Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
TruthSeeker_

Linux on a computer?

25 posts in this topic

Hi,

Is there any Paranormal nerdy with Linux on their computers? :P

I am considering installing it and get rid of Windows and all these viruses while supporting an open source OS.

If so, I could use your insights and I want to know what distributions do you prefer!

Thank you.

Edited by Taridb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

To deal with your viruses, Malwarebytes and Combofix should do the trick. Run Combofix first.

I have Ubuntu installed on a Virtual Machine on my PC. I find that one great and for starters to Linux probably the best to go with.

I also have a Raspberry Pi with Raspbian installed. A Linux/Debian based distribution for the Pi.

Just a note: It helps I you've been using any unix based systems before as use of the terminal and it's commands is a necessity.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Suse, mostly because it is maintained by Novel and that means the least network problems if you have several OS on it (mine has Linux,Unix and Windows machines). Mostly the installation is automatic nowadays, meaning you don't need to go through 100 pages of manual to do it and the desktops are very similar to Apple and Windows making them easy to use. But I guess that applies to all Linux distribution nowadays.

I try to not use virtual machines but dedicated computers with the appropriate OS, unless we are talking real exotics like Q-DOS or similar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been playing with linux for near 15 years. The refinements of the last decade are impressive. I try to fiddle around with a minimum of three versions at any given time, but I tend to return to Kubuntu more often than not, in fact I've been pretty steady with it since around 2006. Lately, Ubuntu (Kubuntu) has brought out the LTS versions, I use 12.04.3 currently. To differentiate, Ubuntu uses a different desktop than Kubuntu, otherwise they are internally the same. I happen to like the KDE desktop, which as improved tremendously in the last decade.

Ubuntu uses the Unity desktop, Kubuntu uses KDE. One caveat to what I say is that I have NOT spent a ton of time with Gnome/Unity, much more time with KDE. You makes your choice and takes your chances, so it's said. As I keep playing with Unity, I might well grow to like it. I do find some things a bit better with Unity, but for the most part, I still prefer KDE. Other desktops are available, so you definitely have options.

I prefer the overall stability of a true multitasking system built around Unix concepts over something like windows, besides the fact that I have some difficulty with paying two or three hundred bucks to some outfit that holds everything so close to the chest, so to speak. While I worked in electronics (ret.) I did programming in windows and came to dislike the structure way too much to continue that line of work. Since a substantial amount of my professional work was using OS9 (a multitasking OS built on Unix concepts, a subset set up for control systems), I do prefer that abilities of linux over windows. Personal preference only.

Under Kubuntu I use Virtualbox as a virtual machine base, which allows me use of windows if I want. Takes a bit of learning, but it's worth it if you just need windows to do a few things. Certain of my software requires windows, so that's what I use. Other programs require me to boot into windows, so I use it on occasion for that stuff. Overall, although some freeware is a bit buggy, I find I can do much more with linux than I can with windows, and don't need all the security junk as with windows. So keep in mind that you can run windows (or any other OS) in a virtual machine, which removes your windows from your computer, effectively, and won't allow any of the worms etc you have to worry about if you run windows directly. But... It's necessary to explore this a bit to determine what you can and can't do from a virtual machine.

So, I tend to keep returning to Kubuntu, but currently I have Ubuntu, Kubuntu (two each, 1204 and 1304) and openSUSE on here, with Windows XP (soon to be 7). Most windows stuff I do under Virtualbox, as stated, but a couple things I need to boot windows.

Almost anything you need to do you can find under linux, usually free under the GNU license. Keep in mind there is a learning curve, so some things you do you will need to learn the terminal/command line stuff, but there is a lot of help out there for that sort of thing.

Hope this helps.

Edited by RabidCat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Thank you all for your comments, that's very helpful.

RabidCad I didn't not fully understand your message, I am a newby on this but that's interesting stuffs.

I wasn't able to clean up my computer with malwerebytes and Combofix, my computer was badly infected and was booting by itself.

I succesfully installed Linux Fedora 19 and ditched Windows 8 and so far it's seems to work well though all is new and strange to me. Geez Windows 8 is 100$+ more and I couldn't afford a fresh installation.

Been a Windows user all my life make it awkward to navigate through Linux but it's worth it.

I am suprised though that few people in the public use Linux. People are saying wow what is that I don't know about it! Is it Mac? no? What is it then?

Of course it's not all easy, you have to search long and hard sometimes to know what to do but I am able to do the things I usually do with my computer.

Linux rocks but it still seems to remain an ''alternative'' for many and is always overshadowed by Windows and Mac.

