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Fossil Cave. Australia's ancient mega fauna.

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I saw this on 60 Minutes the other night. A cave in Australia's Outback with many well preserved fossils inside.

Video in link for anyone interested.

http://sixtyminutes.ninemsn.com.au/videoindex.aspx

The Nullarbor Plain is famous for its emptiness. But that wasn't always the case. More than 50,000 years ago they resembled the plains of Africa. Giant creatures roamed the outback - scientists call them mega fauna.

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That cave is incredible. What i wouldn't give to see those enormous creatures in the flesh... Preferably in an armoured car, lol. Nice post.

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I saw this on 60 Minutes the other night. A cave in Australia's Outback with many well preserved fossils inside.

Video in link for anyone interested.

http://sixtyminutes.ninemsn.com.au/videoindex.aspx

The Nullarbor Plain is famous for its emptiness. But that wasn't always the case. More than 50,000 years ago they resembled the plains of Africa. Giant creatures roamed the outback - scientists call them mega fauna.

How did they get so big during an ice age when it's not supposed to be ideal for vegetation to thrive due to the extreme cold and aridity?

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How did they get so big during an ice age when it's not supposed to be ideal for vegetation to thrive due to the extreme cold and aridity?

I'm not too sure. I'm looking online now, but I think the Northern Hemisphere was more affected by the last Ice Age.

I'm glad to see a decent question out of you for once. :)

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Sorry link at top got mixed up. Cycles through different videos over time.

Here's the correct link:

http://sixtyminutes.ninemsn.com.au/video/?videoid=0599c7e8-73c7-4f89-bdf4-99de253e52aa&src=v5%3Apause%3Atwitter%3Auuids&from=sharepermalink-twitter

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Posted (edited)

I'm not too sure. I'm looking online now, but I think the Northern Hemisphere was more affected by the last Ice Age.

I'm glad to see a decent question out of you for once. :)

South America similarly had mega fauna. There was giant spider monkey skeletons found in the Niah cave system. The same enigma as the mega-wombats discovered in Oz. Both are fruit eating types from the tops of the trees. Connection?

Bones of giant tree-wombat unearthed

Edited by NatureBoff

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South America similarly had mega fauna. There was giant spider monkey skeletons found in the Niah cave system. The same enigma as the mega-wombats discovered in Oz. Both are fruit eating types from the tops of the trees. Connection?

Bones of giant tree-wombat unearthed

Not sure of any connection. There used to be a lot of carnivorous ground dwelling mega fauna in Australia too. Same goes for South America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_megafauna#Extinct_Australian_megafauna

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleistocene_megafauna#South_America

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Not sure of any connection. There used to be a lot of carnivorous ground dwelling mega fauna in Australia too. Same goes for South America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_megafauna#Extinct_Australian_megafauna

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleistocene_megafauna#South_America

So what's you're answer to the ice age mega-fauna conundrum in general then?

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So what's you're answer to the ice age mega-fauna conundrum in general then?

I haven't looked into that too much to be honest. In Australia the general consensus is humans hunted them to extinction when they arrived at roughly the same time. Plus the centre of Australia drying out.

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I haven't looked into that too much to be honest. In Australia the general consensus is humans hunted them to extinction when they arrived at roughly the same time. Plus the centre of Australia drying out.

Ummm. Humans arriving doesn't explain why they existed in so many numbers and so large in size in the first place does it? Same issue with desertification of the central regions.

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Ummm. Humans arriving doesn't explain why they existed in so many numbers and so large in size in the first place does it? Same issue with desertification of the central regions.

I guess not. I didn't realise we were talking about that. I have no idea.

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I guess not. I didn't realise we were talking about that. I have no idea.

Thanks for the admission. I have an idea that an increase in tidal strength would create the conditions necessary. Nutrients would be brought up from the bottom, completely changing the biology of the ocean surfaces. More tidal strength means more energy in the ocean systems. More heavy rain systems that would extend further into the continents, although infrequently. Less cloud cover in general leading to an increase in sunshine reaching the surface. Something like that anyway.

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