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Still Waters

Could the mythical blue tiger actually exist?

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One of the world's most famous cryptids is the so-called blue tiger, first sighted in China a century ago. Cryptozoologists have even worked how such a creature might come to be.

The blue tiger, or maltese tiger, came to international attention in 1910, when a missionary in the Fujian province of China noticed what he thought was a man in a blue suit. It turned out to be a tiger with a smoky blue coat striped with black.

http://io9.com/could...xist-1331164937

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We used to have a family of 'blue' semi-feral cats on the farm a few years ago. Brilliant 'ratters'!

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It be wonderful if they really do exist.

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Mythical? they do actually exist, close to extinction apparently

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltese_tiger

"In support of the blue tiger theory, Maltese-colored cats certainly do exist. The most common are a domestic cat breed, the Russian Blue, and a variety of the British Shorthair, the British Blue, but blue bobcats and lynxes have also been recorded, and there are genetic mutations and combinations that result in bluish hue, or at least in the impression of a blue-gray animal. Shuker suggested that blue tigers possessed two different pairs of recessive alleles – the non-agouti (s/s), and the dilute (d/d)[4] which combine to produce a solid blue-gray colour as found in domestic cats such as the British Blue and Russian Blue, but would not produce the striped blue tigers reported."

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Most famous? This is the first time I've heard of this creature in 8 years of prowling these forums. That ain't very famous, IMHO.

Could they be real? Sure. The article postulates a possible way it could happen. Though apparently the best recorded sightings by Westerners (Who apparently are all Western Science cares about) was in the 1920s. So this particular genetic expression may be gone for good by now.

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In rabbits, blue is a dilute of black which if it worked the same way in cats, the stripes would be blue, not the base coat of the tiger. Could there have been a blue tiger somewhere in the past? It is really hard to say, most of the tigers known to exist have coats that run from white to red with various shades of tan and orange in-between. I am not saying that an orange tiger could not throw a blue tiger, but if it did, it would most likely be due to a mutation in the coat color rather than a true gene. This is just my opinion based on years of breeding rabbits and I fully admit that I could be wrong

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In rabbits, blue is a dilute of black which if it worked the same way in cats, the stripes would be blue, not the base coat of the tiger. Could there have been a blue tiger somewhere in the past? It is really hard to say, most of the tigers known to exist have coats that run from white to red with various shades of tan and orange in-between. I am not saying that an orange tiger could not throw a blue tiger, but if it did, it would most likely be due to a mutation in the coat color rather than a true gene. This is just my opinion based on years of breeding rabbits and I fully admit that I could be wrong

So does that mean a regular tiger is black with orange stripes?

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Posted (edited)

I'm no feline geneticist, but I met a blue housecat once (I have forgotten his breed). The cat's name was "Monk." Another person on another UM thread said, recently, that tigers and housecats share a lot of DNA. Ipso facto, a blue tiger wouldn't be out of the realm of possibility. Maybe they're celibate? No wonder there are so few. . .

Edited by szentgyorgy

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