Edited by Taridb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You didn't have your cd key for windows 8 lying around? You shouldnt need to buy a new OS for that.

Glad you're enjoying it. It might be a little slow at first. But after a while you'll get used to everything like every OS. I myself have been recently learning how to navigate through OSX Mountain Lion.

Learning how to use Lonux can help you down the track if you ever start managing servers due to the similar interfaces and methods you'd be using to install, configure and maintain them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"People are saying wow what is that I don't know about it! Is it Mac? no? What is it then?"

Well, actually the Mac OS changed to FreeBSD, a Unix flavour, several years ago. And yes, you can get Linux for Apple computers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I currently use Ubuntu, and I find that it generally performs much better than Windows ever did. It seems to handle file transfers much more quickly.

I wish it were a little less broken feeling, though. Right now it seems that half the machine doesn't quite work out how it's supposed to. I mean, I'm sure with time it will become a very solid system, but right now it isn't quite there. The future looks bright, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Orcseeker When I purchased my computer Windows 8 was aldready installed on it and I didn't get any CD or product key for further installations. My girlfriend used my computer to dowload various things and she wasn't careful enough, it infected badly. A fresh installation of some kind was needed and Linux came to my help.

Anyway.. I am quite happy to have made the change to Linux, if it took that to realize there is other great options out there then it's more positive than negative.

Fedora 19 runs smoothly with my 4GB RAM machine and I can do the things I want without much difficulty, that was my main concern: usability. Though I still need to figure some things out. I guess it would be the same if I had switched to Apple, which I am not familliar with. I plan to install Fedora on my girlfriend 1GB RAM 60 gig hardrive computer to replace old XP and give it some life in the same time. :)

I guess what stop people to make the move is change. People are used to Windows and won't make the jump to Linux and learn how to use a terminal and things like that.

Edited by Taridb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Orcseeker When I purchased my computer Windows 8 was aldready installed on it and I didn't get any CD or product key for further installations. My girlfriend used my computer to dowload various things and she wasn't careful enough, it infected badly. A fresh installation of some kind was needed and Linux came to my help.

Anyway.. I am quite happy to have made the change to Linux, if it took that to realize there is other great options out there then it's more positive than negative.

Fedora 19 runs smoothly with my 4GB RAM machine and I can do the things I want without much difficulty, that was my main concern: usability. Though I still need to figure some things out. I guess it would be the same if I had switched to Apple, which I am not familliar with. I plan to install Fedora on my girlfriend 1GB RAM 60 gig hardrive computer to replace old XP and give it some life in the same time. :)

I guess what stop people to make the move is change. People are used to Windows and won't make the jump to Linux and learn how to use a terminal and things like that.

You could contact your computers manufacturer or call Microsoft. Just to get your cd key back for the software you paid for.

I've use all types of operating systems. Mac has a terminal based on UNIX as mac is also based off unix.

Learning something different is tricky, but I'm the case of these current operating systems. Very much worthwhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I routinely reload windows 7 every few months. Junk just seems to sneak onto it and I don't do anything like run executables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your comments, that's very helpful.

RabidCad I didn't not fully understand your message, I am a newby on this but that's interesting stuffs.

I wasn't able to clean up my computer with malwerebytes and Combofix, my computer was badly infected and was booting by itself.

I succesfully installed Linux Fedora 19 and ditched Windows 8 and so far it's seems to work well though all is new and strange to me. Geez Windows 8 is 100$+ more and I couldn't afford a fresh installation.

Been a Windows user all my life make it awkward to navigate through Linux but it's worth it.

I am suprised though that few people in the public use Linux. People are saying wow what is that I don't know about it! Is it Mac? no? What is it then?

Of course it's not all easy, you have to search long and hard sometimes to know what to do but I am able to do the things I usually do with my computer.

Linux rocks but it still seems to remain an ''alternative'' for many and is always overshadowed by Windows and Mac.

What part(s) didn't you fully understand?

You've used Windows, obviously, so you know pretty much how that mess sort of works. As to Linux, you know, or should know, that there are different desktops you can use, such as KDE (my personal favorite), Gnome, or a half dozen others that offer different modes of operation. All are interface to the Linux kernel. I happen to prefer KDE (Kubuntu) simply because it's similar to windows (not 8) in the interface. If you prefer the windows 8 type, probably the Ubuntu version of linux since windows 8 stole a lot of stuff from the Unity desktop. Currently, I have Kubuntu 1204, Kubuntu 1304 and Ubuntu Unity on this computer, with windows 7 awaiting installation. Once that is done, assuming I am patient enough to slog through the windows junk, all I need to do is choose which system I want to boot when I turn on. Remember, now, that while in electronics, I was forced to use windows most of the time, save when I was working on systems that used OS9.

