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Mr.United_Nations

Could werewolves be an extinct Cave Lion?

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Do you think the werewolf was a name for an extinct Cave Lion or large wolf that sparked of the legend? Cave Lions were pretty big and very strong than today's lions. Do you think it was possible a small number survived after the ice age?

I think it would tick all the boxes it was only 12,500 years ago when they last lived.

CaveLionSize.jpg

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No, because I believe the "cave lion" did not turn back into a man when the full moon went for the day, it stayed a cave lion, hence not werewolf, but cave lion.

The first documented werewolf attack was in Germany in 1591. Dogs were sent upon a 'wolf' that turned out to be a man named Peter Stubbe. He was tortured until he confessed to the murder of sixteen people. He even confessed to murdering his own son in his thirst for human flesh and was put to death.

Most legends have had some basis in fact, and the legend of the werewolf is no exception. However the werewolf of popular fantasy/horror novels and films is an imaginary beast, based on extravagant interpretations of past superstitions.

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No, because I believe the "cave lion" did not turn back into a man when the full moon went for the day, it stayed a cave lion, hence not werewolf, but cave lion.

The first documented werewolf attack was in Germany in 1591. Dogs were sent upon a 'wolf' that turned out to be a man named Peter Stubbe. He was tortured until he confessed to the murder of sixteen people. He even confessed to murdering his own son in his thirst for human flesh and was put to death.

Most legends have had some basis in fact, and the legend of the werewolf is no exception. However the werewolf of popular fantasy/horror novels and films is an imaginary beast, based on extravagant interpretations of past superstitions.

I know alll that but the actual idea from the original animal

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I know alll that but the actual idea from the original animal

No. It was a cave lion end off and a very nice one too poor beast. :-*

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Do you think the werewolf was a name for an extinct Cave Lion or large wolf that sparked of the legend? Cave Lions were pretty big and very strong than today's lions. Do you think it was possible a small number survived after the ice age?

It's a nice idea that cryptids and monsters of legend are 'relic memories' from humanity's prehistory, but the reality is (imo) that most of them are fairly modern - within the last few hundred years - while a few go back in legend for a couple of millenia.

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It's also important to keep in mind that wolf predation - especially in Europe - was a HUGE deal. It was something that everyone who lived in the rural areas feared and lived with on a daily basis. So it only makes sense that it would find its way into the folklore of the time.

Edited by Rafterman
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I don't buy into that cave lion theory. IMO the werewolves were created as a way of explanation for the rampant wolf attacks in Europe a long time ago. And besides, it's nice to inject a bit of fantasy into a dreary life.

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Richard it's a good idea but centuries ago continental Europe had a big wolf population and I believe the legend came from actual wolves, not cave lions.

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Do you think the werewolf was a name for an extinct Cave Lion or large wolf that sparked of the legend?

I also think the werewolf legend was sparked by fear of regular wolves. Humans have thousands of years of being attacked by wolves in Europe and Asia as precedent for hating them. Humans hunted and exterminated wolves because they feared them.

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Nope

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I do believe that up till the time of the Romans (not sure about after) there were still native lions in European South East, in the Balkans/Greece/Turkey.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_lions_in_Europe

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I do believe that up till the time of the Romans (not sure about after) there were still native lions in European South East, in the Balkans/Greece/Turkey.

http://en.wikipedia....lions_in_Europe

Yeah. And even after they went extinct, I really doubt that anyone would have mistaken a lion for a wolf. Lions were basically everywhere, from art to heraldry and never left popular knowledge.

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I understand but what about an extinct wolf? I don't buy the large wolf population, its like saying you dont see giant rats eating people.

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I understand but what about an extinct wolf? I don't buy the large wolf population, its like saying you dont see giant rats eating people.

Not really... There was a large wolf species that's extinct (dire wolves), but it only lived in the Americas. Werewolves most likely don't have any real-world counterparts, instead they emerged from old shamanistic traditions of creatures that exist on the boundary between humans and animals.

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