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Saru

Ancient Egyptian jewellery came from space

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A set of ancient funeral beads discovered in Egypt are made from materials found in a meteorite.

A set of funeral beads which could be the oldest iron artefacts on earth actually came from outer space, archaeologists have claimed.

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That's interesting... I had my misconecpetions on this subject at first, from the title, believing it would be another ludracris theory.

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not surprising.

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Obviously given to the ancients by aliens while they were levitating the pyramids...... :whistle:

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Would that be the infamous Professor Ludracris whose arcane dissertations about mungastectomy and the role hybrid ratmuffoons played in the evolution of slippygrot caused such a stir?

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Supposedly, moldavite is the stone embedded in the Holy grail.

It's no surprise the ancients used materials of extraterrestrial origin

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Obviously given to the ancients by aliens while they were levitating the pyramids...... :whistle:

Exaclty

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The title is a tad misleading!!

lol

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It is a funny title.

Very cool article.

BEADS..... FROM..... SPACE!!!!!..............

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The holy grail is not a cup

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Could be a thousand of years ago Egypt is a site of a big meteor impact.

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Pretty cool--especially the part about the Egyptians having iron smithing abilities earlier than thought.

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is there any metal available for them to use ? as a tool to shape those?

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I guess if they knew it was from space it would've been considered the most valuable and magical metal known to man at the time

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Isn't it supposedly easier to find meteroites in the sands of the Arab Peninsula and the Sahara, since they stand out against the sand? Same thing with meterites in Greenland and Antarctica, supposedly they are easier to find there because they stand out.

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is there any metal available for them to use ? as a tool to shape those?

Well, that's a bit of an interesting question. I am not a professional metallurgist or anything, but I do find it pretty interesting. The thing the article and the abstract of the paper (couldn't get the actual paper, it costs $) seem to think could be quite exciting is that these beads ARE shaped and that might imply they smelted and hot forged the meteorites into sheets that they rolled. This would have introduced the Egyptians to an Iron Age way sooner than is known. The Egyptians were pretty much Copper Age and could make hot forged copper tools of pretty decent complexity and quality at the time these beads came from. The thing is, I am pretty sure they could cold forge the meteorites. Cold forging is basically just hitting (or otherwise applying mechanical force to move ) things into the shape you want, without heating them up to melting or near temperatures, first The metallic meteorites are generally pretty much just iron and nickel already, and the problem with cold forging iron and iron alloys is it makes stuff brittle. But, it's not like it turns it into match sticks, it just makes it too brittle to be effect tools and tools of war. Cold forging small iron alloy meteorites should be doable with copper hammers and anvils. You would dent the crap out of the copper stuff fairly quickly, but I think the process would be faster than some of their stone working techniques.... and we know they were a brilliant and patient people.

edit:

cold working/forging: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_working

forging: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forging

Isn't it supposedly easier to find meteroites in the sands of the Arab Peninsula and the Sahara, since they stand out against the sand? Same thing with meterites in Greenland and Antarctica, supposedly they are easier to find there because they stand out.

That sounds right. The pieces I have seen for sale are usually from Africa/Middle East.

Edited by cacoseraph

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"The fall of meteorites has been interpreted as divine messages by multitudinous cultures since prehistoric times, and meteorites are still adored as heavenly bodies. Stony meteorites were used to carve birds and other works of art; jewelry and knifes were produced of meteoritic iron for instance by the Inuit society. We here present a ~10.6 kg Buddhist sculpture (the ‘iron man’) made of an iron meteorite, which represents a particularity in religious art and meteorite science. The specific contents of the crucial main (Fe, Ni, Co) and trace (Cr, Ga, Ge) elements, indicate an ataxitic iron meteorite with high Ni contents (~16 wt%) and Co (~0.6 wt%) that was used to produce the artefact. Additionally, the platinum group elements (PGEs), as well as the internal PGE ratios, exhibit a meteoritic signature. The geochemical data of the meteorite generally match the element values known from fragments of the Chinga ataxite (ungrouped iron) meteorite strewn field discovered in 1913. The provenance of the meteorite as well as of the piece of art strongly points to the border region of eastern Siberia and Mongolia, accordingly. The sculpture possibly portrays the Buddhist god Vaiœravana and might originate in the Bon culture of the 11th century. However, the ethnological and art historical details of the ‘iron man’ sculpture, as well as the timing of the sculpturing, currently remain speculative."

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The holy grail is not a cup

Nowhere did i say it was a coffee mug or anything else .

Whatever it is ,it has a moldavite embedded in it

Edited by Simbi Laveau

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