Linux is very secure, and with the hardware firewall I have in the router, I've never had to deal with junk other than the standard cookies. Linux will not (generally speaking) allow any program to be installed without admin permission (and you are admin), so it's your choice. Most freeware is well checked for bots and that sort of crud.

If you do prefer to use windows, you can run windows (or any other OS) through a virtual machine. Essentially, what happens is this: you run linux as normal, but install a virtual shell in linux, such as Virtualbox (free). In VB, you install windows or whatever, and set it up however you want as far as memory, disk space and so on. Usually, VB will have a downloadable set of interface files for the OS to make things run smoother. Now, you fire up VB and start windows, or whatever. You now can internet, or do pretty much whatever windows will do, such as install other programs that run under windows only. Using a dedicated folder, you can transfer files from this windows (a virtual windows) to linux and back. What this does is offer a layer of removal from the web, such that if your virtual windows does catch cold, it is very difficult for a hacker to destroy your base system, since linux won't let that happen.

In other words, you simply don't worry about using windows on the web any more, once you've set up and use a virtual machine. Also, keep in mind that using linux, windows will not use nearly as much disk space, memory, and so on, since linux has a much better file system. With all my OSs on hard drives (2Tb, one dedicated to windows if i need a hard windows, and one dedicated to all the linux versions), I still have so much space I can't possibly fill these drives.

On my versions of linux, there is little I need to be concerned about as far as filetypes and so forth. I can open and manipulate just about any type of file. In fact, wifey consistently sends me stuff to decode (her laptop is windows) that she can't open or do anything with; so I modify the filetype and send it back so she can deal with it.

Many of the freebie programs are superb, besides being cheap. Such stuff as the Gimp are so close to Photoshop it amazes me that more people don't use it. Further, I can download (actually have downloaded) schematic/pcb programs that are nearly as good as the commercial stuff, so I don't need to spend a couple thousand bucks to design something. All sorts of cross assemblers, compilers and so forth are around, along with a ton of games, teaching tools, stuff for kids, biology, engineering of all disciplines and all that.

I just don't quite know what's not to like about linux, at least the ones I use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I reckon, after reading that last post, I left out some pretty important items. Best way to do this is to give an example of the way I've been working through linux for quite a while.

So, I boot into Kubuntu with the intention of doing some sound lab work, besides my other normal junk, such as emails and news and suchlike. In order to save some time, I move my sound files, whether they're MP3, wave or whatever to a transfer folder that windows accesses. In my current config, I have WinXP installed in Virtualbox, and my sound lab (DiamondCut 8) installed in XP. Now I start XP (which boots probably 10x faster in a virtual machine) and start DC8, load up some tunes for modification, and set that thing to do a normalize. While that's running, I switch desktops (click a button or turn the wheel) and start up Firefox or Chromium (the linux version of Chrome, without tracking) and do my email stuff. During that time I usually turn on a load graph to see what's happening elsewhere in the 'puter. Usually it's easy to tell from the load what is finished and what's not (I run an 8 core AMD, and each core is graphed for usage). Mostly, the sound stuff will be done by the time I get on the net, or shortly thereafter, so I can switch desktops and start other things in windows, such as declicking and so forth. Switching back to the Fox, I can read the news while the other things are working, switching desktops when something needs more work to do. Note here that you can have as many desktops or windows open as you wish; Linux will not get confused as windows sometimes does. Also, remember that you have a swap space where memory gets stored if need be, although I've never seen the swap use more than a couple megabytes (I run 16 Mb ram).

So, you can have pretty much as many windows open as you wish, plus you can have multiple desktops open, each with its own set of windows and programs running. Linux is a true multitasker/multiuser machine, whereas Windows starts sweating with more than three or four windows open, and you can forget multiple desktops. With a little luck and a lot of fooling around, you can use virtual machines in windows, but personally I just don't trust it enough to waste my semi-valuable time on it. Much rather use linux.

With the load showing (this is part of KDE) you can tell pretty much exactly what's happening in your machine. For instance, if you're downloading something and have the load showing, you know just about exactly how fast your download is running, how fast the connected server is running, and how loaded your own machine is, all nicely graphed in function. In short form, once you get to know linux, you will know everything you want to about what's going on where, most likely more than you care about. Want to know what's up in your machine? There's an infocenter (in KDE) that will tell you everything you don't really want to know about what's there, hardware, software and interface.

