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lost bird

Jerusalem

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I don't time now , but some one google it and tell us : one man among famous Greek or Roman historian , philosopher wrote Jerusalem was a holy city of Ethiopians, built by them, the mighty muslim of Ancient days who worship Allah alone with no partner beside Him.

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I don't care what a philosopher says if it contradicts the Bible. The boundaries of the land God gave Adam are the same boundaries all through the Bible known as the land of Canaan and land of Israel. The southern river boundary of Adam's land was Africa/Egypt or the land of Ethiopia, which means that land was already inhabited by the Ethiopians. I see no reason to think the Garden of Eden (Jerusalem) was built by anyone descendants of Adam, the first Jew.

The Canaanites were descendants of Cain and since Cain was forced out of Israel, they have been trying to get back ever since. But Providence keeps running them out.

God bless

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Basing political claims on myths and ancient traditions just is not acceptable. I support the existence of the state of Israel and think the Arabs and others need to clean up their act regarding them, and blame the others for most of the problems there, but Israel has no right to any territory based on myths.

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Basing political claims on myths and ancient traditions just is not acceptable. I support the existence of the state of Israel and think the Arabs and others need to clean up their act regarding them, and blame the others for most of the problems there, but Israel has no right to any territory based on myths.

It's even worse when he can't get the myth right since the Bible places the Garden of Eden in southern Mesopotamia, in particular Sumer, which is nowhere near Jerusalem.

cormac

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It's even worse when he can't get the myth right since the Bible places the Garden of Eden in southern Mesopotamia, in particular Sumer, which is nowhere near Jerusalem.

cormac

The northern boundary of Eden, (Israel), was the rivers of Hiddekel, (Tigris), and Euphrates which flowed toward the east of Assyria. That is just the northern border. There are two other rivers given as the southern and eastern boundary of Eden. Pishon River, (Jordan River), compasseth the whole length of Havilah (Israel). The southern border was the River Gihon, (Nile), which compasseth the land of Ethiopia.

The Garden eastward in Eden was Jerusalem. The Ethiopians were already in the land of Ethiopia with the Nile River as their boundary before Adam, the first Jew, was created. Adam was created and placed in the garden.

In the Bible, the land is never identified as the land of a certain people before that group of people live there. The Ethiopians are probably the actual ones who built the Egyptian Pyramids. When the first force of over flowing floods came in Noah's deludge, that is probably what washed the outer layer of stones off the pyramids, leaving the very top layer in tact on at least one of them. By the times the floods submerged the pyramids the surface water was so high above the pyramids as to leave the rest as we see them today. This is speculation, I admit; but since Time Magazine says they don't actually know who built them or how long they have been there, it is a probability.

The Ethiopians didn't build Jerusalem.

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Posted (edited)

Jerusalem built by Ethiopians!!! That sounds like something akin to a conspiracy theory with an anti-Jewish agenda. Jerusalem was rebuilt by Herod with Jewish money sent on a steady albeit periodic basis from Babylon. It happens that about 95% of the Jews who returned from exile in Babylon were of the lower social class. The rich ones stayed and to compensate for their failure to hear the call to return they took upon themselves to rain the Babylonian mammon on Jerusalem. Herod happened to have been the king at the time and just sucked the cash from the mother's milk.

Edited by Ben Masada

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Basing political claims on myths and ancient traditions just is not acceptable. I support the existence of the state of Israel

Way to have it both ways lol

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The northern boundary of Eden, (Israel), was the rivers of Hiddekel, (Tigris), and Euphrates which flowed toward the east of Assyria. That is just the northern border. There are two other rivers given as the southern and eastern boundary of Eden. Pishon River, (Jordan River), compasseth the whole length of Havilah (Israel). The southern border was the River Gihon, (Nile), which compasseth the land of Ethiopia.

The Garden eastward in Eden was Jerusalem. The Ethiopians were already in the land of Ethiopia with the Nile River as their boundary before Adam, the first Jew, was created. Adam was created and placed in the garden.

In the Bible, the land is never identified as the land of a certain people before that group of people live there. The Ethiopians are probably the actual ones who built the Egyptian Pyramids. When the first force of over flowing floods came in Noah's deludge, that is probably what washed the outer layer of stones off the pyramids, leaving the very top layer in tact on at least one of them. By the times the floods submerged the pyramids the surface water was so high above the pyramids as to leave the rest as we see them today. This is speculation, I admit; but since Time Magazine says they don't actually know who built them or how long they have been there, it is a probability.

