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ambelamba

Are highly educated people blinded?

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I've been thinking. People are obviously the creatures of their environments, including education.

For the last few months I've been thinking about my past life choices. Yeah, I know it's very useless. But I recently realized that choosing the right field of study can change the life completely. Art is not quite an ideal major for a good career in So Cal because of the fierce competitions and dire needs of networking. But I have to live with the fact that I made a very bad life choice that steered my life in the wrong way.

I wonder what would have happened if I chose a completely different major at a completely different school, such as neuroscience in UCLA. I have a feeling that it would have changed my life in a very different way. Even choosing a easier major like psychology could have made a massively different life path.

It doesn't really apply for all immigrants but to some immigrants, military is the most viable career choice. I have had some good English skill than other Korean immigrants and I had some good physical condition. And I was good at taking orders, being from a very militaristic society. If I chose the right major and waited until I got my citizenship, I wonder what would have happened.

I am sorry for all the rambling but this life choice could have give me a very different perspective in life and spirituality. It's very difficult to remain religious or believe in supernatural if you happen to study neuroscience and be really good at your study. And those who get commissioned as Neurologist officers often get involved in some projects that really make you rethink of your perspective in humanity. I know that some of those guys who study brains end up having some really pessimistic view on people and their spirituality.

But some other people will definitely believe that those eggheads are blinded by their dogma. I bet many of UM members have a very negative opinion on mechanistic worldview, which I find really make sense and help me remain sane.

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I know people who are very specialized in fields tend to over estimate their competency in other fields, even in ones entirely unrelated to their specialty.

On the flipside, I've noticed that people have less knowledge tend to greatly over estimate their understanding of a subject (a problem I frequently run into myself)

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Are highly educated people blinded?

depends how hard you poke them in the eye

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It's very difficult to remain religious or believe in supernatural if you happen to study neuroscience and be really good at your study.

I don't see this as being necessarily true. There is no overlap between science and belief in divinity, and the supernatural - by it's very definition - lies outside the remit of scientific inquiry.

I would agree that there is a clash between science and specifics of some religious beliefs (such as YEC), and science is useful to determine if something observed truly was 'supernatural', because if a reasonable mundane (scientific) explanation can be found then what was observed should not be considered 'supernatural'.

I suspect there is a general antipathy (of varying degrees) towards science from many who believe in the supernatural simply because science might disprove their own personal experience of being of the supernatural. But this is an ego-issue, not a problem with any clash/crossover between science and the supernatural/paranormal.

That science may be able to disprove many personal experiences of being of the supernatural does not indicate that something supernatural may not exist - it simply means people are biased by their own beliefs and/or desires.

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I think it depends on where you are in your spiritual journey. I know some very well-educated people who believe wholeheartedly in the supernatural. I know some not-so-well educated people who scoff at the very idea.

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I don't think it really has much anything to do with a supposed "spiritual journey" really. People of all levels of education have their beliefs that they usually carry with them from the time they were kids.

Education or the lack thereof is not a valid indicator of what they believe or were told to believe.

There are lots of people who are generous, caring and kind to others whilst not harboring any beliefs in a realm outside of observation so

I would agree that there is a clash between science and specifics of some religious beliefs (such as YEC), and science is useful to determine if something observed truly was 'supernatural', because if a reasonable mundane (scientific) explanation can be found then what was observed should not be considered 'supernatural'.

I suspect there is a general antipathy (of varying degrees) towards science from many who believe in the supernatural simply because science might disprove their own personal experience of being of the supernatural. But this is an ego-issue, not a problem with any clash/crossover between science and the supernatural/paranormal.

That science may be able to disprove many personal experiences of being of the supernatural does not indicate that something supernatural may not exist - it simply means people are biased by their own beliefs and/or desires.

Don't forget that it is easier to use the "supernatural" excuse and believe it because it feels nicer and doesn't require any research. It's like saying it was "magic".

Science, as you indicated, requires study and observation and often dispels long held beliefs and myths.

Lots of myths feel good to think about and many like to think it is true but liking an idea doesn't make it true.

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I know people who are very specialized in fields tend to over estimate their competency in other fields, even in ones entirely unrelated to their specialty.

On the flipside, I've noticed that people have less knowledge tend to greatly over estimate their understanding of a subject (a problem I frequently run into myself)

The educated also often over estimate others.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning–Kruger_effect

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Dont look at other people succes ? Try harder create your own ? Only If vincent van gogh would still be alive ! Poor guy would never know his painting are worth alot now !

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I've been thinking. People are obviously the creatures of their environments, including education.

For the last few months I've been thinking about my past life choices. Yeah, I know it's very useless. But I recently realized that choosing the right field of study can change the life completely. Art is not quite an ideal major for a good career in So Cal because of the fierce competitions and dire needs of networking. But I have to live with the fact that I made a very bad life choice that steered my life in the wrong way.

I wonder what would have happened if I chose a completely different major at a completely different school, such as neuroscience in UCLA. I have a feeling that it would have changed my life in a very different way. Even choosing a easier major like psychology could have made a massively different life path.

