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Waspie_Dwarf

Nasa tests 3D-printed engine part

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Nasa tests 3D-printed rocket engine fuel injector

Nasa has announced it has successfully tested a 3D-printed rocket engine part.

The US space agency said that the injector component could be made more quickly and cheaply using the technique.

The part is used to deliver liquid oxygen and hydrogen gas to an engine's combustion chamber.

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Hot-Fire Tests Show 3-D Printed Rocket Parts Rival Traditionally Manufactured Parts

What can survive blazing temperatures of almost 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit without melting? What did not break apart at extreme pressures? What is made by a new process that forms a complex part in just one piece? What takes less than three weeks to go from manufacturing to testing? What can reduce the costs of expensive rocket parts by 60 percent or more?

Answer: 3-D printed parts

Engineers know that 3-D printed rocket parts have the potential to save NASA and industry money and to open up new affordable design possibilities for rockets and spacecraft. But until recently, no one had tested rocket parts critical to engine combustion in a hot-fire environment.

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Test Firing Go Pro Video

Watch a video that puts you in the test stand. This video gives you a blazing view of the one of the first tests of a 3-D printed rocket injector on June 27, 2013, in Test Stand 115 at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Propulsion engineers used the tests to compare the performance of a 3-D printed rocket injector to an injector made with multiple parts and traditional welds. During the extreme temperatures and pressures of the hot firing, the 3-D printed part performed as well as the traditionally manufactured part. This test included a 3-D printed liner.

Credit: NASA/MSFC

Source: NASA/Marshall - Multimedia

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NASA Tests Limits of 3-D Printing with Powerful Rocket Engine Check

The largest 3-D printed rocket engine component NASA ever has tested blazed to life Thursday, Aug. 22 during an engine firing that generated a record 20,000 pounds of thrust.

This test is a milestone for one of many important advances the agency is making to reduce the cost of space hardware. Innovations like additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, foster new and more cost-effective capabilities in the U.S. space industry.

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Printing Rocket Engine Parts

Watch this video to learn how NASA engineers designed and tested a large 3-D printed rocket engine part.

Credit: NASA/MSFC

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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3-D Printed Injector Roars to Life

A 3-D printed injector roars to life on a test stand at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The injector fabricated with a technique called 3-D printing, or additive manufacturing, produced a record 20,000 pounds of thrust and was the largest rocket engine part of its kind tested by NASA to date.

Credit: NASA/MSFC

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Am I the only one completely amazed by 3-d printers? I think I know how my grandfather felt when he first saw horseless carriages.

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Am I the only one completely amazed by 3-d printers? I think I know how my grandfather felt when he first saw horseless carriages.

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

- Arthur C. Clarke's Third Law

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