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Still Waters

The Hum, a Worldwide Acoustic Mystery,

40 posts in this topic

It creeps in slowly in the dark of night, and once inside, it almost never goes away.

It's known as the Hum, a steady, droning sound that's heard in places as disparate as Taos, N.M.; Bristol, England; and Largs, Scotland.

But what causes the Hum, and why it only affects a small percentage of the population in certain areas, remain a mystery, despite a number of scientific investigations.

http://www.livescien...y-taos-hum.html

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Funny, I was thinking about this the other day. Are we any closer to knowing what causes this phenomenon?

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The more i study the paranormal the more convinced I become that there is alot going on underneath our feet that the citizenry have no knowledge of.

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Posted (edited)

We have a similar issue in Seattle. it's called the "West Seattle Hum" People have been hearing it for years and it's LOUD. Some believe it's coming from the concrete plant and the giant hoppers they use for mixing, but it remains unclear if that really is the source. They aren't sure it's the plant because the noise is being heard clearly by people several miles away from the plant... too far away to be realistically coming from the plant. The other problem is that the concrete plant has been there for decades doing their thing, and the Hum is random and can sometimes go away for a couple of years at a time, then return for a few weeks, then fall silent again.

Apparently the concrete plant did install silencers on their hoppers, but the noise is still being heard randomly.

There's also a theory that it could be midshipman fish which have a very strange mating call. Some scientists think it's possible the call is being amplified by the hulls of the cargo ships docked in the nearby port. I think that's fairly far fetched, but apparently they're looking into that.

http://www.kplu.org/...t-seattle-night

Edited by MissMelsWell
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hmmmm

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I live in Bristol where this is has been quite often reported. I don't think I've ever heard it myself, but I know a few who say they have, and that it has sometimes driven them half-mad when they're trying to sleep. I have no idea what to make of it though, the only thing I hear at night (apart from the local owls hooting), is the low, distant sound of the city's traffic, but apparently this is something quite different from that.

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hmmmm

Does Monica Lewinski figure in this somehow?

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Posted (edited)

I still think its the ices, these sounds only started being heard when the ices started breaking up in the artics. The earth can make wried sounds in vibration when it makes big changes.

Edited by docyabut2

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Heart FM in London played the noise a few hours ago and asked listeners to tell them if they heard it....lots said yes but most people heard nothing, only silence.

I didn't listen to it myself, somebody told me about it and I was wondering if anybody here did.

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So this is like mosquito tones? Only certain people have the physical ability to perceive them?

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If that's a bigfoot mating hum, we'll never find the source.

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Sound travels through water (oceans) and rock Much more easily than through air . I would expect the source might be Mechanical (highways?, earth movement, Ice movement?, machines?) But since people seem to be inferring that it is a higher frequency hummmm ? Maybe the cause is Electrical ? (some sort of resonances created by man made electrical activities?)

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I'm more interested in why only some people can hear it. In case you aren't familiar, mosquito tones are tones that are at a frequency just outside the range of the average adult. Children and teenagers can hear them as clear as day. Kids were using mosquito tones on their phones so they could get text message alerts in class without the teacher knowing.

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Our son used to be able to tell if the TV was still on, when no one else could hear it. "Don't you hear that?" "Hear what?"

It would drive him crazy.

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Posted (edited)

Reminds of what's going on in Taos city.

[media=]

[/media] Edited by MrBene

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Our son used to be able to tell if the TV was still on, when no one else could hear it. "Don't you hear that?" "Hear what?"

It would drive him crazy.

Like your son, I'm usually able to tell if the TV is still on or not, even if I'm in a different room. So, because of the distance or the obstacles, I can't be able to hear the TV sounds, but I hear this noise. It's not related to TV speakers, it can be set on "mute" and I still hear it (on some TV's when on mute it's even more intense).

I've noticed that it "works" both with old cathodic TV's and with LCD's.

When I was young, coming back from school, I usually could tell if someone was home when I was still coming up the stairs, because I could hear the TV noise. It was very usefull.

I think it's related to the image/data transmission on the screen. Since the noise has a very low frequency, it's easier (for who can) to be picked, since it can pass through or around objects more easilly.

So it's nothing special, only a good hearing.

Can I ask you why did you use the past describing what your son was able to do? Isn't he able to do it now?

I'm more interested in why only some people can hear it. In case you aren't familiar, mosquito tones are tones that are at a frequency just outside the range of the average adult. Children and teenagers can hear them as clear as day. Kids were using mosquito tones on their phones so they could get text message alerts in class without the teacher knowing.

Ahahah, I didn't know about it, I have to say that's brilliant!

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The earth makes her own music. Perhaps that is what it is. Or maybe it's those new smart meters, since most people hear this at night inside their homes.

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There was a documentary about the Hum were they took this guy down an old mine several hundred feet down.

He said he heard the sound even louder down there.

It's like they are hearing the core of the earth rotating or something. They use to blame the US Navy and their low-freq submarine communication device, but I dont know if they either confirmed or dismissed that now. It was a few years back I heard of it.

Here is the clip with the guy who went down the mine.

http://youtu.be/-cHdv9esjBk

more clips about The Hum>>

http://youtu.be/B7KBc-hKY5A

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more Hum>>>

[media=]

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Can I ask you why did you use the past describing what your son was able to do? Isn't he able to do it now?

He's in his mid-20's and hasn't lived with us for quite a while, so I don't know if he still can or not. He could up through his teen years though.

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The earth makes her own music. Perhaps that is what it is. Or maybe it's those new smart meters, since most people hear this at night inside their homes.

Here is earth making music. Sounds like dolphins or whales. Might be this all whales are responding to, Mother Earth "talking" to them.

http://youtu.be/QVJwq3mH7so

'Chorus', also known as 'dawn chorus', are naturally occurring electromagnetic radio wave/s emitted from the Earth’s magnetosphere that are audible by the human ear. These radio waves are caused by particles within Earth's magnetosphere.

The chorus phenomena has been known about for decades. The reason they are sometimes referred to as 'dawn chorus' is because often the sounds are more easily picked up in the morning. A similar occurence is the auroral chorus - which can occur during auroras - caused by geomagnetic storms.

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It creeps in slowly in the dark of night, and once inside, it almost never goes away.

It's known as the Hum, a steady, droning sound that's heard in places as disparate as Taos, N.M.; Bristol, England; and Largs, Scotland.

But what causes the Hum, and why it only affects a small percentage of the population in certain areas, remain a mystery, despite a number of scientific investigations.

http://www.livescien...y-taos-hum.html

I liked this explanation the most:
Environmental factors have also been blamed, including seismic activity such as microseisms — very faint, low-frequency earth tremors that can be generated by the action of ocean waves.
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Elljay, that is beautiful! Thank you for posting the link. The earth's song is so wonderful and I wouldn't be surprised if the whales are singing back to her. They seem very wise to me.

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When was H.A.A.R.P developed? because I think that may have a place in these hums

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