Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2
Big Bad Voodoo

Teotihuacan mystery

25 posts in this topic

Teotihuacan people used 30 cm thick layer of Mica from Brasil. Mica was used on an inner layer of the pyramid of Sun where it couldnt be seen. Mica is stable when exposed to electricity, light, moisture, and extreme temperatures. Now why is Mica so important to travel thousands of km? Light or electricity perhaps?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I wonder if it might have been used to transfer SUN Light into interior parts of the pyramid? Can anyone verify that an interior chamber exists .. with a Mica Ceiling?

* http://teotihuacanpyramids.blogspot.com

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=109576&st=0

^ short UM thread about Mica Chambers

Edited by lightly
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Lightly in thread you provide no where says thats Mica layer hidden. No why would one hide decoration? No sense at all.

Edited by Melo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teotihuacan people used 30 cm thick layer of Mica from Brasil. Mica was used on an inner layer of the pyramid of Sun where it couldnt be seen. Mica is stable when exposed to electricity, light, moisture, and extreme temperatures. Now why is Mica so important to travel thousands of km? Light or electricity perhaps?

...or it's bright and shiny and fun to look at and does not naturally occur near the city?

It's been a while since I've seen such a cheap shot to build up mystery where none is inherently.

--Jaylemurph

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...or it's bright and shiny and fun to look at and does not naturally occur near the city?

It's been a while since I've seen such a cheap shot to build up mystery where none is inherently.

--Jaylemurph

But its hidden in pyramid. Not visible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But its hidden in pyramid. Not visible.

Bright and shiny for god(s) to look at.

--Jaylemurph

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Large deposits of Mica are found in New Mexico.

http://newmexicooutd..._Mine_Peak.html

http://findermaker.b...-mines-and.html

And it is only about 1000 miles from Mexico City, whereas Brazil is 2 to 2 1/2 times as far.

What makes you think this is Brazilian mica?

I tend to agree with Jayle, that the mica was probably a decoration for the Gods. Or, maybe it was once an exterior decoration that got paved over. Those pyramids are built of hundreds of layers. Each generation adding a new layer of stone and decorations over what previous generations had done.

Edit: The pieces look comparable to those found currently in New Mexico.

http://www.ancientmysteries.eu/mysteries/mexico-teotihuacan/Mysterie-Teotihuacan.html

(see picture in lower right corner) (it is too big to post here)

Edited by DieChecker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lightly in thread you provide no where says thats Mica layer hidden.8a4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would be interesting to know what they were thinking. But that's impossible, of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Die and Jay, you cant be serious. They did it for Gods. And why they didnt use something different for Gods? And why only in Temple of Sun?

Edited by Melo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And most importantly why 30 cm and not 5cm if is for decoration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally thought to be about absorbing the solar energy that was harnessed for feats such as building the things in the first place. Mica is used as a resistance plate to contain energy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Die and Jay, you cant be serious. They did it for Gods. And why they didnt use something different for Gods? And why only in Temple of Sun?

Why only the Pyramid of the Sun? Probably because it was Hard to Get.... expensive in resources.

It was a Temple, right? So what is hard about the belief that the decoration is for the Gods' benefit? We decorate churches with stained glass and all kinds of iconography, partly to remind people of events and partly to decorate the structure so it is pleasing to the Lord. Do you propose that all temple/pyramid decorations were non-religious?

And most importantly why 30 cm and not 5cm if is for decoration.

Because that is how much they brought to the site. If you have 20,000 bricks to build a patio, you don't just throw the last 8,000 of them away when you are done, you use them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Die and Jay, you cant be serious. They did it for Gods. And why they didnt use something different for Gods? And why only in Temple of Sun?

Die beat me to this.

But I concede the point that bringing logic and reason to this thread is an unfair contribution, and I can see why it would give rise to consternation. It's the equivalent of Die and I bringing guns to a knife fight.

--Jaylemurph

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Die beat me to this.

But I concede the point that bringing logic and reason to this thread is an unfair contribution, and I can see why it would give rise to consternation. It's the equivalent of Die and I bringing guns to a knife fight.

--Jaylemurph

You get the "Bazooka of Logic" and I'll use the "Flamethrower of Reason".

Edited by DieChecker
4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teotihuacan people used 30 cm thick layer of Mica from Brasil. Mica was used on an inner layer of the pyramid of Sun where it couldnt be seen. Mica is stable when exposed to electricity, light, moisture, and extreme temperatures. Now why is Mica so important to travel thousands of km? Light or electricity perhaps?