I also play games now and then, but, unfortunately, linux is quick enough that the other tasks don't give me much time for that.

When you deal with multitasking/multiuser systems, it's a whole different world. When windows does this stuff, it gobbles up memory as if there's no limit, it loads more than a single iteration of given drivers, and so on. Scrap ideas about multithreading and so forth, and follow the software. When windows loads stuff, it loads separate programs to do its things, even though those may be multiple iterations. Take a print set, for instance. If you are in windows, and you have four programs and set each program to print something, each program will load its own print drivers etc. IF the thing is capable and IF you've done it right, those four separate programs will use gobs of memory and load separate programs/drivers to do the print jobs. On linux, being patterned after Unix, if you do the same thing, only one set of printer drivers will be loaded, since each of the four programs will use the same driver. Linux will load the printer driver and open queus for other programs to use, and once the first is finished the same drivers will switch to the second queu and operate that, and so on till it's all done.

What all this means is that linux is far more memory/disk space efficient than windows. Further, if you should take a shine to it, you can get all the source code (very expensive for windows) free and learn it and write your own code.

Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such stuff as the Gimp are so close to Photoshop it amazes me that more people don't use it.

I've used GIMP for years on Windows and Linux, but Photoshop is the far superior.

Also, when comparing my GIMP experience across platforms, the Linux version seems to be fairly broken. A number of tools don't operate properly, and I often have to trick the program into performing certain actions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used GIMP for years on Windows and Linux, but Photoshop is the far superior.

Also, when comparing my GIMP experience across platforms, the Linux version seems to be fairly broken. A number of tools don't operate properly, and I often have to trick the program into performing certain actions.

Can you elucidate, Nathan? I'd like to know what doesn't work right (so maybe I won't use it, or why it might work for me). Always I'm curious about these things.

I've used the Gimp for years also, both on windows and linux. For what I do, which admittedly isn't as intense as what many do, Gimp works as well as Photoshop. The caveat here is that mostly I work with old photos I've scanned and wish to keep.

I would like to know what I should avoid in Gimp. I'd appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you elucidate, Nathan? I'd like to know what doesn't work right (so maybe I won't use it, or why it might work for me). Always I'm curious about these things.

I've used the Gimp for years also, both on windows and linux. For what I do, which admittedly isn't as intense as what many do, Gimp works as well as Photoshop. The caveat here is that mostly I work with old photos I've scanned and wish to keep.

I would like to know what I should avoid in Gimp. I'd appreciate it.

Me too, 'cause a few years ago I dumped PS for the gimp (both under Linux, Unix and Windows) because of its trans-OS capabilities as well as my commercial graphic design prog, my Office suite and my commercial DTP. Must have missed something along the way...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I installed Win 7 on two 'puters here last week, including this one. I simply cannot see why anyone would use that thing unless required to do so. So, I'll continue to use Kubuntu for just about everything, and I'll live dvd on one of the windows 'puters to transfer files the lady of the house needs there.

Otherwise, the only use for Windows on this computer is my sound lab, which I can use in virtual windows, and my vinyl conversion system, and perhaps I'll get one of those silly cassette converters sometime for the hundreds of tapes I have.

Now I'll quit this, before I offend all the windows fanatics out there, if I haven't already. Sorry, I think.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I installed Win 7 on two 'puters here last week, including this one. I simply cannot see why anyone would use that thing unless required to do so. So, I'll continue to use Kubuntu for just about everything, and I'll live dvd on one of the windows 'puters to transfer files the lady of the house needs there.

Otherwise, the only use for Windows on this computer is my sound lab, which I can use in virtual windows, and my vinyl conversion system, and perhaps I'll get one of those silly cassette converters sometime for the hundreds of tapes I have.

Now I'll quit this, before I offend all the windows fanatics out there, if I haven't already. Sorry, I think.

Don't be, the truth is the truth. And if there would be as much commercial support for Linux as there is for Windows nobody would touch Windows with a ten foot pole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I use GIMP pretty extensively for covers and other editing purposes when I reprint comics, and I also use it for spriting as a hobbyist. Most of the drag and alignment tools don't seem to work properly. The centering tool has never worked in the Linux version (though it used to work quite well when I had Windows), and the drag tool is extremely picky about what it will and will not move and to where. The writing tool, which works most of the time, will sometimes decide it doesn't like my text placement and launch the entire box off the canvas, which is a pain.

