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NatureBoff

Light Aircraft Engine Fail Nosedives Mystery

96 posts in this topic

This video shows a light aircraft which loses it's single engine power at a height of around 200ft after take-off. He lands without serious injury. So why are so many light aircraft crashes appear to have the pilot unconscious/confused and pushing forward on the stick?

Here's just the latest. Small plane crashes on takeoff at Fallbrook Airpark, 1 minor injury reported. There was another bad crash at the same airport on Mar05 2012, with a major injury. I've come across ten to twenty such nose into the ground bad crashes in some earlier research I did. These unfortunate incident mysteries are likely to be on the rise imo.

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How do you know he pushed forward on the stick? When did he do that?

Have you considered starting a thread about why there are automobile accidents?

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Because some pilots are lucky and some aren't.

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How do you know he pushed forward on the stick? When did he do that?

I used the phrase loosely because I have read many cases of such nosedive accidents in the past. I'm not saying it definitely applies in this case. It's the fact that experienced pilots can generally land in good conditions without any problem, whether at night or not. So why would the onset of darkness cause the accident. It doesn't really make sense.

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Because some pilots are lucky and some aren't.

That's the statement of someone who isn't scientfically minded and doesn't have any experience of flying what-so-ever.

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I used the phrase loosely because I have read many cases of such nosedive accidents in the past. I'm not saying it definitely applies in this case. It's the fact that experienced pilots can generally land in good conditions without any problem, whether at night or not. So why would the onset of darkness cause the accident. It doesn't really make sense.

Because you can't see.

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That's the statement of someone who isn't scientfically minded and doesn't have any experience of flying what-so-ever.

Someone who posts the kind of stuff you post commenting on someone not being scientifically minded - now that's funny.

How many hours of stick time do you have?

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so do you just see any plane crash as an excuse to advance your pet theory?

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Someone who posts the kind of stuff you post commenting on someone not being scientifically minded - now that's funny.

How many hours of stick time do you have?

Good one

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so do you just see any plane crash as an excuse to advance your pet theory?

No, I look at as many as I can to see a possible link. Of course, a lot of light aircraft plane crashes don't fit this hypothesis. Many do.

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Posted (edited)

Someone who posts the kind of stuff you post commenting on someone not being scientifically minded - now that's funny.

How many hours of stick time do you have?

I was in the gliding club at the Royal Aircraft Establishment. I was the only person in my class to get a distinction in aerodynamics at college. I saw many Farnborough airshows. My line manager was a former test pilot. I had a career as a Scientific Officer. I worked in a building at the end of the main runway and as a specially trained first aider, in the unfortunate event of a crash, it was my responsibility to run onto the runway and divert people away from spilt aviation fuel. I didn't even achieve solo flight ability, but that's beside the point, I have hundreds of take-offs and landings as first-hand experience. I'm more credible than just about anyone on this subject. If anyone has this experience combined with technical research, then I'd love to hear it. Edited by RingFenceTheCity

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my dear source of credibility: i followed some of your posts, but still i wasn't able to make any sense of all that. all i got is that you attribute random failure of machinery with something that appears to be a fixed idea of yours and then flaming people that doubt you.

Help me out man, what is your point????

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I was in the gliding club at the Royal Aircraft Establishment. I was the only person in my class to get a distinction in aerodynamics at college. I saw many Farnborough airshows. My line manager was a former test pilot. I had a career as a Scientific Officer. I worked in a building at the end of the main runway and as a specially trained first aider, in the unfortunate event of a crash, it was my responsibility to run onto the runway and divert people away from spilt aviation fuel. I didn't even achieve solo flight ability, but that's beside the point, I have hundreds of take-offs and landings as first-hand experience. I'm more credible than just about anyone on this subject. If anyone has this experience combined with technical research, then I'd love to hear it.

Then why do you display such a lack of understanding about aircraft, how they work, and in some cases how they don't?

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The top video shows the plane lose power, he turns left slightly and sees nothing but trees and water, so he turns right and aims for the clearing. He clearly is using back elevator in an attempt to keep the plane in the air as seen in the side view camera. Just look at the elevator. He has it pulled back.

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Posted (edited)

The top video shows the plane lose power, he turns left slightly and sees nothing but trees and water, so he turns right and aims for the clearing. He clearly is using back elevator in an attempt to keep the plane in the air as seen in the side view camera. Just look at the elevator. He has it pulled back.

