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Macroramphosis

Hagan Sea Monster

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Jay Cooney has written a fascinating and credible account of both the discovery and a possible identification of the Hagan sea monster - a 10' carcass that was washed ashore in California in 1978. You can read the full report here :

http://bizarrezoolog...ination-of.html

Quite apart from the article and the information therein, I personally found his explanation of why a large marine animal could remain undiscovered for so long an intriguing one with the examples he gives. Of interest is the fact that this explanation is for an air-breathing animal, which theoretically has a "right to be seen, which bodes well for the discovery of other large animals that might not be air breathers............

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Interesting. Although I have to say that the fact the whole thing relies on the almost 40-year-old recollection of Mrs. Hagan and that the creature as described has so many similarities to known creatures makes the hypothesis a little questionable in my book.

And while I think we are all in agreement that there are most certainly unknown sea creatures, it would be tough for an ocean going mammal to stay hidden.

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There is naturally the possibility that it was a unknown (or more unlikely a prehistoric) cetacean, but we can't safely exclude a more recent cetacean. The problem is that just while we can't explain some described features, we can't say its not possible that its a modern cetacean. The Ataka-Globster was described as having tusks and "no eyes". No features of a whale, but it was a whale. Trunko was described as having a lobster-like tail, a trunk and fur. No features of a whale, but it was a whale. The Son of Trunko was described as giant lizard with fur. No features of a whale, but it was a whale. The Santa Cruz carcass was described as having elephantine legs with toenails and a duckbill. No features of a whale, but it was a whale. I think it was Ben Speers-Roesch who noted that we only knew two kind of Globster: those for which enough evidence is available to identify them and those for which not enough evidence is available to identify them. In first case every Globster turned out as cetacean, shark, oarfish or other known recent animals. So until new information will be uncovered this story will become another unsolved riddle in cryptozoology.

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There is naturally the possibility that it was a unknown (or more unlikely a prehistoric) cetacean, but we can't safely exclude a more recent cetacean. The problem is that just while we can't explain some described features, we can't say its not possible that its a modern cetacean. The Ataka-Globster was described as having tusks and "no eyes". No features of a whale, but it was a whale. Trunko was described as having a lobster-like tail, a trunk and fur. No features of a whale, but it was a whale. The Son of Trunko was described as giant lizard with fur. No features of a whale, but it was a whale. The Santa Cruz carcass was described as having elephantine legs with toenails and a duckbill. No features of a whale, but it was a whale. I think it was Ben Speers-Roesch who noted that we only knew two kind of Globster: those for which enough evidence is available to identify them and those for which not enough evidence is available to identify them. In first case every Globster turned out as cetacean, shark, oarfish or other known recent animals. So until new information will be uncovered this story will become another unsolved riddle in cryptozoology.

Agreed.

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