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shrooma

Quantum Breakthrough:

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Scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute have made a breakthrough in the next step towards long-distance Quantum Communications-

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http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-06/uoc--qtb060613.php

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the boffins in Copenhagen have managed to teleport information between clouds of gas, not light or light-to-gas as before, and furthermore, are able to do it every single time they do it.

Although the distance involved is only half a meter, they say that (with funding) they're confident they could teleport information at satellite-like distances, ushering in a new age of communication technology.

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To who it may concern:

I've just read this article Quantum teleportation between atomic systems over long distances and noticed that the element used is Caesium, another Alkali metal like Lithium.

"Teleportation" is a misnomer because mainstream science doesn't incorporate the concept of gravitons imv. Do you see how this is very comparable to the proposed new-physics and the Li-ion battery problem in 787s?

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That should tick off the NSA - Quantum bits (QuBits) are un-hackable (think I may have just made that word up :whistle: )

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Cool stuff! I am impressed that this was all done at room temperature.

For those interested in reading further, the published article is here and a free preprint can be found here.

I've just read this article Quantum teleportation between atomic systems over long distances and noticed that the element used is Caesium, another Alkali metal like Lithium.

Alkali metals (especially caesium and rubidium) are often used in this sort of research because they have very simple electron configurations; namely only a single valence electron.

It is easy to excite gasses of these atoms into Rydberg states (even at room temperature), making the quantum mechanical description of these systems relatively simple. (Indeed, it seems like the authors of the paper used a laser to excite the 6s valence electron in caesium to a 7p state.)

On the other hand, lithium is used in Li-ion batteries because lithium is the 3rd smallest atom available, and therefore it is relatively easy to move Li ions through a solid material.

(Helium is easy to move as well, but it barely reacts chemically so there is no point. H is tricky to move because it is a little bit too chemically reactive. Lithium is basically the best choice for efficient ion transport.)

"Teleportation" is a misnomer because mainstream science doesn't incorporate the concept of gravitons imv.

Gravitons are almost completely irrelevant, since gravity has a negligible effect on these systems.

Do you see how this is very comparable to the proposed new-physics and the Li-ion battery problem in 787s?

Since the reasons for using caesium in this situation and lithium in Li-ion batteries is totally different, no, I don't see how they are comparable.

That should tick off the NSA - Quantum bits (QuBits) are un-hackable (think I may have just made that word up :whistle: )

Unfortunately the NSA probably has direct access to the satellite/cell tower/whatever. So your transmissions may be un-hackable (its a good word), but unless you are communicating directly with your anarchist/terrorist/freedom-hating buddies (just kidding) I imagine your data will be intercepted at the routing station.

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