How short everyone's memories are!

The mica came from Oaxaca, which is practically in Teotihuacan's back yard.

All explained here.

Name of the place here.

Somewhere, maybe at another forum, I posted a quote of the shipping statistiocs of the mica mined there sometime (I believe) in the mid 20th century. I hope no one minds if I don't go searching for that again.

The mine was operational for years and was there before the Europeans.

Generally thought to be about absorbing the solar energy that was harnessed for feats such as building the things in the first place. Mica is used as a resistance plate to contain energy.

No it's not. It is used as a resistor. It contains nothing. As a good resistor, it prevents the flow of electricity. For this reason, it is used to provide the resistance required in some capacitors, which are devices that store an electric charge. But the mica stores nothing.

Harte

Edited by Harte
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that mica has some amazingly useful properties.

For example:

Sheet mica is used in electrical components, electronics, isinglass, and atomic force microscopy. Other uses include diaphragms for oxygen-breathing equipment, marker dials for navigation compasses, optical filters, pyrometers, thermal regulators, stove and kerosene heater windows, radiation aperture covers for microwave ovens, and micathermic heater elements. Mica is birefringent and is therefore commonly used to make quarter and half wave plates. Specialized applications for sheet mica are found in aerospace components in air-, ground-, and sea-launched missile systems, laser devices, medical electronics and radar systems. Mica is mechanically stable in micrometer-thin sheets which are relatively transparent to radiation (such as alpha particles) while being impervious to most gases. It is therefore used as a window on radiation detectors such as Geiger-Müller tubes.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica

Of course, the ancients would have little to no knowledge of this, and instead likely used more for ceremonial/decorative purposes, as back then it was relatively rare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...or it's bright and shiny and fun to look at and does not naturally occur near the city?

It's been a while since I've seen such a cheap shot to build up mystery where none is inherently.

Really? Hang around on this site a bit...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think traces of mica infused Paint have been found on the Pyramid of the Sun? Later , the Maya used lots of Mica Paint on their temples to make them gleam .

It's still used in paints , and patching compounds.

I still wonder if any portion of the edges of the mica layerS in the Pyramid of the Sun were left exposed? .. to fill the entire layer with SunLight*. I don't know how transparent, translucent, or opaque that mica is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bright and shiny for god(s) to look at.

--Jaylemurph

Absolutely not.

If appeasement was what they were aiming at why not use gold?

Maybe there is more to the idea of pyramids than modern day science has yet to appreciate.

The big clue is in the word. Fire in the middle.

Look no further.

Edited by zoser

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The big clue is in the word. Fire in the middle.

Hi Zoser,

who called pyramids "fire in the middle"?

Big Bad Voodoo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Zoser,

who called pyramids "fire in the middle"?

Big Bad Voodoo

An idiot that likes to play lego linguistics, that's who. It comes from "Pyre" and "amid." Why not look up the etymology of these two words to see their origins?

Harte

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the mica was definitely not for electricity or any other kind of modern technology. they wanted to use a that rock for that reason and thats how it iz. what idiot would believe a stone structure is used for electricity? oh yeah... i know...

a7a.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget that mica is used in spackling.

But seriously, mica has been a decorative material in many cultures. It is easy to cut into shapes. Nubian furniture had mica decorations. Ohio mound builders collected mica from North Carolina.

It's shiny. It's common. What is harder to find are large pieces. Pegmatites can provide huge pieces over 30cm across. Pieces up to 8cm across are not hard to come by. I give pieces like that to schools all of the time because it is fun for the students to separate into sheets they can see through.

To hear that a society collected a lot of this material seems downright normal.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks, when I was putting in a hardwood floor for my daughter, I first put down a layer of garnet paper. Now you could consider this an offering to the "flooring gods" (after all , I was on my knees) but most folks would understand that it was to eliminate the floor boards squeaking under load. Similarly with this pyramid, if the builders wanted to honor or appease their gods, they would carve a story about them in glyphs or create an effigy of them, brilliantly painted or better yet fashioned in gold. A layer of mica says, to me, that it serves some sort of functional purpose,not some bizarre purpose (giant capacitor, etc.) but something practical.

This is just a WAG on my part but I'm going to suggest that the mica layer served the same function as roller bearings do on modern bridges; it was there to mitigate damage from earthquakes or tremors from volcanoes. I have no way of proving this (it would be nice to do a simulation) and if I'm wrong, then some other functional reason for its being there will need to be found.

Ceremonial or religous reasons for something unexplained should be the reason of last resort, not the first thing you think of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.