs, friends, etc) that it's best to refrain from talking to the police (when they stop you, I mean.... not when you're calling for emergency help). In some places in the USA, you have to invoke your right to remain silent (as in you have to literally say, "I invoke my right to remain silent") but in other places you simply don't say anything (although, depending on where you live, you may be required to show ID or give them your name). A lawyer is much better at talking to the police on your behalf (and knows how to deal with them) better than you. For more information, I suggest you watch the lecture entitled "Don't Talk to the Police" by Professor James Duane or visit the ACLU's website and search for "Know You Rights."

NOTE: I'm NOT a lawyer; please don't misconstrue this as legal advice.

No disrespect to you, but I would certainly not take this as legal advise. If you have nothing to hide then whats the problem with talking to them?

Generally when people invoke their right to remain silent, it means they are hiding something or we are talking about something a bit more serious than stealing a car or a bottle of vodka from the local off license!

You have to put this "not talking to the police" in perspective to the actual alleged crime.

Remember when they show the people they have stopped on these shows, a lot ARE drunk or on drugs and have committed a crime and are in no position to think of any other thing but trying to get away, hence the chase, the crash, the arrest and the show.

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That's just being silly. Demand a warrant and you will sit around a few hours while they go get one, they will be very suspicious of you, and may even be tempted to plant evidence because they think you are guilty. I think Americans watch too much TV.

Perhaps or they'll let you go. On the show greatist police shows. The catch the crook because the crook gives them permission to search the vehicle.

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Insisting on your right to remain silent is a good way to get a trip down to the station and to incur the cost of a lawyer. If they have already hauled you down to the station, then you may want to shut up until a lawyer is present, but he will advise you to cooperate as much as possible without incriminating yourself.

The rule against self-incrimination is American, not found in many if not most countries, and really serves little purpose other than making police work more expensive and time-consuming, and occasionally letting someone guilty off the hook.

Here in the usa, demanding your rights does not mean your guilty, and the police cannot make that connection. I am sure they will but they can't move on it for that reason.

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My understanding (here it's from watching American police shows, so goes to show) is that the police can search a car if they have "reasonable cause," whatever the hell that means. I think though you are right and that if you refused permission, if the offense is not too serious, they would probably be lazy and let it go.

I remember one time though when I was young a New York traffic officer got a Judge off the golf course on a Sunday to give me a ticket for speeding (I was going over 100). He had to have a judge do it because I was not from the States. It took about an hour and he hollered at me almost the whole time.

Here in the usa, demanding your rights does not mean your guilty, and the police cannot make that connection. I am sure they will but they can't move on it for that reason.

I'm sure they are not supposed to make that connection, but they will anyway. I would too.

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No disrespect to you, but I would certainly not take this as legal advise. If you have nothing to hide then whats the problem with talking to them?

Generally when people invoke their right to remain silent, it means they are hiding something or we are talking about something a bit more serious than stealing a car or a bottle of vodka from the local off license!

You have to put this "not talking to the police" in perspective to the actual alleged crime.

Remember when they show the people they have stopped on these shows, a lot ARE drunk or on drugs and have committed a crime and are in no position to think of any other thing but trying to get away, hence the chase, the crash, the arrest and the show.

No disrespect to you, but I would certainly not take this as legal advise. If you have nothing to hide then whats the problem with talking to them?

Generally when people invoke their right to remain silent, it means they are hiding something or we are talking about something a bit more serious than stealing a car or a bottle of vodka from the local off license!

You have to put this "not talking to the police" in perspective to the actual alleged crime.

Remember when they show the people they have stopped on these shows, a lot ARE drunk or on drugs and have committed a crime and are in no position to think of any other thing but trying to get away, hence the chase, the crash, the arrest and the show.

What's the problem with talking to the police? If you do some research on police relations in the USA, you'd be surprised at how harmful it is to talk to the police, whether you're guilty or not.

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What's the problem with talking to the police? If you do some research on police relations in the USA, you'd be surprised at how harmful it is to talk to the police, whether you're guilty or not.

And Americans accuse Vietnam of being a police state. Ironic.
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What's the problem with talking to the police? If you do some research on police relations in the USA, you'd be surprised at how harmful it is to talk to the police, whether you're guilty or not.

DITTO FRANK MERTON.

And this is the country which thinks it has a right to go into other people countries and yet it seems there is a serious problem within their own walls?

Do not get me wrong, no way am I anti American, far from it, but when people come out and say that you just can not talk to the police full stop, I really have to wonder about that person and what kind of people they hang around with.

How could you possibly have no faith in the people who are there to protect you? ( We all know there are some bad apples) but its a sad state of affairs if you have no respect for any of them at all!

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First off, my hair is standing on end. What kind of a world is this as portrayed by these comments? There are so many points I could take up, but I won't. Instead, I'll raise another one: police uniforms. You just have to look at them, to FEEL them, to know what the police are about ---- and it's not friendly. In the UK the uniforms are black. It's the costume of intimidation. The Klu Klux Klan have a "uniform"; you only have to look at it, to be in the presence of someone wearing it, to KNOW what it's about, and it's not about anything that's good for you. The police wear a different costume, but the feel in the presence of the police wearing that costume, in not a million miles different.