The Ethiopians didn't build Jerusalem.

Misrepresenting what the Bible claims doesn't make it true. The Bible says that the four rivers parted on their way out of Eden. The Tigris, the Euphrates, the Karun River (possibly Gihon) and the Wadi al-Batin (possibly Pison) all come together and then empty into the Persian Gulf. The Jordan and Nile Rivers have nothing to do with Eden.

Actually, as described it would have been southern Mesopotamia particularly the area that became Sumer.

A literal reading of the Bible suggests that Adam and Eve were the first humans, therefore no other humans existed before them. You can't have it both ways.

The Egyptians built the Pyramids and there was no Great Flood.

This is the closest to being right you've come so far. Early canaanites built Jerusalem before the Hebrews/Jews are claimed to have taken it over.

cormac

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I don't time now , but some one google it and tell us : one man among famous Greek or Roman historian , philosopher wrote Jerusalem was a holy city of Ethiopians, built by them, the mighty muslim of Ancient days who worship Allah alone with no partner beside Him.

If you are going to post a topic, do your own research. Don't demand that others do it for you!

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Way to have it both ways lol

You obviously haven't heard the phrase "British Mandate of Palestine".

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I don't time now , but some one google it and tell us : one man among famous Greek or Roman historian , philosopher wrote Jerusalem was a holy city of Ethiopians, built by them, the mighty muslim of Ancient days who worship Allah alone with no partner beside Him.

Jerusalem the city has been in existence for around 6,000 years - although the area was settled well before that. The builders of the city were likely the indigenous inhabitants of the area - Canaanites. It is unlikely at that time there was any meaningful contact between this region and (what was known then as) Ethiopia.

Additionally, the date of the city's formation predates that of Islam by over 4,000 years so there is no way possible the city's constructors were of the Muslim faith.

I don't know of any ancient Greek or Roman philosophers who wrote that Ethiopians built Jerusalem, although I do know of the "Ethiopian Jerusalem" - Lalibela. Perhaps what you have heard is someone misconnecting dots and confusing things they have heard?

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Misrepresenting what the Bible claims doesn't make it true. The Bible says that the four rivers parted on their way out of Eden. The Tigris, the Euphrates, the Karun River (possibly Gihon) and the Wadi al-Batin (possibly Pison) all come together and then empty into the Persian Gulf. The Jordan and Nile Rivers have nothing to do with Eden.

Actually, as described it would have been southern Mesopotamia particularly the area that became Sumer.

A literal reading of the Bible suggests that Adam and Eve were the first humans, therefore no other humans existed before them. You can't have it both ways.

The Egyptians built the Pyramids and there was no Great Flood.

This is the closest to being right you've come so far. Early canaanites built Jerusalem before the Hebrews/Jews are claimed to have taken it over.

cormac

Im sure there was a Great Flood. Babylon and there are some iffy tales that come from Egypt both speak of a global flood. Now global as in the whole world I doubt it(but then I dont know so anythings possible), but a man's home is the center of the world for him. Look at the Sahara or the recent island that just popped up. Crazy extreme changes isnt unusual for our planet.

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Flood happen all over the world. Babylon and Egypt are both in flood plains. Rivers=floods. Back before news papers, cars, TV and computers for most people the whole world is about 100 sq miles. When you're sitting round the camp fire telling stories, a local flood becomes a world wide flood. A traveler comes into camp and he tells you his flood story it becomes a world wide flood never mind they happen 2 yrs apart. Kind of like fish, they keep growing long after you caught and ate it.

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Basing political claims on myths and ancient traditions just is not acceptable. I support the existence of the state of Israel and think the Arabs and others need to clean up their act regarding them, and blame the others for most of the problems there, but Israel has no right to any territory based on myths.

Does it mean that in your opinion the Tanach was written out of myths?

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Flood happen all over the world. Babylon and Egypt are both in flood plains. Rivers=floods. Back before news papers, cars, TV and computers for most people the whole world is about 100 sq miles. When you're sitting round the camp fire telling stories, a local flood becomes a world wide flood. A traveler comes into camp and he tells you his flood story it becomes a world wide flood never mind they happen 2 yrs apart. Kind of like fish, they keep growing long after you caught and ate it.

Or that infamous "one that got away", which gets a little bit bigger every time you retell the story.

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If you are going to post a topic, do your own research. Don't demand that others do it for you!

Exactly, JMPD1. If I ever post "String theory proven in my basement, tell Mom I found Atlantis two doors down from the edge of the Bermuda Triangle, please look it up for me," please have me committed.

