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Still Waters

Hummingbirds on the brink of extinction

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Hummingbirds are tiny, iridescent powerhouses. But some species are catastrophically rare: we need to work to save them, says poet Ruth Padel.

There are more than 300 species: words such as emerald, copper, bronze, gold, fire, sapphire, lazuline, emerald and sunbeam spill like Aladdin’s treasure through the list: amethyst woodstar, blue-headed sapphire, Brazilian ruby, buff-winged starfrontlet – you marvel not only at nature’s capacity for spangly variation but the human urge to match it in language.

http://www.telegraph...extinction.html

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Whenever I see stories about endangered species, I want to know why. Usually you don't have to look too far, and it's always the same ultimate cause. From the article;

"In the Seventies and Eighties, as wild habitats shrank and wild species began to disappear, zoos that took their role in society seriously realised their raison d’être had to be conservation. Now, as human populations explode, forests vanish and the integrity of the planet’s biological systems is under threat, modern zoos are a vital part of the conservation toolkit."

So, let's build more zoos to make sure we have a few species representatives around. As for our species, apparently there are no limits to growth.

/sigh

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That's so sad that hummingbirds are going away in some places.

We get lots of hummingbirds here, among a ton of other birds. I do what I can to keep them all happy. I have a large swath of my yard that I leave wild that I call the sanctuary. Through the year I save up my dryer lint and natural fiber fabric scraps and yarns, threads, and such and early to mid spring I scatter the nesting materials around the sanctuary. I also save eggshells, and some of them get ground up and put out for bird grit and calcium to help shell formation. Currently I make up hummingbird nectar in half gallon batches to fill all the feeders.

We are lucky to live in a pocket of very healthy ecosystem... If the amount of hummingbirds I see at the feeders are any indication, I'm doing a good job helping it stay that way :)

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Hummingbirds will die when flowers will die

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We don't have hummingbirds in this country and I love the wee things, so sweet and delicate looking.

I came across another article earlier today, it has some interesting pics in it:

http://www.dailymail...doesnt-win.html

I'd love to see hummingbirds in my garden :wub:

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We have a hummingbird feeder but haven't seen a single hummingbird this year and worse, the food is untouched. :(

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We have a hummingbird feeder but haven't seen a single hummingbird this year and worse, the food is untouched. :(

Aww...that doesn't sound too good :(

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We have a hummingbird feeder but haven't seen a single hummingbird this year and worse, the food is untouched. :(

How long has that nectar been out? Sugarwater can turn pretty fast, especially when it's hot out, and hummingbirds tend to shun bad nectar. You might try giving the feeder a good scrubdown and making a fresh batch of sugarwater to see if that helps attract them.

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I didn't get a feeder out this year. I haven't seen any hummers either.

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I fed them last year but haven't this year, I should. I love to watch them and there's nothing like a hummingbird going around looking in your windows because the feeder is empty. Also had them follow me in the house while I filled the feeder.

There are lots of them here but in some areas there aren't many at all. South of here about 50 miles they don't have any and I think it might have something to do with crop dusting, farming country, and loss of habitat.

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How long has that nectar been out? Sugarwater can turn pretty fast, especially when it's hot out, and hummingbirds tend to shun bad nectar. You might try giving the feeder a good scrubdown and making a fresh batch of sugarwater to see if that helps attract them.

No the sugar water won't last long. Even if they don't drink it you have to give them fresh and be sure to keep it clean.

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I hate to hear things like this. We see a few hummingbirds ,around my wife's wild flower garden, and here and there. There are several birds that i don't see or hear anymore though.

Wippoorwills , i haven't heard those in years .

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