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Saru

Astronaut details near-drowning experience

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Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano had been out on a spacewalk when his helmet started to fill with water.

An Italian astronaut who nearly drowned in his helmet during a spacewalk has told of how he felt all alone and frantically tried to come up with a plan to save himself.

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Scary stuff. I wonder what the malfunction was?

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I bet the helmet wasn't the only part of the suit wet.

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Scary stuff. In space no-one can hear you gurgle...

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Oh man I hope this can be resolved so those guys don't have to go trough it again. I understand equipment failure but damn it man they are in a very dangerous situation as it is!

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Yeah, a hell of a thing to go through for sure.

I don't know at all, but I would suspect that the suit will come back to Earth on the very next re-supply mission to be examined.

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Or get them some goldfish.

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I don't know at all, but I would suspect that the suit will come back to Earth on the very next re-supply mission to be examined.

I'm not sure they will return the suit, it's a bulky item and space on board a Dragon spacecraft (the only supply ship that actually returns cargo to the Earth) is at a premium. However a repair kit was sent up on the most recently launched Progress vehicle (see HERE).

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Critical Situation

Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy were hard at work outside the International Space Station (ISS) for the second time, when water started to leak into Luca Parmitano’s space suit helmet, immediately resulting in the duo heading back to the Quest Airlock to terminate the EVA. Luca and Chris explain the events that happened during EVA # 23.

Credit: ESA

Source: ESA - Space in Videos

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Wow. And it's not like you can take the helmet off, either.

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Hope he did not aspirate any liquid leading to further medical issues. How quickly can a medevac occur now that the shuttle is defunct. Seems we have put astronauts at a much greater risk given the more limited transport.

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Seems we have put astronauts at a much greater risk given the more limited transport.

Nonsense.

The shuttle was never permanently attached to the ISS and so could not be used as an emergency escape vehicle except for the few days each year it was actually docked. During those periods (with the exception of it's final mission) it carried a full crew and so would not have had the room to return the 6 crew of the ISS as well as it's own seven crew members. As a quick response launch vehicle the shuttle was, quite frankly, useless, it took weeks to prepare a vehicle for a launch, far too long to use it for an emergency medvac.

It was far more likely that the shuttle crews would have to use the station to save their lives than the other way around, which is why only one non-station mission was sanctioned after the Columbia accident of 2003 (the STS-125 mission of 2009 and the 4th and final Hubble service mission).

The Soyuz has always been the life-boat vehicle. There are always one or two attached (depending on whether there is a 3 or 6 man crew aboard the station). In an emergency the crews can evacuate at very short notice.

The astronauts are as safe as they always were (possibly safer if you consider the recent safety record of the shuttle vs the Soyuz).

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
typos

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Scary..

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