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Im sure there was a Great Flood. Babylon and there are some iffy tales that come from Egypt both speak of a global flood. Now global as in the whole world I doubt it(but then I dont know so anythings possible), but a man's home is the center of the world for him. Look at the Sahara or the recent island that just popped up. Crazy extreme changes isnt unusual for our planet.

There is only one definition for Global flood and that's literally a flooding of the entire globe. Evidence of which is non-existant. Anything less than "global" is regional at best which is not what the Bible claims.

cormac

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There is only one definition for Global flood and that's literally a flooding of the entire globe. Evidence of which is non-existant. Anything less than "global" is regional at best which is not what the Bible claims.

cormac

1-are you sure that's what the Bible states? The Hebrew word used here in the flood (from memory, "bara", though don't quote me on it) is a term used to describe a patch of land. Out can be used to refer to the whole earth, but it can also refer to only sections of it (for example, when the Israelites were apportioning the Promised Land they were each given "bara" (again, I could be wrong on the exact word) and then told what traditional portions this bara encompassed.

A flooding of the whole bara could be read only in terms of the whole bara known to the author.

2- Even if it did refer to a flooding of the whole literal earth, the text displays markers consistent with Hebrew poetry and story telling techniques. It is therefore necessary to point out that the text does not need to be interpreted directly as a scientific and historical account of the flood, but could result be referred to in terms of the theological discourse between men and God - specifically the decline of humanity without the guiding hand of God. In story-telling terms that makes just as much sense (if not more) than a story just about the survivors of a flood (though there may have been a flood on which the story of Noah is based).

Either way, there is no reason to accept the narrative to mean that there was actually a global flood.

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1-are you sure that's what the Bible states? The Hebrew word used here in the flood (from memory, "bara", though don't quote me on it) is a term used to describe a patch of land. Out can be used to refer to the whole earth, but it can also refer to only sections of it (for example, when the Israelites were apportioning the Promised Land they were each given "bara" (again, I could be wrong on the exact word) and then told what traditional portions this bara encompassed.

A flooding of the whole bara could be read only in terms of the whole bara known to the author.

2- Even if it did refer to a flooding of the whole literal earth, the text displays markers consistent with Hebrew poetry and story telling techniques. It is therefore necessary to point out that the text does not need to be interpreted directly as a scientific and historical account of the flood, but could result be referred to in terms of the theological discourse between men and God - specifically the decline of humanity without the guiding hand of God. In story-telling terms that makes just as much sense (if not more) than a story just about the survivors of a flood (though there may have been a flood on which the story of Noah is based).

Either way, there is no reason to accept the narrative to mean that there was actually a global flood.

Yes I'm sure. But my point is that one can't take the interpretation of a regional flood from something that states it was a global flood. Not that there's any evidence of a global flood or that I believe there was one, there isn't and I don't, but the Bible stands on what it says and not on what one wants to reinterpret it to mean. And actually there is no reason to believe there was any flood in what would have been lower Mesopotamia that affected only the ancestors of the Hebrews, since that is where the Bible places their origin.

cormac

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Either way, there is no reason to accept the narrative to mean that there was actually a global flood.

There most definitely is, unless you wish to reinterpret...

Gen 6:7 "I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them."

...as suggesting all of mankind, all the "beasts and creeping things" and all the "fowls of the air" were to be found only in a small region of the planet at that time.

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There most definitely is, unless you wish to reinterpret...

Gen 6:7 "I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them."

...as suggesting all of mankind, all the "beasts and creeping things" and all the "fowls of the air" were to be found only in a small region of the planet at that time.

I have to wonder if next up will be someone's reinterpretation of the meaning of the word "all".

cormac

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>sigh< Where is Bill Clinton when you need him.........

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From persia to India, from India to west Africa including Arabia and Palestine were the dwelling place of Ancient Ethiopians. But the source of nile river was sacred place of this people. It is the original Jerusalem and Garden Eden where Jehovah god, Adam lived.

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From persia to India, from India to west Africa including Arabia and Palestine were the dwelling place of Ancient Ethiopians. But the source of nile river was sacred place of this people. It is the original Jerusalem and Garden Eden where Jehovah god, Adam lived.

Can you tell me when there was ever a country called Palestine and where it was located?

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Can you tell me when there was ever a country called Palestine and where it was located?

Part of the region has been known as 'Palestine' intermittently since at least Roman times through to post-industrial European (British) occupation. If you doubt this, check out ancient (and not-so-ancient) maps of the region.

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