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Asadora

Deaths due to severe wasp stings raise alarm

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For those that have read my update status recently, know that I have been having a major wasp problem above my second story window. I've already called the council to have someone come out to treat the problem. At the cost of £54. And just when I think I've stopped OCD'ing over the problem... I find and end up reading the following article:

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2013-09/27/content_16997936.htm

Someone...somewhere has quite the sense of humour.

P.S. - And no, I did not go hunting for wasp articles. I was reading another site that -just happened- to have this article linked.

Oi vey.

:blush:

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That's quite a synchronicity, finding the article in the midst of your wasp infestation.

Anyone with sensitivity to insect stings could theoretically go into life-threatening anaphylactic shock when stung. As a teenager I was stung on my thumb (where cuticle meets nail) by a large wasp, and experienced brief shortness of breath and profuse sweating. I should not have been surprised when, years later, I was stung by a box jellyfish (so-called "sea wasp") and did go into anaphylaxis, needing several hours of hospitalization to recover. Apparently I have to be careful around any venomous critters.

A handy, but expensive, tool in this regard in the "epi-pen" (short for epinephrine) which can diminish the reaction to the sting/venom. If one is extremely sensitive to bees, wasps, hornets, etc. it's wise to carry one in purse or glove box, and on one's person if hiking out in the hinterlands.

Good luck with your visitors. May they leave you in peace as they leave.

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That's quite a synchronicity, finding the article in the midst of your wasp infestation.

Anyone with sensitivity to insect stings could theoretically go into life-threatening anaphylactic shock when stung. As a teenager I was stung on my thumb (where cuticle meets nail) by a large wasp, and experienced brief shortness of breath and profuse sweating. I should not have been surprised when, years later, I was stung by a box jellyfish (so-called "sea wasp") and did go into anaphylaxis, needing several hours of hospitalization to recover. Apparently I have to be careful around any venomous critters.

A handy, but expensive, tool in this regard in the "epi-pen" (short for epinephrine) which can diminish the reaction to the sting/venom. If one is extremely sensitive to bees, wasps, hornets, etc. it's wise to carry one in purse or glove box, and on one's person if hiking out in the hinterlands.

Good luck with your visitors. May they leave you in peace as they leave.

I keep an epi-pen also. Bee sting a few years back nearly canceled Christmas permanently on me. :) My nose was 3 inches wide (didn't even think that was possible) and chest hurt, much trouble breathing. In a case like that...epinephrine is our friend :)
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Yes I'm aware of the handiess of the epi-pen for anaphylactic shock. But what I am not too sure about is how one knows they would have anaphylactic shock after being stung? Is it one of them things that one doesn't find out unless one gets stung? I've always wondered this. Not everyone is highly allergic to stings, but my brother is and my mother is and well going by that I can only assume that I would be too.

But it's not me nor my husband I'm most concerned about, it's my Lab, which is why I've been sweeping up dead wasps all day. (The pest man came and sprayed his magic dust this morning. He said give it 48 hours for the treatment to fully take affect - the stuff works very quickly. He also said to be on the alert that the wasps will become highly aggressive before they die off.)

Thank you both for your replies and support:) It's nice to be able to talk about something that others can relate too.

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