I mean, it's workable. It just isn't as refined as it is on other OS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I use GIMP pretty extensively for covers and other editing purposes when I reprint comics, and I also use it for spriting as a hobbyist. Most of the drag and alignment tools don't seem to work properly. The centering tool has never worked in the Linux version (though it used to work quite well when I had Windows), and the drag tool is extremely picky about what it will and will not move and to where. The writing tool, which works most of the time, will sometimes decide it doesn't like my text placement and launch the entire box off the canvas, which is a pain.

I mean, it's workable. It just isn't as refined as it is on other OS.

I have no real problems using Suse and the Gnome desktop, don't know how well it works under other configurations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I am tempted to use Linux but I am a bit scared off by all this talk of having to learn some commands or some weird stuff when really I just want to install and go.

I don't understand this "Virtual Machine" thingee and it seems I would be spending more time learning commands (sounds like DOS) than just clicking so I can do what I want.

My next confuzzlement is all the types of Linux OS out there. What one is the best and easiest? What ones let me use my programs I have in Windows? I also have been hearing that Linux isn't always the most secure either but then again what is now days, right?

But it is probably true..I am used to Windows and am apprehensive to having to learn, basically, programming, just to do something simple. I guess I just don't want to become a part-time programmer and coder just to use my computer.

As for GIMP..I had the windows version and while it was ok I really didn't care for it. It was laggy, even its start-up was slow and it just felt...clumsy to me. Kind of unfriendly in a way. Then again I am used to the Photoshop environment so I suppose I am a tad biased.

I guess I'd rather find a computer somewhere that has Linux already on it and try it out my self before I go any farther.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'd rather find a computer somewhere that has Linux already on it and try it out my self before I go any farther.

get yourself an older model (I am talking 1-5 years, not stone age) at a garage sale and put Linux on it to start with. It is quite easy,in most cases you just have to pop a CD into the drive and let it do its work.

If you use Linux from a desktop there is hardly anything you have to learn that you don't know yet, but if you want to you can go to OS command level.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, the loading time is the one thing Linux GIMP has over Windows GIMP. I know the Windows version can take ages to get going, but the Linux version boots up in about ten seconds.

I honestly feel like Linux (at least, Ubuntu) will become more user-friendly and competent as it gains traction. I'm willing to wait it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I am tempted to use Linux but I am a bit scared off by all this talk of having to learn some commands or some weird stuff when really I just want to install and go.

I don't understand this "Virtual Machine" thingee and it seems I would be spending more time learning commands (sounds like DOS) than just clicking so I can do what I want.

My next confuzzlement is all the types of Linux OS out there. What one is the best and easiest? What ones let me use my programs I have in Windows? I also have been hearing that Linux isn't always the most secure either but then again what is now days, right?

But it is probably true..I am used to Windows and am apprehensive to having to learn, basically, programming, just to do something simple. I guess I just don't want to become a part-time programmer and coder just to use my computer.

As for GIMP..I had the windows version and while it was ok I really didn't care for it. It was laggy, even its start-up was slow and it just felt...clumsy to me. Kind of unfriendly in a way. Then again I am used to the Photoshop environment so I suppose I am a tad biased.

I guess I'd rather find a computer somewhere that has Linux already on it and try it out my self before I go any farther.

You just need to know a few bash commands to get started and what you essentially want to do.

Hmm what VM are you using? The one I use is Pracle VirtualBox. It's as simple as pressing start to load your Linux OS within windows.

Ubuntu is typically the easiest. It's the most popular and widespread as a result from all the newcomers. Plus due to this, a lot more people to seek help from or have asked and answered questions you'll need to know.

You will need to use a program called Wine I run windows executables in Linux.

Linux is based on Unix. A very secure OS. It is also typically one of the OSs of choice for servers as a result an is growing year by year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, I do not know much about Ubuntu but many people says that it is as user friendly as windows. Installing it is easier than Windows and you have built-in drivers. The command line is not often required actually, you can install your softwares the same way you do with Windows. You even a have softwares center with all the open source software available for quick download. A free cloud Ubuntu of 5G. All the updates are taken care of in the update manager just like the ''Windows Update''. Anyway, if you want to use the command line to install something, all that you need to know about that command will most of the time be easily found on the Internet.

Though I am relatively new to Linux, the two OS distributions that stood out to me are Fedora and Ubuntu. You don't need to be a geek to use them. They have strong communities and they will help you if you have any trouble. They offer long term support for each version.

As for the security, I have never felt more secure on a computer. You have a built-in firewall and no need of antiviruses. Use firefox, chromium or google chrome and feel safe browsing.

Edited by Taridb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.