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Still Waters

The day it rained blood in Chatham County

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On a cloudless day in 1884, a sharecropper named Bass Lasater noticed a bead of red liquid splash on the ground near her feet – the first drop in a blood-colored downpour.

She turned and watched red rain fall for almost a minute, spattering the field outside her cabin with splotches as big as a man’s finger. By the time the storm stopped, it had soaked a rectangle 50 feet wide and 70 feet across – nearly a tenth of an acre.

http://www.charlotte...ml#.Ulab-1PF8dU

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I thought for a minute that article was about Chatham in Kent. When it was a Naval Dockyard many years ago, rains of blood were a common occurrence - on Saturday nights after the pubs closed!

Edited by ealdwita
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This is.. really creepy.

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Does blood evaporate? It could be like, a lot of people were killed, and their blood formed clouds so it rained blood instead of water... I bet it killed so many plants and animals.

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I am gonna say bacteria(even algae), not blood.

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Bizarre...

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no it was blood, it was tested. and no blood can not evaporate only water from the blood.

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no it was blood, it was tested. and no blood can not evaporate only water from the blood.

Where was it tested, in 1884? It is more likely that the "rain" was just a story, made up to cover something more sinister!

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I love these types of mysteries... still happening.

What I find bizarre is a reference to Squirrel Nut Zippers, "As far as I can tell, nobody knows more about this curious event than Tom Maxwell, the guitarist and songwriter most of you know from his days with the Squirrel Nut Zippers."

I just saw a picture with the very same sequence of words yesterday but in totally different context....

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I don't expect to see those three words together, used in any other context ever again. Now that is weird.

Edited by Lava_Lady
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I believe many of these blood rains have been explained as either algae related or suspended dust particles, e.g. 2007 Siberian orange snow. If this were actually blood over this large an area, there would be a very distinct odor associated with it after the event. And, we don't know the sampling process used by the chemist other than it occurring sometime after the event. If this were a random sample, then I might argue the sample examined might be from an entirely different incident given the rural area.

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One has to read Charles Fort The Book Of The Damned or Wild Talents. All sort of weird things in the end of the 19th century early 20th like this are told with delight by Fort and the sources provided.

While some of them have found more credible scientific explanations other such as blood rains and ghost crafts for exemple are still complete mysteries.

Edited by sam_comm

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this is in fact remains a mystery but facts and history itself can be altered.

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It happens still today. Few years ago in India or Sri Lanka. But the analysis show it was a form of Algae. Not blood. If it was blood people could smell it.

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I believe many of these blood rains have been explained as either algae related or suspended dust particles, e.g. 2007 Siberian orange snow. If this were actually blood over this large an area, there would be a very distinct odor associated with it after the event. And, we don't know the sampling process used by the chemist other than it occurring sometime after the event. If this were a random sample, then I might argue the sample examined might be from an entirely different incident given the rural area.

There was a very good piece about this on I think History Channel, maybe NatGeo, as it happened in Malaysia or Indonesia. It wasn't really blood, but it was living matter. Yes, rather strange. :cry:

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There was a very good piece about this on I think History Channel, maybe NatGeo, as it happened in Malaysia or Indonesia. It wasn't really blood, but it was living matter. Yes, rather strange. :cry:

Yes it happened in Indonesia once if im not wrong, and it is 1 of the world's mysteries. But i dont think it is really blood... :hmm::rofl:

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