I want to have nothing to do with the police. When one came to my front door, my instant reaction was fear and suspicion. What's he here for? What have I done? One time, the police came to my door to return my lost passport to me. The whole demeanour of the man unsettled me. Even when he gave me my passport, I had a vague sense of disquiet, a sense of being somehow in the wrong. I almost expected some sort of accusation. When I'm driving in my car and see police vehicles, I instantly tense up, check my speed, wonder what else they could get me for --- and I'm not a fast driver. When I was younger and less experienced, I once reported a dangerous situation caused by a driverless vehicle under power to a policeman on his beat. I thought I was doing a "public duty". The policeman treated me in an extremely high-handed, suspicious manner, making me feel as if I had done something wrong. And people say, "if you haven't done anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about", well I've nothing to worry about, but I still worry, still feel uncomfortable, unsettled, even threatened by police presence. Does this really sound like an organisation that is intended to keep society safe? I've never been in prison, but somehow I kind of feel that prison warders must exude the same bad vibes to prisoners ---- and therein lies the truth of the police force.

In local schools these days the police are very much in evidence as "community policemen" i.e. their role is supposedly "friendly", "forging links with the local community" etc. Their presence in schools makes me similarly on edge and feeling intimidated and one feels that one is always looking over one's shoulder to see if the policeman is around. Far from improving the school atmosphere, I think they make it worse. In fact, one of these school policemen called me out of my classroom. He had one of my pupils with him and he gave the pupil a reprimand in front of me. The boy didn't look like he cared that much. However, when the policeman said to the boy words to the effect of "What's your teacher going to think of you?", the way one does when one thinks it matters to someone what someone else thinks, I knew the boy didn't give a toss. The policeman apparently didn't. This is off the topic of fear, but it does rather highlight the poor grasp of the reality of human nature that the police have --- which considering their job, considering how much they are dealing with people, how much of their work depends on successfully communicating with people, is pretty damning.

Inevitably I have had numerous other encounters with the police and if any of them have created anything other than bad feeling, whether it be fear or anger or whatever, then I can't remember it.

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What's the problem with talking to the police? If you do some research on police relations in the USA, you'd be surprised at how harmful it is to talk to the police, whether you're guilty or not.

I think freetoroam was talking about you personally, not other Americans

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I think freetoroam was talking about you personally, not other Americans

You mean, what's the harm in ME talking to the police, as opposed to the general populace?

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Posted (edited)

What i like least is , there are just way too many COP shows on. ...Whatever sells .. is quickly mimicked . Until it goes the way of the Hoola Hoop ?

*

Edited by lightly
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You mean, what's the harm in ME talking to the police, as opposed to the general populace?

If you read my post again you will see that what I mean is people like you (that sounds worse than it meant to be ) but I very much doubt the whole of the American populace feel the same and if they did, your country has a serious problem on their hands.

But hey, never mind, you always have lawyers to talk to instead......and aint they just dandy and honest!!

disgusted-clint-eastwood.gif

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I agree there are to many on tv. Almost every show is some kind of police story.

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your country has a serious problem on their hands.

Yes, it does.

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What I hate about any police how and most movies is that the only person who demands their rights is all most always the guilty party.

If there is a known crook or rich, these are the only exceptions.

I mean all you have to o is wait for the demanding of rights. Those rights belong to everyone not just crooks.

Check out Vinnie Jones Worlds toughest cops..... its on youtube.

Awesom show.

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Whenever I watch a police show, I'm always amazed at the amount of people who talk to the police. I learned at a fairly young age (via the InterWebs, friends, etc) that it's best to refrain from talking to the police (when they stop you, I mean.... not when you're calling for emergency help). In some places in the USA, you have to invoke your right to remain silent (as in you have to literally say, "I invoke my right to remain silent") but in other places you simply don't say anything (although, depending on where you live, you may be required to show ID or give them your name). A lawyer is much better at talking to the police on your behalf (and knows how to deal with them) better than you. For more information, I suggest you watch the lecture entitled "Don't Talk to the Police" by Professor James Duane or visit the ACLU's website and search for "Know You Rights."

NOTE: I'm NOT a lawyer; please don't misconstrue this as legal advice.

I think that is terrible advice. I've talked to the police many times without any troubles. Just try not to let them intimidate you. They are there to help. Use them and help them.

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I love to watch tv cop shows. Not "COPS" but things like CSI, Law & Order, etc.

What I don't like is that too many people who DO watch these shows are now experts in the law.

Here is a good guideline on what to do if questioned by the police or asked about a search.

Information on your "Miranda Rights"

Nibs

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I talked to a real csi here in walmart. She said that csi was pretty close to reality. Which makes since because the writer for the origanal show was a csi.

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