It doesn't really apply for all immigrants but to some immigrants, military is the most viable career choice. I have had some good English skill than other Korean immigrants and I had some good physical condition. And I was good at taking orders, being from a very militaristic society. If I chose the right major and waited until I got my citizenship, I wonder what would have happened.

I am sorry for all the rambling but this life choice could have give me a very different perspective in life and spirituality. It's very difficult to remain religious or believe in supernatural if you happen to study neuroscience and be really good at your study. And those who get commissioned as Neurologist officers often get involved in some projects that really make you rethink of your perspective in humanity. I know that some of those guys who study brains end up having some really pessimistic view on people and their spirituality.

But some other people will definitely believe that those eggheads are blinded by their dogma. I bet many of UM members have a very negative opinion on mechanistic worldview, which I find really make sense and help me remain sane.

Did you choose a Fine Arts degree? I have a client who is completing his Masters in Fine Arts and already has many job paths to choose from. We are in Southern California too.

I think that if Art is your passion, there will be something for you. It sounds as if you are not sure what you want? I would say be clear on what you want and pursue that, find a way to stand out in the competition. Just an/my opinion based off one post so do not put much into this.Good luck!

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Did you choose a Fine Arts degree? I have a client who is completing his Masters in Fine Arts and already has many job paths to choose from. We are in Southern California too.

I think that if Art is your passion, there will be something for you. It sounds as if you are not sure what you want? I would say be clear on what you want and pursue that, find a way to stand out in the competition. Just an/my opinion based off one post so do not put much into this.Good luck!

No. I chose illustration. At a state university. You will find some real obstacle if you learn to draw and paint at a state university.

And my specialty is figure drawing and fast sketching. Unfortunately most employers look for people who can use colors. I am not that good at painting. That's why I've been trying to get into storyboarding.

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Other than completing high school and a semester of community college, I don't have much formal education.

My education, mostly, has been through books. Although they don't operate as a fully functioning classroom, books are a good source to self-educate, which, in my personal opinion, is not necessarily a bad thing as you're broadening your horizons on numerous different topics. Of course, you'll never be an expert by reading books; unless you read a lot of books - because formal training in a classroom setting is an entirely different situation..

Education can definitely make others feel superior to others, I've noticed.

My cousin, who has a doctorate in psychology, tends to think she's smarter then me.. We've gotten in a few debates and I did nothing but refute her answers in a calculating manner, running circles around her - showing that yes, you can be smart and excel in one field, like psychology, but that doesn't mean you're the smartest person ever if you attempt to dissect a person's mind over the simplest of matters. Subsequently, my cousin doesn't speak to me anymore because she thinks my political views are "disgusting and intolerant" - when ironically she's the one who stooped so low to call them that, and then sever all contact with me despite the fact that I was nothing but open-minded in our discussions.

I digress, my point is that education does not always equal overall intelligence.

Education, of course, can be used to help you grow as a person and help to stimulate the growth of your beliefs.

I suppose it's exactly what you do with that education that determines how it affects your life and beliefs.

Edited by Hatake Kakashi

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Have a friend who is a carpenter doing some work in my house. I don't think he has beyond an 8th grade education. I think he is one of the smartest men I know. I couldn't do what he is doing. I know I would have it all messed up. That is why hired him to do the work. He has a lot of street smarts and common sense. He really knows his trade. He also knows the Bible better than most people I know. I have learned a lot from him. Just helping and watching him work is an education. I think education is good, but you have to know how to think to use it. My friend knows how to think.

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Other than completing high school and a semester of community college, I don't have much formal education.

My education, mostly, has been through books. Although they don't operate as a fully functioning classroom, books are a good source to self-educate, which, in my personal opinion, is not necessarily a bad thing as you're broadening your horizons on numerous different topics. Of course, you'll never be an expert by reading books; unless you read a lot of books - because formal training in a classroom setting is an entirely different situation..

Education can definitely make others feel superior to others, I've noticed.

My cousin, who has a doctorate in psychology, tends to think she's smarter then me.. We've gotten in a few debates and I did nothing but refute her answers in a calculating manner, running circles around her - showing that yes, you can be smart and excel in one field, like psychology, but that doesn't mean you're the smartest person ever if you attempt to dissect a person's mind over the simplest of matters. Subsequently, my cousin doesn't speak to me anymore because she thinks my political views are "disgusting and intolerant" - when ironically she's the one who stooped so low to call them that, and then sever all contact with me despite the fact that I was nothing but open-minded in our discussions.

I digress, my point is that education does not always equal overall intelligence.

Education, of course, can be used to help you grow as a person and help to stimulate the growth of your beliefs.

I suppose it's exactly what you do with that education that determines how it affects your life and beliefs.

There is some truth to this, you can provide a formal environment (school/college)to draw /nurture the intelligence that is already there. But in and of itself education isn't going to make a person a genius unless there are other things there in the first place. One will come away with the best they can be where they are at if they apply the effort too. I work with kids all the time the spark is there or it isn't and when it is you see it,it is not something the system puts there, it nurtures /cultivates existing intelligence.

Edited by Sherapy

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