The left turn, loss of engine power are the same initial conditions as the latest 777 crash at SFO. It's the same as the 2004 incident at Sharm-el-sheik. It's hauntingly similar to the Afghan cargo plane crash. [The statue at the Manchester Museum is turning left]. There's something going on here. Edited by NatureBoff

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my dear source of credibility: i followed some of your posts, but still i wasn't able to make any sense of all that. all i got is that you attribute random failure of machinery with something that appears to be a fixed idea of yours and then flaming people that doubt you.

Help me out man, what is your point????

The left turn, loss of engine power are the same initial conditions as the latest 777 crash at SFO. It's the same as the 2004 incident at Sharm-el-sheik. It's hauntingly similar to the Afghan cargo plane crash. [The statue at the Manchester Museum is turning left]. There's something going on here. The sudden opposite turn can be due to pilot natural confusion and compensation until the narrow beam is passed or dissipates.

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The left turn, loss of engine power are the same initial conditions as the latest 777 crash at SFO. It's the same as the 2004 incident at Sharm-el-sheik. It's hauntingly similar to the Afghan cargo plane crash. [The statue at the Manchester Museum is turning left]. There's something going on here. The sudden opposite turn can be due to pilot natural confusion and compensation until the narrow beam is passed or dissipates.

Just no :td:

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Posted (edited)

A hyrax hijacked the plane.

Edit: With the help of a lizard bird.

Edited by Rlyeh
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Posted (edited)

It's not only planes that have a mystery lateral diversion to the left:

Bestival coach crash which killed teen Michael Molloy and two others was caused by '20-year-old tyre blow out'

The driver Colin Daulby battled to control the 52-seat coach as it headed north on the A3 in Surrey from the Bestival music festival on the Isle of Wight.

But he also died in the crash when the blow-out on the front nearside tyre made the coach veer left, mount the embankment, crash through a fence and into the tree.

Another One! Dozens injured after bus carrying college students crashes in Kentucky (Jun 11 2013)

The Courier-Journal's website showed video of the crash. A dashboard camera from a truck showed the bus suddenly veering left across three lanes of traffic and hitting a concrete median, leaving a trail of debris in the roadway.

A third one?! Police searching for box truck that caused school bus crash (May 2013)

Five kids with special needs and seven adults were on their way back north to Lafayette when a box truck started coming over into the left lane. It forced the bus driver, Audrey Kithcel, 55, of Lafayette, to veer left.

“The bus made an evasive maneuver to the left to miss from getting hit,” said Sgt. Rich Myers from the Indiana State Police. “It is very amazing for a bus to flip over like that and the kids and the adults came out with non-life threatening injuries.”

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Edited by NatureBoff

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There's more coach crashes which initially veered to the left:

Bus Crash That Killed Pregnant Coach And Driver Is Being Investigated (Mar 18 2013)

The bus came to a stop upright on the side of the road with part of its left side shorn off, photos from the scene showed, though it's unclear whether that was from the impact or rescue operation.

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Posted (edited)

Give it up NatureBoff... I am rated on Harrier from my years of designing (member of the team) and implementing the Harrier Simulator at RNAS Yeovilton Pretty sure my rating lapsed a couple of decades ago) . You dont even have a PPL so basically you are talking from somewhere, where the sun doesn't shine!

There are plenty of people on this site with extensive recent experience of flying everything from a Cessna Pup to modern commercial airliners and beyond.

I take part, regularly, in Air Incident Investigations ( as an Aeronautical and Functional Safety Engineer (flight)) and nothing you say makes any sense at all. Do you never go to the source for the reports on Air Accidents (rhetorical, because Iknow the answer) as all air incidents are investigated.

You might also want to look up HMI (Human Machine Interface) data to find out why sometimes people veer left, and sometimes people veer right prior to an accident.

Give it up or tell us what you base your beliefs on - goodness only knows that I have asked you to do this numerous times, because all I see is a Troll peddling his own unsubstantiated beliefs. :yes:

Edited by keithisco
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Do you even read what you post FOOL. If the left side is sheared then it is a good indicator that the coach veered to the RIGHT.

If it veered left then it's more likely it's left side would strike a boundary wall etc.

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