Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
Still Waters

Swarm Of Bees Attacks Couple And Kills Horses

14 posts in this topic

A couple exercising their two miniature horses have been attacked by a swarm of around 30,000 bees, stinging the animals so many times that they died.

Kristen Beauregard, 44, was stung about 200 times and her boyfriend around 50 times as the insects chased and followed them in Pantego, north Texas.

She said they were sweeping up "piles and piles" of bees and "it was like a bad movie".

http://uk.news.yahoo...40.html#OkcOXH5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that is horrible.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's just nature: kill or be killed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And people wonder why I have a phobia of Bees, or bee like creatures?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Sounds like a Killer Bees movie.

Edited by Ever After

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very likely these are Africanized bees. What ever genius thought it was a good idea to bring extremely aggressive wild African bees to South America has cost hundreds of lives and pushed out many native New World bee species. There dreams of greater honey production have instead turned into a nightmare of dangerous, highly mobile insects that attack anything that gives off CO2. Tests have shown that you can walk up to a hive if you have a breathing tube; the minute you exhale near the nest the go nuts, probably a defense against African predators like the Honey Badger. It took only a few decade for then to colonize all of South and Central America and work their way into souther North America. Stowaways on ships may eventually spread them to the Caribbean as well, if they are not already there.

On the other hand domestic bees are in trouble form Colony Collapse Disease, a malady of unknown origin and possible multiple causes from fungi to insecticide contamination; we may have to learn to use and live with these aggressive bees for pollination of our food crops. A dangerous catch-22 to be sure.

Feel bad for the horses, they did not have any idea what was attacking them. They could have outrun the swarm if they had not been in a pen.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple exercising their two miniature horses have been attacked by a swarm of around 30,000 bees, stinging the animals so many times that they died.

Kristen Beauregard, 44, was stung about 200 times and her boyfriend around 50 times as the insects chased and followed them in Pantego, north Texas.

She said they were sweeping up "piles and piles" of bees and "it was like a bad movie".

http://uk.news.yahoo...40.html#OkcOXH5

Looks like the boyfriend could run faster. Only 50 sticgs campared to 200 for her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's un "bee"-lievable. Whomp whomp. :w00t:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those poor horses...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was very impressed till I read "minature horses". Still it is a tragedy. It is amazing how they don't give up, even when the people are underwater.

Maybe we need to import some Honey Badgers??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor horse! Thankfully over here, our bees tend to be rather more tame, but if global warming is true, and the temps here rise, I fear that more of these kind of species could make a home here, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's extremely unfortunate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those poor horses, that's hideous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.